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Stipula Brunelleschi Terra Siena


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Painterspal

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 21:40

Stipula Brunelleschi Terra Siena

Lately my pen obsession has diverged into two distinct main strands or, more accurately, countries of origin: Japan and Italy. Of the latter, my unhealthiest preoccupation has centered on Stipula. I love the Etrurias, but limited finance means I've needed to be choosy - can't have 'em all (sigh), shouldn't really be buying any! But when has that ever stopped me? Note to self: must stop these FPN confessionals, it's becoming embarrassing.

So here's the thing, I like the piston fillers but find the current Stipulas rather heavy. A black c/c filler was a revelation - light, well-balanced, amazingly comfortable - so good I just couldn't put it down, but it isn't a piston filler and all that pretty celluloid beckoned me to buy more - and how could I refuse - but which one? After a bit more reading I discovered that the earlier Etruria piston fill pens are lighter than than the current models, and the amber celluloid is, in my opinion, more beautiful than the current variety, so I lurked on the FPN classifieds and eventually managed to pick one up. It's a terrific pen, but for me the relatively straight section isn't quite so ergonomic as the more recent, rather concave design so I carried on looking.

And here's where I've ended up, a Stipula Brunelleschi Terra Siena. Okay, it's not an Etruria, but it's pretty similar and it ticks all the right boxes: piston filler, concave section, lovely celluloid, sterling silver accents, same great nib all present and correct. I'm not a Stipula expert but the Brunelleschi Terra Siena doesn't seem to be a current model and my pen is a prototype; it's marked P03/351. I don't know how it varies from the rest of the edition, if at all.

Posted Image

Compared to the Etruria it's somewhat slimmer and a little less curvy, rather as though it's been on a diet or working out at the gym. The cap is shorter and more pointed, the grip fractionally narrower and the clip is of a different design. Perhaps most noticeably, the cap threads are at the nib end of the section, rather like the Model T and very unobtrusive, enhancing the clean lines and shapeliness of the pen (though I wonder how well they'll wear with regular use). It also lacks the cap band that sets the Etruria pens apart, but looks very handsome nonetheless.

Weight and balance are perfect for me. Capped it's about 30g, the pen upcapped is about 20g which is how I use it. Balance is excellent; in spite of the piston it isn't particularly tail heavy. In terms of size it's a tad longer than a Pelikan M800 and about the same width at its widest point. The celluloid is the same as used on the Etruria Volterra, a rich reddish orange, the colour of terracotta tiles or bricks baked in the warmth of the Italian sun, but with subtle green accents. The only detail I was initially dubious about is a little green 'jewel' on the clip. It matches the green accents in the celluloid quite nicely and it's unobtrusive, which is fine by me.

The nib is typical Stipula. Mine is an 18K bold. It's smooth and quite juicy, firm with just a little spring to it. Stipula nibs are among my favourites and this one is no exception. I usually re-grind my nibs to cursive italic but will probably live with this one as it is for a while.

Overall it's a wonderful pen, arguably as close to perfect as any I own. I can see it getting a lot of use. There's not much more to add - I think I've satisfied my Stipula craving... for now!

Pictured below is the Brunelleschi with the current Alter Ego and my small (but perfectly formed) Stipula collection. I'll try to add a writing sample and some images that really do it justice in a week or two.



Posted Image

Posted Image

10.5.11 edited a typo.

Edited by Painterspal, 10 May 2011 - 15:50.

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#2 Inkwisitor

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 08:08

Thanks for a nice review. This was a model that I was previously unaware of and which I find very attractive. I particularly liked your comment about the colour resembling "terracotta bricks or tiles" as that is exactly how I reacted to the photograph of it. Don't give up on the "confessionals", I'm sure you speak for many of us!
"The cultured man is the man whose interior consciousness is forever obstinately writing down, in the immaterial diary of his psyche's sense of life, every chance aspect of every new day that he is lucky enough to live to behold!" - John Cowper Powys

#3 fabrimedeiros

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 14:59

Thank you for this great review. I would love try one with a 1.3 stub!

#4 John Cullen

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 15:12

Thanks for the photos. those threads on the nib end of the section are darn near invisible! Looks vry nice.

#5 mbradley

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 01:24

Beautiful pen and a nice review. I could certainly be very happy with a nice Stipula. I would have to say that at least for me; Stipula makes some of the most elegant and fine looking pens in the world.


Michael



#6 akrishna59

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 08:03

thanks for a concise and down to earth review. that collection of your is truly remarkable, though the number may be small, the taste is exquisite.

rgds.

krishna.
ladies and gentlemen write with fountain pens only.

#7 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 08:50

very good review and thanks for sharing this beauty :thumbup: I will ask my favorite penshop owner to hunt one for me in terra di siena and another in mare ligure.
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#8 Jonst

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 12:49

Lovely looking pen Painterspal, and thanks for the review.

I haven't really considered Stipula before but I might just have to give them a closer look.

Best wishes

Jon

#9 acolythe

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 13:14

Stipula Brunelleschi Terra Siena

Lately my pen obsession has diverged into two distinct main strands or, more accurately, countries of origin: Japan and Italy. Of the latter, my unhealthiest preoccupation has centered on Stipula. I love the Etrurias, but limited finance means I've needed to be choosy - can't have 'em all (sigh), shouldn't really be buying any! But when has that ever stopped me? Note to self: must stop these FPN confessionals, it's becoming embarrassing.

So here's the thing, I like the piston fillers but find the current Stipulas rather heavy. A black c/c filler was a revelation - light, well-balanced, amazingly comfortable - so good I just couldn't put it down, but it isn't a piston filler and all that pretty celluloid beckoned me to buy more - and how could I refuse - but which one? After a bit more reading I discovered that the earlier Etruria piston fill pens are lighter than than the current models, and the amber celluloid is, in my opinion, more beautiful than the current variety, so I lurked on the FPN classifieds and eventually managed to pick one up. It's a terrific pen, but for me the relatively straight section isn't quite so ergonomic as the more recent, rather concave design so I carried on looking.

And here's where I've ended up, a Stipula Brunelleschi Terra Siena. Okay, it's not an Etruria, but it's pretty similar and it ticks all the right boxes: piston filler, concave section, lovely celluloid, sterling silver accents, same great nib all present and correct. I'm not a Stipula expert but the Brunelleschi Terra Siena doesn't seem to be a current model and my pen is a prototype; it's marked P03/351. I don't know how it varies from the rest of the edition, if at all.

Posted Image

Compared to the Etruria it's somewhat slimmer and a little less curvy, rather as though it's been on a diet or working out at the gym. The cap is shorter and more pointed, the grip fractionally narrower and the clip is of a different design. Perhaps most noticeably, the cap threads are at the nib end of the section, rather like the Model T and very unobtrusive, enhancing the clean lines and shapeliness of the pen (though I wonder how well they'll wear with regular use). It also lacks the cap band that sets the Etruria pens apart, but looks very handsome nonetheless.

Weight and balance are perfect for me. Capped it's about 30g, the pen upcapped is about 20g which is how I use it. Balance is excellent; in spite of the piston it isn't particularly tail heavy. In terms of size it's a tad longer than a Pelikan M800 and about the same width at its widest point. The celluloid is the same as used on the Etruria Volterra, a rich reddish orange, the colour of terracotta tiles or bricks baked in the warmth of the Italian sun, but with subtle green accents. The only detail I was initially dubious about is a little green 'jewel' on the clip. It matches the green accents in the celluloid quite nicely and it's unobtrusive, which is fine by me.

The nib is typical Stipula. Mine is an 18K bold. It's smooth and quite juicy, firm with just a little spring to it. Stipula nibs are among my favourites and this one is no exception. I usually re-grind my nibs to cursive italic but will probably live with this one as it is for a while.

Overall it's a wonderful pen, arguably as close to perfect as any I own. I can see it getting a lot of use. There's not much more to add - I think I've satisfied my Stipula craving... for now!

Pictured below is the Brunelleschi with the current Alter Ego and my small (but perfectly formed) Stipula collection. I'll try to add a writing sample and some images that really do it justice in a week or two.



Posted Image

Posted Image

10.5.11 edited a typo.


Where can I get one?
b

#10 saintsimon

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 15:09

I would consider selling my 03x/351 Brunelleschi Terra die Siena, iff serious offers come in. Feel free to send me a PM.

Except of the nib itself, it is in excellent condition with box & papers. It has seen hardly any use, since within the first week of ownership it fell onto a hardwood floor, bending the nib, no further damage. The nib is repairable by a good Nibmeister, I assume. If I remeber well, the 18K 0.9 mm stub bi-colour Stipula/Bock nib had a baby bottom problem anyway. It screws out and can be exchanged for other Stipula/Bock nib units. The Sterling Silver hardware of the body requires regular polishing, as usual. I bought it new from a Canadian ebay seller.

It is really pleasant to hold, the Amphora shaped body sits well in the hand and the Celluloid makes it warm to the touch.

Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image

Edited by saintsimon, 15 June 2011 - 16:35.







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