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Parker 51 Vacumatic


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#21 pelman

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 12:39

I have got a "51" vacumatic on the way (though not as beautiful as yours). I can't wait to try it. Thanks for the review.

#22 mstone

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 21:03

I think that the subtle never mentioned reason ( I have two years in FPN ) for many of us choosing the vacumatic system over the aerometric is that in the late you have to shake it horizontaly while squizing for filling,

? I don't think I've ever shaken my aero 51.

#23 penrivers

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 23:53

I think that the subtle never mentioned reason ( I have two years in FPN ) for many of us choosing the vacumatic system over the aerometric is that in the late you have to shake it horizontaly while squizing for filling,

? I don't think I've ever shaken my aero 51.

Oh, my bad english, I wish to said....what?..well, I have to move horizontaly my thumb finger against the body
of the aereometric mechanism, shaken imperceptibly the barrel in an horizontal line, no equilibrium,you can move the bottle and spread the ink, a person with Parkinson illnes will find dificult this system. Instead in the button system the filling is so easy. And it hapens generally more or less wit every aereometric squizing filling fountain pen system in the world. Definitelly I dont like it. Greetings.

Edited by penrivers, 26 November 2010 - 03:39.


#24 Kaych

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 21:01

Wow! The photography is amazing with this review and I'm a huge fan of the Parker 51 both aerometric and Vac. Like you, when I got my first one, I was underwhelmed with 51's appearance. Over time the pen grew on me and I now have 17 of them:). I find 51s get the heaviest use in my collection.


Thanks! I think the 51 is just one of those pens where simplicity wins out. We are so used to seeing flashy pens, that the minimalism of the 51 seems to pale in comparison. But once we get used to the look we find that simple is sometimes better.

Oh, my bad english, I wish to said....what?..well, I have to move horizontaly my thumb finger against the body
of the aereometric mechanism, shaken imperceptibly the barrel in an horizontal line, no equilibrium,you can move the bottle and spread the ink, a person with Parkinson illnes will find dificult this system. Instead in the button system the filling is so easy. And it hapens generally more or less wit every aereometric squizing filling fountain pen system in the world. Definitelly I dont like it. Greetings.


If I understand correctly, the fact that you have to press the aerometric filler horizontally with your thumb makes it harder to keep it stable especially for people with diseases like Parkinson's. I never really thought about things like that. It wold be interesting to find out which filler is better for people with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome or repetitive strain injuries, especially since FPs are recommended with people with those conditions.
DESIDERANTES MELIOREM PATRIAM

#25 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 18:24

:thumbup: I am not usually a fan of p51 but this is one is an exception. Enjoy your pen
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time
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#26 tonysingh

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 21:33

Lovely review.

#27 cooltouch

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 08:50

Nice review. I own several Vacumatics, including an earlier version of the subject pen (Cordovan brown, gold-filled cap, but older style clip with blue diamond and no "Parker" on the cap band), and this question of emptying the pen's reservoir came up years ago in a forum that I no longer recall back when I was actively collecting. One respondent explained that to drain a Vacumatic, you depress the plunger very slowly and it will empty the reservoir. I tried this, and wow. It worked. Now, if you're talking about getting every last trace of ink out of the pen, then it doesn't matter what type of fill system is being used -- it takes many flushes before you'll get a clear discharge from the pen's reservoir -- or at least that's been my experience.

Anyway, give it a try and see if you don't get a goodly volume of ink being expelled from your pen just be slowly depressing the plunger.

Edited by cooltouch, 03 December 2010 - 10:47.

Michael

#28 Kaych

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 18:58

Nice review. I own several Vacumatics, including an earlier version of the subject pen (Cordovan brown, gold-filled cap, but older style clip with blue diamond and no "Parker" on the cap band), and this question of emptying the pen's reservoir came up years ago in a forum that I no longer recall back when I was actively collecting. One respondent explained that to drain a Vacumatic, you depress the plunger very slowly and it will empty the reservoir. I tried this, and wow. It worked. Now, if you're talking about getting every last trace of ink out of the pen, then it doesn't matter what type of fill system is being used -- it takes many flushes before you'll get a clear discharge from the pen's reservoir -- or at least that's been my experience.

Anyway, give it a try and see if you don't get a goodly volume of ink being expelled from your pen just be slowly depressing the plunger.


Next time I change inks I'll definitely give this a try. Thanks for the tip. :thumbup:
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#29 kathleen

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 20:30

Just two days ago I visited my favorite dusty shop, filled with secondhand goods; I found two burgundy colored Parker "51" pens. Each priced $30. I examined each carefully and thought I should give the Parker "51" a try. So many in the FPN love Parker.
Two to choose from, I bought the one with the lustraloy cap, the other pen having a shiny chrome cap with some scratches was not as attractive.

Each pen had a "squeeze" filling mechanism with pliable ink sac.
This week I also received a Black Esterbrook Deluxe, in near mint condition with a #2668 nib, won on ebay for 22.90 + shipping.
Which pen do I prefer?
Hands down my Esterbrook! The ink flow is much better in my Esterbrook, I have flushed and flushed the Parker and with the same ink it is a much drier writer. I prefer the look of my Esties, liking the fully visible nib, as opposed to the hooded nib on the Parker. I can not even tell what nib designation the Parker has, it feels like a medium - fine nib. My Esterbrook has interchangeable nibs and an easily replaced sac. My Esterbrook with a minimum of care will outlast my lifetime and perhaps that of my children.
For like $ I will continue my love affair with the Esties. The classic Parker "51" caught my eye, but we shall enjoy only a fling, my heart belongs to Esterbrook. Esterbrook was my father's pen of choice, I should never have strayed.
Added note: Parker definitely produces quality pens. While I seldom use a ballpoint, since rediscovering the joy of flowing ink from a fountain pen, whenever I must use a ballpoint, I think there is none so fine as the Parker T-Ball Jotter with regular or gel ink refill.
Photo: Parker "51" and Esterbrook Deluxe Similar in looks, Parker has distinctive arrow clip, Esterbrook has dressy black ring and jet black jewel on cap and barrel.

Edited by kathleen, 03 December 2010 - 21:18.

"Be glad of life because it gives you the chance to love and to work and to play and to look up at the stars" ~Henry Van Dyke

Trying to rescue and restore all the beautiful Esties to their purpose.

#30 cooltouch

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 21:09

Hey Kathleen, I agree with your choice of ballpoint pens. The T-Ball Jotter has been a favorite of mine since I was in grade school in the 60s. But if I have to use a ball pen, I prefer roller ball because they feel more like fountain pens.

About your Parker 51 -- I have owned several, and my experience has been that some can be dry writers while others will produce a good, wet line. So, it may be your pen could use a nib/feed adjustment or a good and thorough cleaning. Actually, my favorite hooded nib Parker in terms of writing quality is a "lowly" 21. I find the 21 aerometric to be just as fine a pen as the more expensive 51s.

I can relate to your passion for Esterbrooks -- I own a couple myself (and have owned quite a few in the past), and I enjoy mine. But I don't have a high level of loyalty for any one brand. Not when I have Sheaffers and Pelikans and Parkers, etc., that write just as well, if not better.
Michael

#31 ScottieDarin

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 16:07

I don't yet own a vacumatic Parker 51, but I own two aerometrics. 

Love them at first sight. The subtlety and low-profile attempt of the design is, in my opinion, the best.

Can't stop using them. 

Got them a little over 300 USD, but if anyone picks them up, they will just assume I bought them a month ago! 






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