Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink


  • Please log in to reply
419 replies to this topic

#61 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 23 November 2011 - 00:17

I did some writing on Levenger Storyboard Paper. The paper seems very rough (the nib drags in it), but I didn't see any feathering. On Rhodia Web Notebook paper, the ink shows no sign of feathering but takes a few more seconds to appear dry. I wouldn't hesitate to use it on Levenger Circa paper based on this preliminary experience.

Hi,

Many thanks for letting us know about yet more experiences with specific papers. :thumbup:

Due to the fairly low lubrication, I think most of those not familiar with i-g inks could well be adverse to any papers that do not have a smooth finish. It is my tendency to use Medium and wider nibs with i-g inks, partly to show-off the shading. Perhaps a textured paper + a narrow nib can be off-set by using less pressure - a very light hand. The line quality should remain high, as shown on the HiRes images on the G Lalo and Royal.

I agree about the dry times - certainly not a fast dry ink on the harder surfaced paper such as Rhodia. Even the first of the photos which show the change in tone & colour after writing show wet ink glistening
(click on the image), and that was perhaps 5-ish seconds elapsed from writing until Cathy positioned her camera and got the photo. IIRC, the paper was HPJ1124. (Believe it or not, the letters are 'str' from the word Registrars).

I'm not sure if using a blotter would be such a good thing - it would certainly soak-up any wet ink, but that may also change the appearance of the shading. IMHO, blotters are best used on more saturated inks without shading. e.g. PR American Blue, Diamine Majestic Blue.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


Sponsored Content

#62 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 23 November 2011 - 01:04

I got my 2 bottles in the mail yesterday. Now the problem. What do I decant the stuff into? I need to move it from the plastic to glass. Nice looking glass......very nice looking glass preferred. I have the Twsbi ink bottles but I need something in a larger volume. Anyone have any good ideas?

Hi,

Ah, OK. Let me just blurt this out: I have never been much impressed with good-looking glass - ink bottles belong in the dark, at least for long term storage.

I think for ESSRI, as it undergoes a significant change of colour and density, shows that it is reactive, so an effort should be made to reduce the amount of oxiidisation prior to writing.

Depending on volume used over a variable amount of time, I would split the 100ml into at least two brimming bottles for storage, plus a wee bottle for inking-up. So of the more common bottles I would suggest a 60ml MB bottle for storage, a 30ml [Pelikan 4001 or Visconti glass] bottle on deck, and a good-looking 10ml bottle in service. Or 3x30ml + 1x10ml. . . .

I like the MB bottle for storage because of the dual tank and sediment collector. I think that one should not be surprised in the least to see some sediment from ESSRI. Just leave it sit on the lees, and pour-off the sediment-free ink into the small tank; or if not using an MB bottle, into another bottle.

On the other hand, I have no experience to indicate that just decanting the ink into a 100ml glass bottle will do the necessary. So that is another decision that may effect the Look, but I rather doubt it would alter the performance. (Though I do recall some dip pen calligraphy i-g inks wanting to be 'refreshed' during use, but I have no idea if that realistically applies to ESSRI used in FPs. I would like to be informed otherwise on that point.)

I think there are aspects of using ESSRI that will become more clear as those using it chime-in with their experiences.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#63 JefferyS

JefferyS

    "Don't tase me, bro!"

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,348 posts
  • Location:New Orleans, LA
  • Flag:

Posted 23 November 2011 - 01:21

When I decanted my ESS into Waterman bottles, there was a layer of sediment on the bottom of the ESS bottle. That's not shocking (it wasn't fungal growth, but some sort of precipitate). I preferred not to agitate it back into the solution as I would rather that it not precipitate out later in my pen.

Decanting into clean glass bottles with little air seems like a good practice to me. I did it for years with liquid film developer (like Rodinal), and it works well.
Jeffery
In the Irish Channel of
New Orleans, LA

#64 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 23 November 2011 - 02:25

How timely that this thread popped up, as I've been asking for a day or two for suggestions on a quick-drying, quite permanent ink in blue-black to black shades. Someone mentioned ESSRI and now I've seen this. It looks like a great solution! Just two quick questions, being an i-g n00b:

1. While I can think of a few pens that would be nice to have this in, the pen I'm aiming to find the ink for is an Esterbrook 444 desk pen and "Dip-Less" inkwell. Being that the ink will be sitting in the well, as well as the pen sitting in that ink, do I have concerns? Do i-g inks (in the bottle) need to be shaken, and would the ink sitting in the inkwell 'settle', or is it not even an issue?

2. Since all it is is a nib sitting in the ink, it doesn't seem like cleaning will be a big issue, but since it could be in there for weeks (until I use it up), any thoughts? And the ink that is sitting in the capillary portion of the inkwell?

Heck, I'll probably get it anyway! Sandy1, I had to laugh when I read in your review the "Soul Source" for the ink - have I missed that in past reviews, or did you just include "Soul" because of the Ecclesiastical nature? Or is this Aretha's preferred ink?

Thanks - great review, as always...

Hi,

In a word, Ooops.
In two words, Unfortunately not.

As mentioned by the well-regarded Richard Binder, Post № 9, there is long-term risk exposure to corrosion of nibs & other parts not made from gold alloy when exposed to acidic inks, and i-g ink is acidic. (We await Trodat / ESS advice as to pH. Though no manufacturer is required to release such.)

I would not shake an i-g ink, as any sediment/precipitate seems quite unlikely to dissolve or go into solution. IMHO i-g inks are best left undisturbed; and one should certainly avoid drawing any sediment into a pen.

While I do not use the pen and inkwell you mention, I would suggest an ink that has characteristics similar to the inks contemporary to the gear. Ink brands such as Waterman, Quink, Skrip and Herbin come to mind. Some of the more saturated inks may well be diluted with [distilled] water. And those of near-neutral pH bear consideration. A bit of fiddling about should not be unexpected.

As for cleaning, depending on use, I would clean-up any drips on the spot, and every few weeks give the works a good cleaning. Do not return any of the ink to your storage bottle. Use of additional biocide may be considered.

I'm glad to have raised a laugh with that bit of word play. B)

I have no idea if ESSRI would be preferred by Aretha - somehow I think she'd fancy something with a bit more velocity & ooomph. Conversely, if ESSRI were to have a theme song, what might that be?

Bye,
S1

Edited by Sandy1, 23 November 2011 - 11:51.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#65 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,292 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 03:35

I have no idea if ESSRI would be preferred by Aretha - somehow I think she'd fancy something with a bit more velocity & ooomph. Conversely, if ESSRI were to have a theme song, what might that be?

Hehe... yeah, Aretha would definitely be both earthy and colorful. No button-down blue/black for her! As to ESSRI... how about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWqi9eWwXvk

As for the rest of your post, well...

- Heck, I already ordered a bottle, and I'm sure I'll find some nice uses in pens that can be cleaned easily and/or often;
- It's all good, no worries. That is why I asked, to see what might be a good way to use it. For the inkwell pen, I recently came into possession of a bottle of NOS Skrip permanent blue/black, and I like it a lot. I'll check the dry times on some old checks and stuff, but it has promise.

Thanks, Sandy!
"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#66 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,287 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 23 November 2011 - 08:18

Posted Image

Posted Image


100ml plastic bottle. I didn't realize it was going to be so huge. Waiting deliver today.

70 ml fits the round ink well, with the pressure close top, when the 50 ml insert is taken out.
What am I to do with the other 30 ml?
None of my inkwells are screw caps.

I had always wondered how that would look with the proper ink, back lighted. Something I'd be using by the 'bottle'. ---Now I find out that is bad for ink. :crybaby:

Empty ink bottle...surely you jest. I almost had one of them, but mixed Pelikan Royal Blue with Pelikan Blue Black for Pelikan Blue-Blue-black. That still needs more blue.

Live and learn, I thought the book case with the glass front and all the beer mugs would do for keeping the ink out of the sun.....dark places....right. Going to go drink some wine to make place in the cellar. :unsure:

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 23 November 2011 - 08:19.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#67 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 24 November 2011 - 11:44

I have no idea if ESSRI would be preferred by Aretha - somehow I think she'd fancy something with a bit more velocity & ooomph. Conversely, if ESSRI were to have a theme song, what might that be?

Hehe... yeah, Aretha would definitely be both earthy and colorful. No button-down blue/black for her! As to ESSRI... how about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWqi9eWwXvk

As for the rest of your post, well...

- Heck, I already ordered a bottle, and I'm sure I'll find some nice uses in pens that can be cleaned easily and/or often;
- It's all good, no worries. That is why I asked, to see what might be a good way to use it. For the inkwell pen, I recently came into possession of a bottle of NOS Skrip permanent blue/black, and I like it a lot. I'll check the dry times on some old checks and stuff, but it has promise.

Thanks, Sandy!

:roflmho:

I can't get that song out of my head!

:ltcapd:

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#68 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 24 November 2011 - 12:04

✃ snip ✁
100ml plastic bottle. I didn't realize it was going to be so huge. Waiting deliver today.
✃ snip ✁
. . . keeping the ink out of the sun.....dark places....right. Going to go drink some wine to make place in the cellar. :unsure:

Hi,

It is unfortunate that the most pleasing viewing conditions can also be quite harmful. The same goes for much visual media: the light that gives the best viewing conditions can cause them to deteriorate.

I made an error: ESSRI comes in a 110ml bottle - not 100ml.

As for empty bottles: Perhaps appropriate glass bottles with good caps can be sourced from your local chemist / pharmacy.

Please let us know of your experiences with ESSRI. Scans / photos would be much appreciated, especially as results from flexible nibs are so hard to describe; 'A picture is worth a thousand words'!

Bye
S1

Edited by Sandy1, 24 November 2011 - 14:35.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#69 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,287 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 24 November 2011 - 14:53

"""Perhaps appropriate glass bottles with good caps can be sourced from your local chemist / pharmacy.""" :thumbup: :thumbup:

They should be use to me by now...getting the longest biggest needle they had with syringe, ammonia, glycerin and now some empty bottles.

It did not come in yet.
Been a week since the order and it's only England.

Other ink came in....now it's back to the drawing board for what pen/nib to use.
I'm out of pens. :unsure: The three re-hydrated pens got used for Cafe` de Iles. :huh:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#70 Chiro75

Chiro75

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 663 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 20:06

Two bottles on the way to me. Sheesh, I need more ink like I need a hole in my head! Lol
Steve. Just plain ol' Steve.

#71 JefferyS

JefferyS

    "Don't tase me, bro!"

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,348 posts
  • Location:New Orleans, LA
  • Flag:

Posted 26 November 2011 - 22:46

My ESS arrived after 9 days, which seems to be the default time for it to cross the pond. Goulet Pens packages their ink about 100X more safely than ESS (they put the two bottles in a bubble wrap envelope), but it arrived undamaged. It is a wonderful ink.
Jeffery
In the Irish Channel of
New Orleans, LA

#72 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,292 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 22:50

I can't get that song out of my head!

:ltcapd:

My work here is done...
"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#73 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 27 November 2011 - 10:50

Two bottles on the way to me. Sheesh, I need more ink like I need a hole in my head! Lol

Hi,

Two bottles! Yikes - that's 220ml or a septet of wee Herbins. Please take special note of the decanting & storage suggestions in the review and prior replies.

That should keep you well inked for a few months at least . . . ;)

Bye,
S1

Edited by Sandy1, 27 November 2011 - 11:23.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#74 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 27 November 2011 - 11:15

My ESS arrived after 9 days, which seems to be the default time for it to cross the pond. Goulet Pens packages their ink about 100X more safely than ESS (they put the two bottles in a bubble wrap envelope), but it arrived undamaged. It is a wonderful ink.

Hi,

Glad to read that the ESSRI arrived safely, even without the Goulet Pens 'Blue Cloud' packaging.

Bye,
S1

- - - -

Off-Topic:

The Goulet's track record of having packages arrive safely is well known. There was some scuttlebutt as to their level of involvement with the delivery & landing phases of the latest Mars Mission: one of the the 56" scanners was jammed by technical drawings with wax seals affixed; and ICR s/w was flummoxed by correspondence with the valediction 'Write On'.

When this surveillance photo surfaced,
http://www.flickr.co...jpl/4774607729/
showing two masked, but somehow familiar, individuals present when the clean room should have been unmanned, whispers will not be silenced about the rover Curiosity - does it bear an ink drop decal?

- - - -

Edited by Sandy1, 27 November 2011 - 11:26.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#75 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,287 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:19

I have been waiting for my ink. I talked with my German postman today about the two weeks it has taken.

Then I mentioned the Royal Post, and he got a sour look on his face...even the German postal workers have heard of the Royal Postal service. :headsmack:


I telephoned the company and had a nice talk with the lady and am being shipped an other bottle, by air mail.

She said it's a 'small' bottle of ink....110 ml.

And that we are to use it up with in 12 to 18 months in it's not overloaded with chemicals.

I told her her ink was labeled "Majik". That made her very happy.

I told her to come take a look at us.

I will be using the following pens and nibs.
Reform 1745 regular flex F and EF and Geha maxi-semi-flex EF, and a Reform P-125 XXF. Two stripped 'no name' piston Clippers, one with a semi-flex F, the other with my Rupp maxi-semi-flex/'flexi' F. I have noticed with Pelikan Blue Black, the regular flex and the maxi-semi-flex/'flexi' really shined and the semi-flex F, didn't at all. So one needs at least three flexes F nibs to have a solid look. I will have four F's; one a full flex nib.

Other pens that will be used is a Osmia mdl 63 semi-flex BBL/OBB, MB Woolf springy B(BB), Estrabrook 2968 firm Broad in that nail/regular flex does have a different tone than nibs with more flex. A MB 234 1/2 semi-flex KOB.

A semi-flex Osmia 62 ML/OM and a Geha 790 semi-flex KM; both are wet writers, my Cross M nail, and two easy full flex Degussa nibs, one in F, the other in M.
That should give me a full assortment of nibs, a couple nails. a couple regular flex, some semi-flex and maxi-semi-flex in regular and oblique, and a couple of the full flex.
Ten pens and 10 papers should do the rest of the trick.

Gordot did not have ink in the mail.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 29 November 2011 - 10:22.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#76 Sandy1

Sandy1

    Minty

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,902 posts
  • Location:Voodoo Convent

Posted 29 November 2011 - 12:37

I have been waiting for my ink. I talked with my German postman today about the two weeks it has taken.

Then I mentioned the Royal Post, and he got a sour look on his face...even the German postal workers have heard of the Royal Postal service. :headsmack:


I telephoned the company and had a nice talk with the lady and am being shipped an other bottle, by air mail.

She said it's a 'small' bottle of ink....110 ml.

And that we are to use it up with in 12 to 18 months in it's not overloaded with chemicals.

✃snip✁


Ten pens and 10 papers should do the rest of the trick.

Gordot did not have ink in the mail.

Hi,

Many thanks for the update. :thumbup:

Interesting that ESS mentioned such a short 'use by' date for an ink that is supposedly rather acidic. (Still awaiting advice on the pH.) Additional biocide may be required for longer-term storage. Perhaps those who have used the ink for some time could share their experience on that aspect of ESSRI.

I agree that ten papers and ten pens (one hundred samples?) should "do the rest of the trick".

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#77 swanjun

swanjun

    (Not really a lamb.)

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,017 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 29 November 2011 - 13:25

I made an error: ESSRI comes in a 110ml bottle - not 100ml.

As for empty bottles: Perhaps appropriate glass bottles with good caps can be sourced from your local chemist / pharmacy.


I, too, have some ESSRI on the way. I was wondering how best to heed your recommendation regarding decanting, and then I saw this:

http://www.gouletpen...-d.htm?CartID=1

It's an empty 110 ml Private Reserve bottle on sale at Goulet for $0.50. Some minor rinsing is required, but then my ESSRI will have a nice new home!

#78 Chiro75

Chiro75

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 663 posts

Posted 29 November 2011 - 15:04

Yeah, that is a crapload of ink I ordered, isn't it? I write SOME but not TONS. My goal is to set aside all my other inks and use this until I run out. We'll see!

On a side-note, since this changes color with oxidation, is it a bad idea to use it in an inkwell (484 from Esterbrook)?
Steve. Just plain ol' Steve.

#79 Ad_Astra

Ad_Astra

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 491 posts
  • Location:Georgia
  • Flag:

Posted 29 November 2011 - 15:22

My goal is to set aside all my other inks and use this until I run out. We'll see!


...haven't we all said that at least once and failed miserably? :P
Non est ad astra mollis e terris via. - Seneca

#80 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,287 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 29 November 2011 - 19:16

I'm not into writing classics, on many pages.

I'm going to be doing the name of the pen and two Let it Be's....L et it B e one light, and one more ham fisted.
That gives me some action with the nib.
Those nibs with a tad more flex, some Snidely Whiplash handlebar mustache L's. The full flex full English handlebar mustache L, and a few rattle snake S's.

Added a Clipper semi flex M to the mix.

8 pens cleaned out this evening, 4 last night.

Report from the Front. Captain D. J. Esterbrook, class of '48-52, has fallen; shot in the 63 year old sac. Died seeking Majik. Fallen for Ink and Paper, this day 29-11-2011.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 







Sponsored Content




|