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How to replace an Esterbrook Sac


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#161 madeline

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Posted 13 May 2018 - 19:39

Today I tried my first sac replacement.  It was easier than I thought except for trying to make a straight cut on the initial sac.  I used a #16 (for an Esterbrook J).  I measured and then cut the end of the sac.  But I needed to make a second cut to achieve the recommended straight-across cut.  (Must get some better scissors!)  I then went on to install the sac.  Now that it's done, I am concerned because it looks a bit short.  I used the advice for lever-fill pens to ensure that the new sac does not extend past the end of the lever when everything is reassembled.  And mine meets that criteria, but it looks rather short nonetheless.  If this simply means that it won't hold a lot of ink, that would be completely okay.  But if this means that the lever and J-bar mechanism will not properly engage the sac, that of course is bad.  I will have to wait for everything to dry before dusting the sac, putting the pen back together again, and then testing it.  But in the meantime I thought I would post this question...  Is it possible that I've made this new sac too short?  (And what is "too short" for an Estie?)

 

Thanks for all the terrific tips and tutorials in these threads.  I would never have considered trying this a few months ago!


Moderation in everything, including moderation.     

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#162 pajaro

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Posted 13 May 2018 - 20:11

Without a picture, I will say that I have done this before, and all worked OK.  I have used a Parker 51 sac a couple of times, and that looked a bit short, but worked out well in a late model LJ and in a J.  These pens are pretty resilient.


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#163 madeline

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Posted 13 May 2018 - 21:07

Without a picture, I will say that I have done this before, and all worked OK.  I have used a Parker 51 sac a couple of times, and that looked a bit short, but worked out well in a late model LJ and in a J.  These pens are pretty resilient.

 

That's reassuring.  Thank you, pajaro!  I'll attach a photo. 

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Moderation in everything, including moderation.     

                                                                                     --Mark Twain


#164 cattar

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Posted 13 May 2018 - 23:22

I too cut the sac based on lever placement.

I wonder if this maximizes the capacity:burping ratio.

#165 madeline

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Posted 14 May 2018 - 01:18

That's very interesting....  So a shorter sac might reduce the tendency for burping?


Moderation in everything, including moderation.     

                                                                                     --Mark Twain


#166 cattar

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Posted 14 May 2018 - 01:33

Or the cut sac length may be more effective for fill capacity in relation to the suction created by the pressure bar.

One of the pro repair folks or pen history folks probably knows.

I haven't had much burping from my lever fillers. I usually hold those pens nib up in hand for a minute before I start writing. It lets air in the sac warm & pre-burp.
Can even do this in a shop before signing an invoice, just pull out the pen early and hold it.

#167 madeline

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 22:36

Thank you everyone for the remarkable advice packed into this thread!  My first re-sac was a success and my new/old Blue Estie is now back on the road and pouring its words onto paper.  It was very exciting to repair my first pen!  I was a bit lucky in that this Esterbrook gave up its section very easily, and the pieces of its old sac were not hard to dislodge. Thank you, pajaro and cattar for your reassurance about sac length.  Indeed, that did seem to work out.

 

In addition to this thread, I am also indebted to OcalaFlGuy for recommending (and describing) how to pressure test a newly installed sac. Although I realized the importance of that, it was very helpful to find tips on how to do it.

 

Thank you, all !!!   :) 


Moderation in everything, including moderation.     

                                                                                     --Mark Twain







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