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Edison Nouveau Premiere


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62 replies to this topic

#1 anaximander

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 20:37

I just received my Edison Nouveau Premiere in the mail and I'm afraid I can't wait to write a preliminary review. For those who don't know, the Edison Nouveau Premiere is a collaborative effort between Brian Gray of the Edison Pen Company and Brian Goulet of the Goulet Pen Company. The design of the pens was also influenced by the participants in Brian and Rachel Goulet's weekly "Write Time @ 9" webcast. This process was fun! And hysterically funny. Or at least we all seemed to think so at the time. It was late.

First Impressions


Posted Image

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The pen arrived very well packaged and reclining comfortably in a box finished in a sort of red-brown faux (I hope) alligator. Finishes that resemble dead animals aren't my thing, but I didn't buy this for the box.

The pen comes with a letter signed by its two creators. Nice touch! You also get one of the recently re-designed Goulet Pens bookmarks.


Appearance & Design

The design is sleek, modern, and understated. The combination of black and silver is a favorite of mine. It speaks of elegance without bling. The clip (which, incidentally, was the focus of much of the hilarity on the above-mentioned online discussion) is tapered to mirror the taper of the pen's ends. It is adorned with a sort of "swish" mark (see picture below) that carries the design theme of tapering even further. This small detail also adds a bit of zest to a design that could be seen as cold. The satin finish also provides a note of softness.


Posted Image


The pen is neatly marked on the barrel with the make and model of the pen. I played with this photo a bit to make the imprint show up. It's more subtle in real life. Incidentally, "Edison Nouveau" is the name for what the Brians hope will be a line of pens, while "Premiere" refers to this specific model.

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Construction & Quality

This is a very solid, well-made pen. Brian Gray is known for his craftsmanship and this pen is no exception.


Weight & Dimensions

This a really long pen. I've photographed it 'twixt a TWSBI and a Pelikan 400 to give a general idea of size.

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Capped, it's 6-7/8" long. Uncapped, 5-1/16". The cap does post, but it posts very high, giving a posted length of 6-3/4". With a pen this size, which is big by my standards (I'm a Pelikan 400 kinda guy), I wouldn't want to post. Also, I'd be a little afraid of what frequent posting might do to the satin finish.

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The pen is made out of acrylic, but the satin finish gives it a feeling of warmth and softness that resembles ebonite. I believe this was Brian Gray's intent, since producing an actual ebonite pen at the desired price point would have been difficult.

While large by my standards, it's small by those of Brian Gray, who mostly makes rather substantial pens. But since he makes them out of light materials, I still find Edison pens to be very "hand-friendly." As with most of his pens, the Premiere has a slightly convex section, which I find very ergonomic. I haven't had time yet to do a long writing session with this pen, but the similar section on my Edison Pearl makes it one of my favorites for extended writing.


Nib & Performance

I ordered my Premiere with a fine, steel nib. Other options are available in steel and in gold. Due to the high price of gold right now, the gold nibs are a lot more expensive. I kind of prefer steel anyway (weird, I know). The steel nibs are Iridium Point Germany (IPG) nibs, but unlike previously available nibs from Brian Gray, they are marked with the Edison light-bulb logo. The logo seems like a small thing, but I think it's a very nice touch. The nib is silver-colored to match the clip.

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I've inked the pen with J. Herbin Pearle Noir and find that it writes a very smooth, wet line that is a little on the broader side of fine. The line width is almost identical to that of a modern Pelikan F steel nib. There's a tiny bit of feedback, just enough to remind you that you're not playing air hockey. (Note: I'm writing this review having tried only one ink in this pen. Pearle Noir is a free-flowing and lubricating ink, so you might take that into account as you read.) It will also write upside down if you want an extra-fine line.

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You don't have to spend much time on FPN to learn that Brian Gray is known for making gorgeous pens and for providing extraordinary customer service. What isn't mentioned as much is that he knows his nibs. I'm not at all surprised that this one is very good. His nib units are easily interchangeable, like Pelikans and Esterbrooks, so if I decide want to get a cursive italic from him later, I can do that.

Filling System

c/c filler with converter included. You could probably make it into an eyedropper if you wanted.

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Cost & Value


The Edison Nouveau Premiere with steel nib is available at Goulet Pens for $150. That's at least $100 less than getting a custom pen from Brian Gray. This is Edison goodness for a very fair price. As I understand it, this is Brian Gray's first foray into the realm of non-custom pens, so here we have economies of scale doing their thing. To my mind, this is a fantastic value. So for all of you who have drooled over Edison pens, but have never taken the plunge because of the prcie, here's your chance.

Conclusions

Overall, I'm very happy with my purchase. The pen is beautiful and has a great hand-feel, and the nib is excellent. I'd definitely recommend this to my friends.

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Edited by anaximander, 14 March 2011 - 23:55.


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#2 PeppWaves03

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 20:44

Nice review, would you mind comparing it against your other two pens in the picture?

#3 RedSox04

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 20:51

is the clip woobly at all?
I love the edison marking on the pen, gives it a vintage feel
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#4 ThirdeYe

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 20:57

That looks so much like a Sheaffer Balance to me... (not that that's a bad thing!) I like the subtlety of the black/silver as well, and I like how the brand/name are engraved into the barrel. Do you feel like it's on par or better than your Pelikan M400? That was another higher end pen I have been lusting over.

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#5 Thornton

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 21:04

Superb review, Anaximander. Rachel and the Brian G's (not a bad name for a band) did an excellent job designing this pen. The little details like the light bulb nib and barrel imprint help make the pen unique. The black satin finish does remind me of ebonite which is a huge plus in my book.

My only concern is the size. I prefer small to medium size pens in general and this might be a tad large for my tastes. Still mulling over my purchase decision, but this review was most helpful.
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#6 jde

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 21:20

Very nice to hear about this pen. Thanks for putting this lovely review together!

<snip>
The steel nibs are Iridium Point Germany (IPG) nibs, but unlike previously available nibs from Brian Gray, they are marked with the Edison light-bulb logo. The logo seems like a small thing, but I think it's a very nice touch.


Woa! Not a small thing at all! That's outstanding in my book. Part of the fun in a pen is the logo. And don't ya like the Edison logo? Posted Image


<snip>
Cost & Value


The Edison Nouveau Premiere with steel nib is available at Goulet Pens for $150. That's at least $100 less than getting a custom pen from Brian Gray.



FYI: the Edison Mina can be had for $200 with a steel nib.

Edited by jde, 14 March 2011 - 21:21.

 
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#7 Hennypenny

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 22:23

LOVE the clip -- at last, something a bit out of the ordinary in clips!

HP
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#8 anaximander

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 22:51

To address a few questions that have come up:

RedSox04, the clip is not wobbly. I'd say it has an average and appropriate level of spring.

Derek and PeppWaves03, I feel a little like comparisons to either the TWSBI or the Pelikan are kind of apples-and-oranges. I only included these pens in the picture because they're commonly owned, so they make a nice reference for size comparison. The TWISBI is at a much lower price point. It's a great pen and an amazing bargain. It's much larger and heavier than the Edison Nouveau Premiere. A very different kind of pen altogether.

The Pelikan 400 series (in which I include the modern M400 as well as the 1950s 400 pictured in the size comparison shot) is a truly extraordinary line of pens. If I had to pick a single favorite pen model, this would be it. You'll pay more for one of these than you would the Edison. The additional money will get you a great piston-filling system, a very large ink capacity, and most likely a really amazing nib.

jde, thanks for the correction about the Edison Mina. I'd forgotten that it sells for less than most of the other Edison models.

#9 GouletPens

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 23:05

Thank you very much for the thorough, detailed, and very picture-heavy review! I've been in love with this pen all along the way, but then I'm more than a little biased! It's great to see an unbiased review of it :thumbup: We've been dying to get these new nibs in, and we're still waiting on all of them (except the steel fines, which have obviously come in already). Everything has turned out as well as I'd hoped or better. Brian, Rachel and I are all quite happy with the final pens, and we're excited to start seeing reviews like this as people get the pens in their hands.

#10 bgray

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 23:35

Thanks for posting this. We've been eager to get some feedback on the pen.

//The pen is made out of acrylic, but the satin finish gives it a feeling of warmth and softness that resembles ebonite. I believe this was Brian Gray's intent, since producing an actual ebonite pen at the desired price point would have been difficult.//

Actually, this is what I call my "faux" ebonite. It's an acrylic that is softer than most. I honestly can't tell the difference between this and ebonite without smelling. Especially when it's done in a satin finish. This is why we chose it.

And no, the boxes are not made from alligator skin! Besides my own beliefs, I couldn't afford it, I'm sure!

Edited by bgray, 14 March 2011 - 23:35.


#11 Frank_Federalist_Pens

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 23:48

Thanks for posting this. We've been eager to get some feedback on the pen.

//The pen is made out of acrylic, but the satin finish gives it a feeling of warmth and softness that resembles ebonite. I believe this was Brian Gray's intent, since producing an actual ebonite pen at the desired price point would have been difficult.//

Actually, this is what I call my "faux" ebonite. It's an acrylic that is softer than most. I honestly can't tell the difference between this and ebonite without smelling. Especially when it's done in a satin finish. This is why we chose it.

And no, the boxes are not made from alligator skin! Besides my own beliefs, I couldn't afford it, I'm sure!


Brian (and Brian!),

Congrats on a great collaboration, and a great looking pen!
It's good to see an Edison pen that is easily accessible to more people!

Regards,
Frank

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#12 Brian C

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 01:11

Uhhhhhn...looks like another non Edison or Parker 51 is going to have to be sacrificed.

#13 turban1

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 15:24

And no, the boxes are not made from alligator skin! Besides my own beliefs, I couldn't afford it, I'm sure!


The Edison cobber's tellin' it fair dinkum, mate. 'Ere in North Oz, we harvest crocs for all the major pen-makers and it's bloody dangerous work, I can tell ye true. My cousin, Blue, 'ad to get 'is MB 149 reground into an oblique so's he could write with his left hand 'cuz a 32-foot croc et his right one an' 'e can't sign a check usin''is new hook. Nah, all you fancy-pants pen collectors think them posh cases are plastic, but they're crocodile skin. I'll bet you think those cutsie pen boxes from China are covered in fake panda fur too.

They all do it except for them Edison blokes - too bleedin' principled and decent to pay us to skin one o' them endangered species that'll kill you soon as look at ye. Wot can ye do with people like that, eh? Fake croc skin - blimey, wot is the world coming to?
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#14 nardo800

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 17:01

Just wondering; are the nibs on this model user-interchangeable with the selection of (JoWo, I think) nibs from Edison's custom series, or is it a different section?

Edited by nardo800, 15 March 2011 - 17:07.


#15 anaximander

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 21:28

First, I notice that I mistyped a vital number in my review. The capped length of the Edison Nouveau Premiere is 5-7/8", NOT 6-7/8".

I also think that I mis-represented its size in another way. Looking at it capped in comparison to the Pelikan 400, the ENP looks enormous. But a lot of that length is in the cap. A visual comparison with the Pelikan when both are uncapped tells a very different story:

Posted Image

So if Thornton or others are concerned that the pen will be too big, I wouldn't worry. Assuming that you don't post it, of course.

#16 FrankB

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 22:00

Thanks for this review. I was also very curious to see some reactions to this new pen.

I appreciate your correction on the size of the Goulet pen. I am concerned now that the pen is too small. But I do so like the material. I have several of the older Danitrio raw ebonite pens and I love the aesthetics and simplicity of that material. It is good to know that the raw ebonite look and feel can be replicated.

Edited: This model seems to be the same size and configuration as the Herald. Is this pen like the Herald, or is it larger? Does anyone know?

Edited by FrankB, 16 March 2011 - 02:27.


#17 ethernautrix

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 22:56

Oo, thanks for the thorough review!

I'm glad to know that the steel nibs have the Edison logo on them. I like it!

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#18 bgray

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 23:38

Just wondering; are the nibs on this model user-interchangeable with the selection of (JoWo, I think) nibs from Edison's custom series, or is it a different section?


Yes, these nibs are interchangeable with any Edison Pen, except the Mina, which uses a smaller nib.

Thanks.

#19 Spector

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 00:20

wow it looks like amazing value!
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#20 Thornton

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 00:31

First, I notice that I mistyped a vital number in my review. The capped length of the Edison Nouveau Premiere is 5-7/8", NOT 6-7/8".

I also think that I mis-represented its size in another way. Looking at it capped in comparison to the Pelikan 400, the ENP looks enormous. But a lot of that length is in the cap. A visual comparison with the Pelikan when both are uncapped tells a very different story:

Posted Image

So if Thornton or others are concerned that the pen will be too big, I wouldn't worry. Assuming that you don't post it, of course.


That does make a big difference. I'm definitely more inclined to go ahead with a purchase now. Thanks again!
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