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Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink


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456 replies to this topic

#441 sciumbasci

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 18:45

Received my ink.  The color and shading are wonderful.  The dryness on plain lousy copy paper is not so pleasant.  On better paper it's just fine.

There is absolutely no feathering.

I've seen conflicting advice as to whether a bit of detergent or glycerine would help the dryness. 

Opinions?


I dunked a toothpick into dish washing soap, and then dunked it into a small sample vial filled with ink.
Try. What's the worse that can happen? If it is too wet, just add more ink,if it still is dry, repeat the dunking. You get a pretty amount of ink anyway.

Just rec'd my order from ESS and Parker Vector.
 
The Vector is a black plastic Medium, made in France. Also came with a Luxor-made slide converter. Both new in the blister packs, of course. 


Haha!
Thanks for the report.
I am positively impressed the Vector is made in France.

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#442 NumberSix

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 18:49

Haha!
Thanks for the report.
I am positively impressed the Vector is made in France.

Gotta admit I like the slide converter, too. Very easy to fill and to flush. Reminds me of the Noodler's plunger converters. 



#443 NumberSix

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 23:50

Any reason not to put this ink into the converter of a Montblanc 145? 

 

Probably better the converter-filler than the piston-filler ones, eh?



#444 silverlifter

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Posted 31 May 2020 - 00:01

MB made their own, excellent, iron gall ink for many years. I'm sure ESSRI would be fine in it. I load my 14 and 34 with DRI with no complaints.


Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#445 NumberSix

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 14:33

Last night, I inked up my Montblanc 145 (M) with it. Interestingly, it was too darn dry. I had periodic railroading and poor flow.

 

It's not the pen. I have had a couple of different black inks in there with no issue. And for the moment it has Quink Blue, as a test fill after I flushed out the ESSRI. No issues right now, and I might leave the Quink in there instead of something fancier, cuz I like it. 

 

ESSRI worked fine in a Parker Vector and in a gold-nibbed Parker 45 (M). 



#446 khalameet

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 15:57

@silverlifter: You seem to use iron gall inks in any pen? I am reluctant filling some of my pens with iron gall because of the cleaning issues. Some iron galls collect residue rather fast and with some converters (Pilot Con-70) it is really painful to remove this, even with ascorbic acid. What are your experiences?



#447 inkstainedruth

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 17:03

khalameet, I don't know what experiences silverlifter has had with IG inks but I use them a lot (although I have not tried ESSRI).  I don't let the inks sit in the pen a long time, and I don't tend to refill, but flush after every fill is used up and the pen is written dry.  And I use c/c pens for the most part for IG inks (I use a bunch of inexpensive Parker Vectors with steel nibs and have not really had a problem; I did have a Con-B converter sac on a Pilot Metropolitan go bad, but that was also some vintage IG ink that I suspect had gone bad (and I only paid a buck for the ink).

What flushing method are you using?  Normally I flush a pen with distilled water, then dilute ammonia solution (roughly 1 part clear household ammonia to about 9 parts distilled water) with a little dish detergent, then flush really well with more distilled water.  But for IG inks, because they are so acidic, I substitute dilute white vinegar solution for the ammonia solution.  After that is flushed out with distilled water, I then do an ammonia solution flush (someone on here who was a chemist explained why the ammonia solution worked after the vinegar solution in a thread a few years ago), and then do a final rinse with more distilled water, before draining the pen, nib down, in paper toweling. 

Some people go "Oh, pooh pooh -- I just use tap water!"  But I *can't* -- I have very hard water where I live and I see the buildup of mineral deposits around my faucets -- and I don't want those deposits clogging up a pen feed!  Where I live, I can buy distilled water for under a dollar US a gallon at the local grocery store, and spend about four bucks apiece for gallon jugs of both the white vinegar and the clear ammonia).  And because of the dilution, and because I'm only making up a little of each solution as needed, it's not only cost effective but takes a long time to go through either the ammonia or the vinegar.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#448 silverlifter

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 17:44

@silverlifter: You seem to use iron gall inks in any pen? I am reluctant filling some of my pens with iron gall because of the cleaning issues. Some iron galls collect residue rather fast and with some converters (Pilot Con-70) it is really painful to remove this, even with ascorbic acid. What are your experiences?

 

The only IG ink that I treat differently to any other ink is DRI. All the modern ones, I treat the same. With DRI, I wouldn't put it in a pen that doesn't have a good seal (note, for me, that means I couldn't leave the pen untouched for 2-3 weeks), and I wouldn't use it for any length of time (measured in months) in a pen with a cheap steel nib.

 

I have not had any issues cleaning pens, which I do infrequently because I generally find a pen/ink combination I like and then mostly stick to that. So, I will go for months at a time just refilling, not flushing.

 

Overall, I find the fear of IG inks to be baseless. Almost all of them are exceptionally well made, behave impeccably, and pose no more risk to your pen than normal wear and tear. For me, IG inks are like sharks: they are among the most amazing organisms in their environment, yet people are scared of them , even though they are much more likely to die on the road. :)


Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#449 NumberSix

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 17:56

much more likely to die on the road. :)

I read this bit as "sharks more likely to die on the road", and I was trying to figure out what you could possibly have meant!  :lol:



#450 khalameet

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 19:12

@inkstainedruth: Where I live, the water is of very good quality. So I just tend to use tap water instead of distilled water, which works fine for a few years now. Most of the time I flush the pen with an ascorbic acid solution (just ascorbic acid in water) and let it sit for an hour or so, depending on which IG ink I used. This dissolves most of the dried iron gall content and is fine for most pens. After that I flush thoroughly with tap water and drain the pen in kitchen towel a few times.

 

I never had a problem with IG inks (and doubt that I ever will), but the Pilot Con-70 converter is very hard to clean, even with normal low maintenance inks, because a lot of colour sits behind the seal (hard to explain for me, as I am not a native speaker...). This is really hard to get out, even with repeatedly flushing or even shaking the converter. Even if you disassemble it, you can not get behind this plunger seal to remove any ink there. Most of the time this is fine, because this is only a little bit of colour and I don't mind filling it with another ink. I don't think that you can get a bad reaction there. BUT, if a little bit of dried IG ink is in there, you can imagine that it is very difficult to clean thorougly. I have 2 Con-70 which have dried IG content inside which I was not able to remove.

 

Maybe I should just use other pens or converters for this type of inks.

 

@silverlifter: I use IG inks for a few years now and never had a problem. I am not afraid of using them. I forgot a lot of pens filled with IG ink in my drawer, even for more than a year (a TWSBI Eco filled with Salix, which wrote on the first stroke after a year and cleaned out just fine). But with some pens/converters, the cleaning is not very fun, like I tried to explain further above.

 

But I really liked your post, especially the last sentence :)



#451 Eclipse157

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 07:22

Have you considered using a refilled Pilot cartridge instead of a con-70 for when you use IG inks?



#452 khalameet

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 15:07

Well...no. Seriously, thank you. This is such a simple solution that I just overlooked!

 

I have a few cartridges of Pilot Blue Black which came with the pens, I did not use them for years. Maybe I will clean them out this weekend!



#453 inkstainedruth

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 16:19

I never had a problem with IG inks (and doubt that I ever will), but the Pilot Con-70 converter is very hard to clean, even with normal low maintenance inks, because a lot of colour sits behind the seal (hard to explain for me, as I am not a native speaker...). This is really hard to get out, even with repeatedly flushing or even shaking the converter. Even if you disassemble it, you can not get behind this plunger seal to remove any ink there. Most of the time this is fine, because this is only a little bit of colour and I don't mind filling it with another ink. I don't think that you can get a bad reaction there. BUT, if a little bit of dried IG ink is in there, you can imagine that it is very difficult to clean thorougly. I have 2 Con-70 which have dried IG content inside which I was not able to remove.

 

Hmmm.  Sounds like the problem I've had with a couple of other converters (most recently the Lamy converter I had in my Lamy LX -- while I've been told I can take it apart, I bought a backup converter for it just in case).  I don't have any pens with a Con-70 converter, but I dislike the Con-40 converter in my Decimo immensely, due to the difficulty getting a complete fill, on top of its small capacity in general.

I'm wondering now if there's a problem with the seal on the piston on your converter -- I know that converters don't last forever, but the ones that I had problems with shouldn't have died on me as quickly as they did (the LX converter I bought after buying the pen in 2018 (which was when Lamy's old US distributor had a closeout sale).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#454 aurore

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 22:38

Hmmm.  Sounds like the problem I've had with a couple of other converters (most recently the Lamy converter I had in my Lamy LX -- while I've been told I can take it apart, I bought a backup converter for it just in case).  I don't have any pens with a Con-70 converter, but I dislike the Con-40 converter in my Decimo immensely, due to the difficulty getting a complete fill, on top of its small capacity in general.

I'm wondering now if there's a problem with the seal on the piston on your converter -- I know that converters don't last forever, but the ones that I had problems with shouldn't have died on me as quickly as they did (the LX converter I bought after buying the pen in 2018 (which was when Lamy's old US distributor had a closeout sale).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

I have had several CON-70 and all worked in the manner described above from the very beginning. The overall construction of this converter is completely different from the others.



#455 NumberSix

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 19:40

I have been trying this ink in various pens. Some worked fine (Vector, P45). Some did not work great - my MB 145, oddly, hard starts and sometimes railroads with this ink and Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black, though it works okay with other inks.

 

Today, I decided to throw caution to the wind and load ESSRI into my Vac 51. These pens were built for inks like Superchrome, after all, and pens are made to be used.

 

So far so good. It's writing with the same kind of lovely pencil feedback I was getting with 4001 Royal Blue. I have already written a full page + a little more, and there's no skipping or hard starting. Just the same nice clean medium lines I have always gotten from this pen with 4001 Royal Blue or Quink Washable Blue. 

 

We shall see over time...



#456 Mannyonpil

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Posted 23 June 2020 - 07:31

This is my new favorite ink. I am using it in a rather beat-up John Holland (#2 nib) and it is doing quite well. I have not tried it in anything else yet. 

 

It is clearly a dry ink but it flows quite readily in comparison to Akkerman #10 or Pelikan Blue-Black. This Holland nib is admittedly rather wet so this is just the thing to tame it.



#457 txomsy

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 07:45

I do also love ESSR,

 

As for using IG inks... I do not make a distinction between inks, juts use them (except for not mixing BSB).

 

I like to switch colors, so whenever I empty a pen I always flush it with tap water (as khalameet, water quality is very good here). Yet...

 

In ye goode olde tymes :) , those of (almost) one person-one pen :yikes: , when I was a student, I would use one bottle of ink to the bottom and only when I switched bottles would switch colors, in those fast note-taking times, I wouldn't even clean the pen between refills from the same bottle, just refill and go on. I only cleaned it when switching colors for obvious reasons, and some times if the colors were close not even then. And of course pens would rest unused for the long summer holidays and dry out, which I would solve by straight refilling from the same (only one I had) bottle which had also rested unused.

 

I should say I never noticed clogging problems no matter what pen I used. Maybe I wasn't aware or was too tolerant (or I didn't know any better, who knows, those times are long gone).

 

Even with BSB, now I just do a (somewhat more thorough) flush with tap water and go on.

 

Maybe it was due to the pen manuals which recommended flushing the pen once a year except when using permanent inks, which required a flush twice a year. Maybe modern pens are more fragile.

 

BTW, you may find interesting reading current Montblanc user manual (go to page 14). They recommend cleaning your pen each 3 months, or if it had dried or clogged or had flow issues, using plain lukewarm water (and no flush fluid). No mention of cleaning after each emptying, using distilled water or any other such. I can see where very strong water may not be advisable, but I always understood plain tap water every (long) so was enough. And, as mentioned, it has worked for me for over almost 50 years.

 

Indeed, I do feel uneasy leaving a section on water overnight, which I have only done when cleaning a pen left unused for years that had been forgotten with a full load of ink (or a full cartridge) that -obviously- dried out, and only to make sure it washed out clean and new ink would not be horribly color contaminated (oversaturated, actually) by the redissolved load of dried old pigments.

 

Now, all that is my own, limited, barbarian experience which I produce in the hope it may dispel what I perceive as too strong (panicking?) fears, but I may as well be totally and utterly wrong. Take it with a load of salt. YMM(strongly)V.


Edited by txomsy, 25 June 2020 - 07:47.







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