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Sailor Fude Pen 40


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27 replies to this topic

#1 Bruno_Taut

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 03:10

Pen review of the Sailor Fude Pen 40.

This is a very special, and very East Asian pen. Fude pens, as they are called in Japan, have their nibs bended up at a certain sharp angle. By doing this, the user has the possibility of choosing the line width by changing the angle between pen and paper. On top of that, at a certain inclination, a horizontal line drawn with this nib is very wide, while the vertical line remains thin.

Only some Chinese companies and Sailor in Japan manufactures this type of nib. The waverly nib Pilot offers does not have these characteristics. Sailor, on its side, makes three cheap pens with these nibs. Two of them have them bended at 55 degrees. This one reviewed here has it at 40 deg. This company also produces a golden fude nib for more upscale pens.

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1. Appearance and design. (6.5/10)
This pen is made entirely of plastic and does nothing to hide it. It has no clip to attach the pen to a pocket, but a notch on the cap to keep it from rolling. The cap screws to the barrel.


This is a surprisingly long pen. It seems to be made for the purpose of using it on a desk, and not to carry it around.


2. Construction and quality. (8/10)
Despite its cheap price and appearance, this pen seems to be well made. Nothing is loose and everything fits well.


3. Weight and dimensions. (7.5/10)
As I mentioned before, this is a long pen. But made in plastic, it is light and well balanced, especially unposted.

Dimensions:
Diameter: 13.0 mm.
Length capped: 169 mm.
Length uncapped: 150 mm.
Length posted: 191 mm.
Weight: 14 g.


This is a big pen and it might be inconvenient to carry it around. However, this is not a usual pen and few people would use it as a daily writer. For that purpose, Sailor makes a smaller torpedo-like fude pen.


4. Nib and writing performance. (9.0/10)
This pen’s nib is, once again, the raison d’être of this pen. It is bended upwards at an angle of 40 degrees to allow the user to write with different line widths.—from extra fine to extra coarse. Its purpose is to write Chinese characters with the line variation a brush provides naturally.

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The nib is made of stainless steel. Untipped, rigid, very wet. And very smooth.

For those of us who do not write Chinese ideograms, this pen is more suitable for drawing and more creative tasks. It is fun to use.


5. Filling system and maintenance. (8.0/10)
A cheap pen, but accepts Sailor cartridges and converters. Its main problem is the limited capacity of those in a very wet pen. I see no major problem in making it an eyedropper, and then the pen would have a huge ink deposit.

Cleaning this pen is very easy. Nib and feeder are easily removed from the section by pulling.


6. Cost and value. (9.0/10)
This is a very specialized pen. So, taken it into consideration, the value is excellent. The cost, less than €10 (JPY 1050, taxes included).


7. Conclusion. (48.0/60=80.0/100)
This pen is fun to use, although it can hardly become a daily writer. It is inexpensive and performs well. The lower scores come in the department of design and appearance—it could certainly be more attractive.

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Cheers,

Iosepus
Bruno_Taut

The contents and pictures of this post belong to the author, here identified as Bruno_Taut or Iosepus

Crónicas Estilográficas: http://estilofilos.blogspot.com/

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#2 watch_art

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 03:35

love it. i need to make one of these, or maybe a Condor style nib...
it's just too cool.

fpn_1432247667__cropped-20150427_0641231 sigpic14481_1.gif vanness.jpg?t=1321916122


#3 lovemy51

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:18

i tried one of these at Maido in S Francisco and like the way it wrote. thx for the review!

PD. ¿quien es Juana y por qué le mataron al marido? :hmm1: ;)

ciao,

#4 watch_art

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:23

okaynow i gota jump in:
ola! como est ta? moo-eh bee-in. gracias por favor.

i don't think whisky helps my spelling skills out at all...

fpn_1432247667__cropped-20150427_0641231 sigpic14481_1.gif vanness.jpg?t=1321916122


#5 lovemy51

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:45

okaynow i gota jump in:
ola! como est ta? moo-eh bee-in. gracias por favor.

i don't think whisky helps my spelling skills out at all...


i can tell you don't teach spanish!!! :roflmho:

... :mellow: but i bet you can correct my execrable english grammar and spelling! :headsmack:

#6 777

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 11:43

I've always wondered what a fude nib is. Thanks for the great review! I'm gonna have to try out one of these nibs eventually.

Need a pen repaired or a nib re-ground? I'd love to help you out.


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Colossians 3:17 - And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.


#7 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 16:52

Excellent review! As many of you know, I collect and use fude with great enjoyment.

Here in the USA jetpens might still have the Sailor Bamboo--I got many of my Chinese fude at isellpens.

I have three of the Sailor Bamboo in differing angles, plus the 1911-lookalike Profit Special Script.

They're wonderful for just plain writing and drawing. Love the handwriting samples.

#8 IWantThat

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 17:15

Excellent review! As many of you know, I collect and use fude with great enjoyment.

Here in the USA jetpens might still have the Sailor Bamboo--I got many of my Chinese fude at isellpens.

I have three of the Sailor Bamboo in differing angles, plus the 1911-lookalike Profit Special Script.

They're wonderful for just plain writing and drawing. Love the handwriting samples.


Is it hard to get used to writing with them if you've never used a specialized nib before? I'm curious about the fude nibs, but hate buy one if I can't write with it.
Tamara

#9 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 18:11

Is it hard to get used to writing with them if you've never used a specialized nib before? I'm curious about the fude nibs, but hate buy one if I can't write with it.


For me it was as easy as breathing and the answer to a long quest for a pen that would give my writing 'character.'

Everyone's different. If you buy one and it doesn't suit you there will be people here to trade with. The price varies from $20 on down---the Hero 86 is $12 or so.

#10 lovemy51

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 22:15

i have the Bookworm (chinese made) with that nib and, to me, makes no significant diff in the writing. what i mean is, i would have to want to write in a different angle or pressing down to spring the nib to be able to get any line variation.

other wise, i can just use this like any other FP.

#11 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 00:08

I have the Bookworm, too. But you knew that of course. :ltcapd:

Of all the fude I own the Sailors are the 'friendliest' to new users---they have no tipping and are consistent wet writers.

#12 Bruno_Taut

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 01:09

After I wrote the review, I started using a Fude 55 (Sailor). The difference is huge. So, I might suggest that you check what angles suits you better.

I am preparing a text comparing both nibs.

Cheers,

Iosepus

Excellent review! As many of you know, I collect and use fude with great enjoyment.

Here in the USA jetpens might still have the Sailor Bamboo--I got many of my Chinese fude at isellpens.

I have three of the Sailor Bamboo in differing angles, plus the 1911-lookalike Profit Special Script.

They're wonderful for just plain writing and drawing. Love the handwriting samples.


Is it hard to get used to writing with them if you've never used a specialized nib before? I'm curious about the fude nibs, but hate buy one if I can't write with it.


Bruno_Taut

The contents and pictures of this post belong to the author, here identified as Bruno_Taut or Iosepus

Crónicas Estilográficas: http://estilofilos.blogspot.com/

#13 troglokev

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 10:52

Is it hard to get used to writing with them if you've never used a specialized nib before? I'm curious about the fude nibs, but hate buy one if I can't write with it.

After I wrote the review, I started using a Fude 55 (Sailor). The difference is huge. So, I might suggest that you check what angles suits you better.

I'll second that comment. The key to getting variation with these nibs is finding the angle at which the pen works, and using it at that angle. Sailor make a few angles (indicated by the number), so finding the one that works best for you is key.

Edited by troglokev, 08 August 2010 - 10:52.


#14 Bruno_Taut

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 10:38

This is my experience with these two nibs:

Posted Image

With the 40-degree nib, writing with a thin line is relatively easy—the angle between pen and paper has to be greater than those 40 degrees. In my case, that is not difficult, and the line variation associated to the pen inclination is easy to achieve.

On the contrary, the 55-degree nib requires a higher angle to draw that same thin line. But higher than those 55-60 degrees, the pen is very perpendicular to the paper and that makes the grip uncomfortable.

So, my writing style is such that I tend to hold the pen at a nearly 55 deg with respect to the paper, which is the optimal angle for the very wide horizontal lines. But these are not convenient for usual writing. Therefore, I rather use the 40-degree Fude Pen –the one I reviewed— and make a conscious effort in making a thick line at 40 degrees than making that conscious effort in writing my usual thin line.

Those are my personal constraints. People who enjoy writing with thick lines –those B or BB or BBB nib people— might choose the opposite strategy.

Some more pics, on my blog.

Cheers,

Iosepus

Edited by Iosepus, 09 August 2010 - 11:30.

Bruno_Taut

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#15 Have Fun

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 09:49

Thanks for the review I haven't seen that shallower angle nib before

I use the Sailor Profit version with the steep angle nib mainly for small sketches thumbnails & house plan doodles. The ability to go from thin to thick lines without changing pens is very useful & at low angle I can paint sections & block in areas. Writing goes from fine to Bold - again useful for headings & notation. Writing line character variation is presentable a bit similar to italic nib but in reverse ie horizontal strokes are bolder than vertical. Orienting the nib sideways to the writing line gives further variation & becomes more normalised character style.

These nibs take some getting used to & need practice. I use Drafting pens so I'm used to holding a pen vertically which helps adjusting to this nib type.

The Profit version is smaller, neat & comfortable to hold & the nib is very smooth. It would be interesting to find out whether a 40deg nib can be fitted to the Profit.

The Nib makes it a great Sign Pen for signing off letters

#16 neselena

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 03:09

This is my experience with these two nibs:

Posted Image

With the 40-degree nib, writing with a thin line is relatively easy—the angle between pen and paper has to be greater than those 40 degrees. In my case, that is not difficult, and the line variation associated to the pen inclination is easy to achieve.

On the contrary, the 55-degree nib requires a higher angle to draw that same thin line. But higher than those 55-60 degrees, the pen is very perpendicular to the paper and that makes the grip uncomfortable.

So, my writing style is such that I tend to hold the pen at a nearly 55 deg with respect to the paper, which is the optimal angle for the very wide horizontal lines. But these are not convenient for usual writing. Therefore, I rather use the 40-degree Fude Pen –the one I reviewed— and make a conscious effort in making a thick line at 40 degrees than making that conscious effort in writing my usual thin line.

Those are my personal constraints. People who enjoy writing with thick lines –those B or BB or BBB nib people— might choose the opposite strategy.

Some more pics, on my blog.

Cheers,

Iosepus




I was debating between 40 degree and 55 and wondered what's the difference
After reading your review, I think 40 would suit me better!
Thanks!

#17 Raiden

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 19:25

Great information. Thanks for the review.

#18 art_ok

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 22:01

Pen review of the Sailor Fude Pen 40.

Which ink did you use in this review? Really nice green! Please, please do not tell me that it was (no longer available) Montblanc Racing Green!

#19 Bruno_Taut

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 22:22

Pen review of the Sailor Fude Pen 40.

Which ink did you use in this review? Really nice green! Please, please do not tell me that it was (no longer available) Montblanc Racing Green!


Sailor Hiroko's Green.

Cheers,

Iosepus
Bruno_Taut

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#20 Lamyliz

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 06:54

Does anyone know if the ink in the cartridges that come with this pen are waterproof?






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