Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Edison Urushi Pearl Le


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Painterspal

Painterspal

    Addicted to urushi

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Location:Suffolk, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:00

The Edison Urushi Pearl LE

Posted Image

Posted Image

Iím sure that, for most FPN visitors, Brian Grayís name will be instantly familiar as the man behind Edison pens. His range of handmade, made to order, resin and ebonite creations occupy a comparatively rare niche in these days of mass production, and represent a genuine alternative for someone wanting something Ďdifferentí, with the added option of ordering an entirely bespoke pen, made to your personal specification.

At the beginning of 2010 I was thinking seriously about buying an Edison, and had got as far as having some initial discussions with Brian, but hadnít quite been tempted enough to place an order. For me, Brianís pens compete with offerings from the likes of Danitrio and Nakaya, whose pens have similar virtues, but add the advantage of Urushi which, for me at least, takes them to another level. Much as I like resin, if I want a hand made pen, the material of choice is ebonite, which has a warmth and tactility that plastic can never match (I even like the smell!). And, although I like raw ebonite pens, the Urushi finish adds a beauty and durability that transforms these humble objects into something that are both wonderfully utilitarian and, quite simply, works of art.

In the spring of this year I moved house and somehow managed to take my eye off the ball, totally missing Brianís announcement of his limited edition of Edison Pearl Urushi pens, the first product of a new collaboration with Ernest Shin, a specialist Urushi artist and craftsman. Not surprisingly, all 20 pens were quickly reserved, so instead of the thrill of anticipation enjoyed by those who had signed up, I had to make do with following the project, green eyed and jealous, on Brianís blog. Fast forward to September and, unexpectedly, one of these pens shows up on the FPN for sale listing. I prevaricate for hours, funds already stretched to the limit, then send a reluctant enquiry, expecting the pen to be sold. I was astonished to find it wasnít, and a few days later, itís in my hand.

Much has already been written about the Edison Pearl, itís been reviewed frequently and is a popular product. Before the pen arrived, I was quite worried about how well Iíd get on with it. Iíd read that Brian had been partly influenced by the Nakaya Piccolo when he developed the design for the Pearl. The Piccolo is the smallest of the Nakaya range and a pen about which I have mixed feelings. While I like its crisp lines, I find itís only just long enough to be comfortable, and the short section doesnít completely agree with me either. The seller had sited size as the reason for the sale of the Pearl and, I although I have small hands, I worried that it would also be too small for me.

From the moment I first picked it up, I realised that my fears were groundless. The barrel is about 1cm longer than the Piccolo and this makes a massive difference to the feel of the pen. The section is a similar length but the shape is far more comfortable. The whole size thing is actually quite interesting. The Pearl, is a small pen compared to other pens of this type - with the exception of the Piccolo my Nakayas and Danitrios are all significantly bigger - but this is deceptive. Itís actually a pretty substantial pen, similar in length to the MB 146, Pelikan M600 and Aurora Optima, and wider than any of them.

The Edison Urushi Pearl compared to a Nakaya Piccolo.

Posted Image

But while the pen is a nice size for me, it isnít excessively heavy. Ebonite is a light material, but the addition of the lacquer has made this edition of the Pearl slightly heavier than the figures quoted on Brianís website, which for me means it provides an ideal weight and balance. Capped it weighs 20g, while uncapped itís about 15g Ė very similar to my workhorse Aurora Optima. The cap isnít designed to be posted, which suits me fine. Construction is of a very high quality, fit and finish are immaculate, and the shape and proportions of the pen are very satisfying Ė to my eye more harmonious than the Piccolo.

The Urushi Pearl can be used in converter or eyedropper mode, which I see as another advantage over the competing Nakaya, which requires a degree of Heath-Robinson-style modification to work in the latter mode. The nib is an extremely nice, single colour 18K .7 stub, ground by Brian himself. Initially, I found it a tad too crisp for my writing style, but a quick momentís work has transformed it, retaining virtually all the line variation but making it smoother and more forgiving, much better suited to my style. Ink flow is on the wet side of average and, again, just about perfect for me.

As for the Urushi itself, I think pictures, even my inadequate efforts, speak louder than any words can. Ernestís work is simply outstanding and the flame-like, organic, Karanuri pattern really sets this pen apart from anything else Iíve encountered. This truly is a dream pen and Iíll be watching out for more Edison/Shin collaborations in the future, though theyíll have to go some to improve on this one (and my bank balance will need to recover first).

In conclusion, I have to say, this pen is simply outstanding. About the only negative thing I can think of is that the box it comes in, while entirely adequate, seems somehow unworthy of such a stunning product.

I guess, for many, the price will seem excessive and it was certainly eye-watering for me. But compared to many expensive so-called limited editions that run to hundreds, or even thousands of units (MB springs to mind), these seem fairly priced, considering the craftsmanship involved.

Ernest Shin's signature and the edition number.

Posted Image

Posted Image


Edited by Painterspal, 16 October 2010 - 06:11.

D A N i T R i O f e l l o w s h i p

Sponsored Content

#2 Yuki Onitsura

Yuki Onitsura

    I ink, therefore I am

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:28

Fantastic photos of a very nice pen! It's also nice that you've compared it to the Nakaya Piccolo since the two are quite similar in shape. Bravo!

Yuki
Posted Image
Follow me on twitter! @crypticjunky

~And the words, they're everything and nothing. I want to search for her in the offhand remarks.~

#3 kushbaby

kushbaby

    We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,933 posts
  • Location:San Antonio, Texas, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 07:04

Oh my goodness, that is *dangerously* beautiful...

:puddle: :puddle: :puddle:
__________________
Kushbaby

I like eating peanuts with chopsticks...

#4 hari317

hari317

    Classic

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,601 posts
  • Location:Mumbai, INDIA
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 07:20

Superb photos, the pen looks most beautiful in your photos, even better than the stock ones IMHO. Enjoy it in good health.
In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#5 777

777

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,021 posts
  • Location:Big Sandy, Tennessee
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 16:39

Great review! I saw that one up for sale. Way far out of my kind of buying range... I'm glad it's found a new owner to appreciate its beauty!

Regards,
777

Need a pen repaired or a nib re-ground? I'd love to help you out.


Posted Image


Colossians 3:17 - And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.


#6 kaisede

kaisede

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,549 posts

Posted 16 October 2010 - 17:03

I saw this pen in person at the NYC pen show. It is a beauty.

Thanks for the review. Enjoy your pen.

Andy

#7 Aysedasi

Aysedasi

    24 Heures du Mans and Oblique Addict

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,075 posts
  • Location:New Forest, England
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 21:09

Can someone please delete this thread?

No-one should be allowed to post a photo of a pen that makes me feel this envious........ :notworthy1:

#8 kushbaby

kushbaby

    We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,933 posts
  • Location:San Antonio, Texas, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2010 - 21:31

Can someone please delete this thread?

No-one should be allowed to post a photo of a pen that makes me feel this envious........ :notworthy1:


+1

:bonk:
__________________
Kushbaby

I like eating peanuts with chopsticks...

#9 jigesh

jigesh

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 739 posts
  • Location:Hopewell Junction, New York

Posted 16 October 2010 - 23:19

I saw this pen in person at the NYC pen show. It is a beauty....


Me too, at Ern's desk. Perfect craftsmanship all around. Very pleasant feel in the hand. Sorry I missed the project (and can't wait for the next one!)

Great review and excellent pictures (natural day light is the best, isn't it?)...

Edited by jigesh, 16 October 2010 - 23:19.


#10 kuno

kuno

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 403 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 October 2010 - 05:01

Wow, I didn't know Urushi could even look like that.

#11 tanalasta

tanalasta

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,528 posts
  • Location:Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 17 October 2010 - 13:06

Exceptional photos and review. :thumbup:

Congratulations on such a beautiful pen. I have a plain ol' Celluloid pearl which I'd previously reviewed and love Brian's work also. But your pen takes the Pearl to a whole new level.
In Rotation: MB 146 (EF), Noodler's Ahab bumblebee, Edison Pearl (F), Sailor ProGear (N-MF)
In storage: MB 149 (18k EF), TWSBI 540 (B), ST Dupont Olympio XL (EF), MB Dumas (B stub), Waterman Preface (ST), Edison Pearl (0.5mm CI), Noodler's Ahab clear, Pilot VP (M), Danitrio Densho (F), Aurora Optima (F), Lamy 2000 (F), Visconti Homo Sapiens (stub)

#12 rhk

rhk

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 388 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 15:51

Mine is 'into foreign customs' at the moment.... Anyway, if they want to charge me, I hope they are quick! Ruud

#13 Doug C

Doug C

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,415 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 19:24

I just got mine yesterday (15/20), and while I had planned on doing a review of it, there is nothing more I can add (especially when it comes to your photos-there is no way I could do justice to yours).

I also own a Piccolo, and while they feel different, there is a familiar feeling with the Pearl.

I also ordered the .7 stub, and had an intial issue with a little too much toothiness from the nib (it felt like it was going to cut the paper). It would be much rougher pushing the nib than in other directions. I sent a note to Brian, letting him know (after the fact) that I am a left handed underwriter. This means I am almost always pushing the nib instead of pulling.

While I was playing with the pen, wanting it to write better (the flow was fine, and there was no skipping at all), I decided to try the old cardboard box trick.

I have tried this without much success over the years, but imagine my surprise when it did a great deal to smooth out the nib (and since I just sent the note to Brian yesterday-a Saturday, by the time he reads it, it will be a moot point). It must have been just a tiny bit of residue or imperfection that was worn away.

What is really amazing is that, compared to my other Edison, which is a lavender ebonite Huron (I'll post pictures of them side by side to show the beauty of Edison's), is how differently the nibs feel. While the Huron is a .9 stub, it is fairly stiff, but the little difference in subtracting two little digits changes the .7 nib to a flexible nib.

I like having different feels to my nibs, and I'm very happy that I made the decision to go with this nib now.

I know that Brian and Ernest are working on a new project, which is bad news for anyone that owns this pen...............at least financially.

Nakaya Piccolo, Edison Pearl Urushi, Edison Herald Lavender ebonite Huron Bulb Filler.

Posted Image

Edited by Doug C, 17 October 2010 - 19:59.

the Danitrio Fellowship

#14 Aysedasi

Aysedasi

    24 Heures du Mans and Oblique Addict

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,075 posts
  • Location:New Forest, England
  • Flag:

Posted 17 October 2010 - 20:53

Man, it just has to be my turn to win the lottery next weekend.......... :crybaby:

#15 Hennypenny

Hennypenny

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 684 posts

Posted 17 October 2010 - 21:12

I'm glad to see someone posted a review of this pen at last. It's a genuinely beautiful pen -- and deserves an honest evaluation, which I think you've given it. In my book, it's probably as close to perfection as a pen can get, since it's both stunningly beautiful and an outstanding writer. Kudos to Brian and Ernest (and to you for your good taste!). HP
The sky IS falling. C. Little

#16 Painterspal

Painterspal

    Addicted to urushi

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Location:Suffolk, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 20 October 2010 - 21:45

Thanks to all for the positive feedback - much appreciated.
D A N i T R i O f e l l o w s h i p

#17 Doug C

Doug C

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,415 posts

Posted 20 October 2010 - 23:33

I'm glad to see someone posted a review of this pen at last. It's a genuinely beautiful pen -- and deserves an honest evaluation, which I think you've given it. In my book, it's probably as close to perfection as a pen can get, since it's both stunningly beautiful and an outstanding writer. Kudos to Brian and Ernest (and to you for your good taste!). HP




I have to say that, after telling Brian I had some issues with the nib on my L.E> Pearl, and after telling him that I had asked (not told) him that I planned to do a review of the pen, his attitude was the same; describe how you feel about the pen,be honest, and we will deal with the issues after the fact.
That says volumes; that you will not be out of luck with the quality of the writing experience.
This is consistent with the other pen I purchased from him; his attitude is that you must be happy, whether it is a $300 pen or a $1000 pen.


No worries on my part.

Enjoy the quality experience....
Doug.
the Danitrio Fellowship

#18 Doug C

Doug C

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,415 posts

Posted 23 October 2010 - 22:40

I'm glad to see someone posted a review of this pen at last. It's a genuinely beautiful pen -- and deserves an honest evaluation, which I think you've given it. In my book, it's probably as close to perfection as a pen can get, since it's both stunningly beautiful and an outstanding writer. Kudos to Brian and Ernest (and to you for your good taste!). HP




I have to say that, after telling Brian I had some issues with the nib on my L.E> Pearl, and after telling him that I had asked (not told) him that I planned to do a review of the pen, his attitude was the same; describe how you feel about the pen,be honest, and we will deal with the issues after the fact.
That says volumes; that you will not be out of luck with the quality of the writing experience.
This is consistent with the other pen I purchased from him; his attitude is that you must be happy, whether it is a $300 pen or a $1000 pen.


No worries on my part.

Enjoy the quality experience....
Doug.




I am happy to say that after the 'cardboard trick', which in all honesty only works with nib requests that are a little out of the ordinary (i.e. very fine nibs), I am now very happy with the performance of the nib. This is not to denigrate Brian's response to my issue; He was perfectly willing to do whatever it took to make the nib right. It just so happens that this trick in all of the time I have tried it, actually worked in this instance.
I'm a happy guy, and this continues to be one of the top 3 most beautiful pens I own.


Just a wonderful pen.
the Danitrio Fellowship






Sponsored Content




|