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Parker Ingenuity


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#41 dezzick3

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 19:08

Great Review, Thanks!!
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#42 Scylax

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 03:46

Forgive a newbie for jumping in here please!

First, thanks for the really interesting review. Fantastic photos too!

I have to agree with everyone who says this pen tries very hard to look like a fountain pen. Personally I quite like the styling, though I wouldn't rave over it. And as a heavy user of both ballpoint and rollerball pens, and sometimes felt-tips, I rather like the concept.

But, the thing that nearly made me faint is the price, which I believe is totally unrealistic. When I first saw the picture without knowing anything about the pen I thought it was an updated Vector. A vector fountain pen can be had for less than £10, so I thought I might see this priced at about £15-£20 since it's new. But £135?!? I am genuinely shocked by this, and would say that it puts serious pressure on Parker. I don't see how they can possibly sell enough to make it worth their while to keep making the refills (the price for those I'm okay with).

At a low price point I think this might have a fantastic market among young students, for example. I would certainly have loved something like this when I was at school. But it would need to be in the £10-£20 range to make that feasible.

Personally I would love to own one of these pens (the slim one-the big one looks bulky!), but I never will at anything like the retail price, sadly.

#43 atmozap

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 20:39

As a much less expensive alternative for a fiber tip in an upscale pen, I would recommend getting a Sharpie Sherpa, which is actually a holder or shell for a variety of disposable pens, along with the Paper Mate Liquid Expressos aka Liquid Flairs in fine or medium point. As a bonus they are also available in at least 8 colors.

#44 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 00:05

As a much less expensive alternative for a fiber tip in an upscale pen, I would recommend getting a Sharpie Sherpa, which is actually a holder or shell for a variety of disposable pens, along with the Paper Mate Liquid Expressos aka Liquid Flairs in fine or medium point. As a bonus they are also available in at least 8 colors.



What does the Sherpa look like?

BTW, I LOVE the Liquid Expressos!

#45 75er

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 13:18

Fantastic review. I'm all in with the "disingenuity" crowd here. Regardless of Parker's marketing pap, they've clearly created a cartridge pen hiding under a big, fake fountain pen nib. They wouldn't have bothered to make their "interactive hood" look like a fountain pen nib if they weren't trying to pass it off as such to the casual shopper.

I'm sure it's a great writer, but I won't pay over $60 for a cartridge pen, no matter the pretty body.

#46 Scrawler

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 14:05

Fantastic review. I'm all in with the "disingenuity" crowd here. Regardless of Parker's marketing pap, they've clearly created a cartridge pen hiding under a big, fake fountain pen nib. They wouldn't have bothered to make their "interactive hood" look like a fountain pen nib if they weren't trying to pass it off as such to the casual shopper.

I'm sure it's a great writer, but I won't pay over $60 for a cartridge pen, no matter the pretty body.

I do not believe they are trying to pass it off to the "casual shopper". There is no doubt that they are trying to make it look like an FP from a distance. While reviewing this pen myself I identified two legitimate markets for it. There are those who want to seem to be using an FP for the sake of appearances and status, and there are those who prefer an FP for normal writing, those who do not get on with ball points, who work in environments that present a risk to their beautiful expensive nibs.
There is a segment of the population that identify a good pen with status. There are also, dentists, engineers and safety inspectors who want a good quality smooth writing instrument that they can use on the job, while leaving the more delicate nib of their "real" pens at home. This pen is not for me. I strongly object to any pen that requires me to throw the tip away. However, I do believe the marketers, who had this pen designed, knew what they were doing. One huge advantage of the Parker Ingenuity is that I would have no qualms at all about lending one to a casual requester, whereas an attempt on their part to wrest one of my Parker Vacumatics from my grip, would result in strong words and possibly violence.

#47 atmozap

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 15:41

As a much less expensive alternative for a fiber tip in an upscale pen, I would recommend getting a Sharpie Sherpa, which is actually a holder or shell for a variety of disposable pens, along with the Paper Mate Liquid Expressos aka Liquid Flairs in fine or medium point. As a bonus they are also available in at least 8 colors.



What does the Sherpa look like?

BTW, I LOVE the Liquid Expressos!


You can see them here:
http://www.sherpapen.com/
They make a variety of patterns, some hokey, some classy. They also hold Uni-ball Vision Elites and Pilot Precise V5, V7. They apparently were originally conceived to hold sharpies, but these other pens are quite compatible.

#48 robofkent

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 20:01

I've been using a Parker Ingenuity for a couple of days now and I've really warmed to it. It is a very smooth writer although it is a little heavy for my liking as I have the Large model.

#49 radellaf

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 23:44

I've heard a lot of speculating that it writes like a flair or expresso or razor point -- does it?
I don't think anyone who actually has one has said if its just like those other plastic point pens, or (body notwithstanding) an actual improvement over them in some way.
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#50 tonydent84

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 07:43

I've heard a lot of speculating that it writes like a flair or expresso or razor point -- does it?
I don't think anyone who actually has one has said if its just like those other plastic point pens, or (body notwithstanding) an actual improvement over them in some way.



I'm actually super interested in knowing that too. I'm not too crazy about porous/felt-tip pens, mainly for two reasons -- they tend to be scratchy (like they scrape against the paper) and they are like pencil points, one side getting dull and the other side getting sharp, etc.


But I still intend to buy the large one either next month or in March. Not sure when. I like the idea behind the pen. I don't even see any YouTube reviews or demonstrations of the pen when I look around other than commercials. What I'm really wondering about though is that it seems as though you really can't turn the tip around to write so what if one side starts to become dull or overly scratchy? Do you take the refill out and flip it over or do you just live with it, etc.?



I'm also trying to figure out if this is really a new technology or just a very fancy felt-tip pen.

Edited by tonydent84, 20 January 2012 - 07:54.

I no longer own any fountain pens... Now they own me.

#51 Scrawler

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 11:04

I've heard a lot of speculating that it writes like a flair or expresso or razor point -- does it?
I don't think anyone who actually has one has said if its just like those other plastic point pens, or (body notwithstanding) an actual improvement over them in some way.



I'm actually super interested in knowing that too. I'm not too crazy about porous/felt-tip pens, mainly for two reasons -- they tend to be scratchy (like they scrape against the paper) and they are like pencil points, one side getting dull and the other side getting sharp, etc.


But I still intend to buy the large one either next month or in March. Not sure when. I like the idea behind the pen. I don't even see any YouTube reviews or demonstrations of the pen when I look around other than commercials. What I'm really wondering about though is that it seems as though you really can't turn the tip around to write so what if one side starts to become dull or overly scratchy? Do you take the refill out and flip it over or do you just live with it, etc.?



I'm also trying to figure out if this is really a new technology or just a very fancy felt-tip pen.

I can not comment on the "plastic point" pen because I do not know what that is. But yes you take the refill out and turn it over. I never found the point to become scratchy, but it did wear on the side it was being written on. However the refill does not last so long that it becomes a problem. I found the tip to be very well suited to the amount of writing the refill did.

#52 Scrawler

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 13:21

I'm amazed by the number of vague negative comments on this thread by people who have not tried the Inegnuity!

Try the pen and the comment on it. Otherwise your comments are based on visual opinion only, which isn't very helpful to anyone.

You could also read the reviews done by Ernst Bittermann and myself.

#53 radellaf

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:39

Well if you're $8 curious you could always buy a refill and try that. Wouldn't be fun for writing a long time but it'd be enough to see if it was different from other similar pens. I'm not, since $8 is too much, and I'm betting it's more or less just like a Pilot Razor Point. Which is fine, I love those pens. I've tried "fineliner" refills in heavier pens and just don't like the feel - doesn't seem to go with that kind of point, which needs a light touch. IMHO, and FWIW I never had them wear down noticeably.
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#54 Brianetta

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 14:37

The Fenwick department store in Newcastle upon Tyne has these on a display stand, with (chained down) test articles and paper available for a quick scribble. I had a quick scribble.

They reminded me very much of the Pilot DR drawing pen, which is lovely, but not a new idea.

I suspect that the target market is people who wish to project an image. They have the right suit, the right watch, the right cheque book cover... and they just need the right pen to sign that cheque. One that looks flash, but isn't a faff.
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#55 Corona688

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 21:11

Sorry to bump this, but

I wouldn't call this pen or Parker or Newel Rubbermaid deceitful. That is particularly strong language without any proof that they are deliberately trying to deceive people into thinking this is a fountain pen.

-- it is deceptive, very deceptive. It's clearly not a "normal" fountain pen, but looks related. Does the nib feed the central element somehow? I was intrigued. The look dovetails very nicely with its marketing hype as a new breed of writing instrument.

Of course, it's nothing but a sharpie with a humongous hood ornament.

Still, I don't think Parker's deceiving their customers. It's there to make it obviously not a ballpoint so someone can have a fancy "expensive" pen without worrying about the upkeep and care of a fountain pen. A clever piece of marketing.






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