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Waterman Sterling Silver Gentleman


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#1 jar

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 17:14

So far we have looked at three Sterling Silver fountain pens, the Montegrappa 80th Anniversary and large Privilege Deco and the Sheaffer Legacy. They are all medium to large pens, so now let's look at an example that is slimmer and lighter, weighing in as only 32 gm, the Waterman Gentleman Sterling Silver.

The time is the mid seventies and Waterman has introduced what will be their flagship pen until the introduction of the Man 100 about a decade later. Unlike the more angular and futuristic pens such as the CF series, the Concord and the DG line, this was a return to the fairly straight flat top models.

Here you can see a Gentleman in a wondrously deep burgundy lacquer (that unfortunately loses much of its depth and vibrancy under artificial lighting) next to the later Man 100 Opera.

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But it is the Sterling Silver version that this reviews covers.

It came in pretty much the same box that all my relatively modern Waterman pens used, simple blue with a white lining.

Posted Image

Like the Sheaffer Legacy it is a snap on cap that holds and posts securely. Like the two Montegrappas it uses the International Standard cartridge or converter.

Posted Image

The ridged section is exceptionally easy to use over an extended period even though the section is quite slim. The nib is a classic 18K Waterman nib of the period, pretty stiff for writing through carbons and none of the flex found in so many of the vintage Waterman nibs.

Of the four pens discussed so far, it is about the longest and also by far the slimmest, despite that I still often find it gets into rotation. I imagine that it uses a little "deux chevaux" to sneak in under the regulations.

Posted Image


Edited by watch_art, 23 July 2011 - 00:56.

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#2 Koyote

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 18:18

Jar, I love silver pens - my only examples are silver-plated, but they are the prettiest I own. Your endowment of silver pens is simply beautiful.

#3 hari317

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 19:11

Thanks for reviewing this pen. I had noticed this pen when someone (I think it was Barrie P.) was selling this on PT GB about a year back at a very attractive price. I love the way the ridged section enters under the section trim ring and the way the nib exits, the almost flareless straight sided nib reminds me of the dip pen that I was fond of using for school homework: Mehra Leonardt "Office pen".
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#4 vickiehof

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 22:51

I bought one of these from a FPN member last year. It's a very dependable writer and is always in my rotation. All of my various models of Watermans (from cheap to antique) are a joy to use.

#5 lowks

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 02:26

I have a waterman laureat and for some reason I really love writing with it. Wish it spotted a oblique nib though.

#6 Inkwisitor

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 14:43

This has been a great series of reviews - thank you!
"The cultured man is the man whose interior consciousness is forever obstinately writing down, in the immaterial diary of his psyche's sense of life, every chance aspect of every new day that he is lucky enough to live to behold!" - John Cowper Powys

#7 jar

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 15:39

This has been a great series of reviews - thank you!


Thank you. Only a few more to cover.

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#8 pelman

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 16:41

[/quote]

Thank you. Only a few more to cover.
[/quote]


:puddle: can't wait to hear about them.

#9 jar

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 16:46


Thank you. Only a few more to cover.



:puddle: can't wait to hear about them.


It may be awhile. Temperatures out in Cafe Caffè have been up in the 100s for the last week or so and not even the doggies think that is nice.

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#10 pelman

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 17:09


Thank you. Only a few more to cover.



:puddle: can't wait to hear about them.


It may be awhile. Temperatures out in Cafe Caffè have been up in the 100s for the last week or so and not even the doggies think that is nice.


will wait patiently then. stay cool. we are getting similar weather in my neck of the woods.

#11 Sonia

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:23

So far we have looked at three Sterling Silver fountain pens, the Montegrappa 80th Anniversary

and large Privilege Deco and the Sheaffer Legacy. They are all medium to large pens, so now let's look at an example that is slimmer and lighter, weighing in as only 32 gm, the Waterman Gentleman Sterling Silver.The time is the mid seventies and Waterman has introduced what will be their flagship pen until the introduction of the Man 100 about a decade later. Unlike the more angular and futuristic pens such as the CF series, the Concord and the DG line, this was a return to the fairly straight flat top models.Here you can see a Gentleman in a wondrously deep burgundy lacquer (that unfortunately loses much of its depth and vibrancy under artificial lighting) next to the later Man 100 Opera.

standard.jpg

But it is the Sterling Silver version that this reviews covers.It came in pretty much the same box that all my relatively modern Waterman pens used, simple blue with a white lining.

standard.jpg

Like the Sheaffer Legacy it is a snap on cap that holds and posts securely. Like the two Montegrappas it uses the International Standard cartridge or converter.

standard.jpg

The ridged section is exceptionally easy to use over an extended period even though the section is quite slim. The nib is a classic 18K Waterman nib of the period, pretty stiff for writing through carbons and none of the flex found in so many of the vintage Waterman nibs.Of the four pens discussed so far, it is about the longest and also by far the slimmest, despite that I still often find it gets into rotation. I imagine that it uses a little "deux chevaux" to sneak in under the regulations.

standard.jpg



Lovely article lovely pens Thanks

#12 glennhkc

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 00:28

Thanks for your review.  I just bought a NOS silver Gentleman on eBay.   Hard to imagine such a fine pen languishing in its box for the last 40 years, but I'll certainly give it the attention it deserves.  Its section is thinner than I expected and even with my smaller hands, it's not one I'll choose for long writing sessions, but perfect for short notes at work with the snap cap.  Now I'll look for a Le Man 100 which replaced the Gentleman at the top of the Waterman line around 1980.  I wonder if the thinner Le Man 200 is a similar size to the Gentleman.    

 

I love silver pens and look forward to more.  The silver Parker 75 and Sonnet are amongst my most attractive pens.  


Edited by glennhkc, 03 February 2018 - 00:32.


#13 wspohn

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 20:10

The Gentleman was the flagship pen for Waterman for almost seven years until the Le Man showed up.  the lacquered finishes were nice, but I agree that the sterling versions are the choice ones.   I own most of them. What makes them a bit more expensive to own is if you want to change the nib. The sterling extends into the nib section, unlike other models that have plastic sections so cost goes up if you want to add a nib to your pen and it gets harder to find as you not only need a specific nib, you need it with the same pattern as your pen!

 

They had several sterling finishes as well as a Franklin Mint version. Too bad they seemed to suffer in popularity - probably because of their size. I rarely paid more than $130 for a sterling version when I was collecting them,and even bought a couple just for the section/nibs as I paid less for the pen than for the section would have cost me.

 

Today, they seem to have become recognized and asking prices start around $200 and go (way) up from there.


Bill Spohn
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