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Schneider Id Fountain Pen


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13 replies to this topic

#1 cubic archon

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 21:47

I just posted this on my stationery/stuff blog.

---

I recently saw these on Cultpens, and thought that I might depart from my usual range of Lamys and try something slightly new. As of time of writing, the description of these pens on the catalog page of Cultpens is simply “Weird”.

Posted Image

It’s an absurd-looking pen, but has a certain charm if you like that sort of thing. The cap is immense – the photos really don’t do it justice – and the clip on it is bizarrely huge as well. (I bought one with green trim, but it is available in a number of colours.) The body is a translucent black plastic which shows the cartridge or convertor. It is overall lighter in weight than one might think, though, yet it’s solid in construction – it doesn’t feel cheap or flimsy at all.

The grip is rubbery and deliberately contoured to encourage a particular sort of hold. There is a flattened dip on the top right for one’s index finger, and underneath, a shallower but wider flattened part for the middle finger. Some people hate this sort of thing but it fits in quite well with how I hold pens. The grip, the weight and the generous but not excessive width lead me to think it would be a good writer for extended periods.

This model has a medium nib, which is a “European” medium i.e. fairly broad, and is also slightly italic. It is pleasantly smooth on the paper and ink flows well, or at least it does now. Originally when first filling it the thing had trouble starting and was writing quite dryly. “Oh gawd,” I thought, “another fifteen quid wasted on a pen I’ll never use,” but being sensible I gave it a good flush and a soak for an extended period with a little washing-up liquid to clean out any gunk from factory or storage or malicious pen pixies, and now it seems fine, at least with Waterman Florida Blue which is what I have in it at the moment.

The iD takes standard international cartridges, and has space for the usual two back to back inside. I ordered a Tombow convertor at the same time for use with bottled ink and this seems effective, in fact a pretty good convertor all told, with a good seal and no air getting in.

Overall, I am happy with this pen. It has a fatter nib than I normally prefer, but it is a nice comfortable writer, and if I didn’t need a rounded fine nib to write in my usual appalling spider scrawl (being fairer to myself here, I also draw bubbles and arrows and diagrams a lot, and a broadish italic nib is not good for that purpose) I could see myself using it regularly. Somebody looking for a relatively inexpensive and comfortable pen for long periods of writing – exams, theses – might find it pretty ideal. Do flush it out first though.

Edited by cubic archon, 24 July 2010 - 22:25.


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#2 777

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 21:58

Thanks for the review. That's an interesting pen which I've never heard of before. Guess I learned something todayPosted Image

Need a pen repaired or a nib re-ground? I'd love to help you out.


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#3 Phormula

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 15:26

Fully agree with you. The ID is a fantastic and relatively inexpensive school pen and the black one is at ease also in business environment, perfect for tasks that require extended periods of writing. Good value for money but definitely not the pen best choice for writing small notes aside of printed text.
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#4 delphi303

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 20:06

Thanks for the Schneider review...

I have a Schneider Base (same medium steel nib as your Id I believe)...

A bit of a hard starter after not being used for a while, but once it gets going, well, no problems...

Both the Id and Base (mine is the gloss black) are big statements of a pen, and a welcome departure from the usual.

Thx again for the review!

#5 Phormula

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 20:17

No, the nib of the ID is different from the one in the Base. I have both and the ID nib is slightly broader and more wet, it has a breather hole, missing in the BASE. I have reviewed the ID as well and if you look at my review you find a comparative picture of the BASE (old and new) and the ID.
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#6 Ian Foster

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 18:15

I just posted this on my stationery/stuff blog.

---

I recently saw these on Cultpens, and thought that I might depart from my usual range of Lamys and try something slightly new. As of time of writing, the description of these pens on the catalog page of Cultpens is simply “Weird”.

Posted Image

It’s an absurd-looking pen, but has a certain charm if you like that sort of thing. The cap is immense – the photos really don’t do it justice – and the clip on it is bizarrely huge as well. (I bought one with green trim, but it is available in a number of colours.) The body is a translucent black plastic which shows the cartridge or convertor. It is overall lighter in weight than one might think, though, yet it’s solid in construction – it doesn’t feel cheap or flimsy at all.

The grip is rubbery and deliberately contoured to encourage a particular sort of hold. There is a flattened dip on the top right for one’s index finger, and underneath, a shallower but wider flattened part for the middle finger. Some people hate this sort of thing but it fits in quite well with how I hold pens. The grip, the weight and the generous but not excessive width lead me to think it would be a good writer for extended periods.

This model has a medium nib, which is a “European” medium i.e. fairly broad, and is also slightly italic. It is pleasantly smooth on the paper and ink flows well, or at least it does now. Originally when first filling it the thing had trouble starting and was writing quite dryly. “Oh gawd,” I thought, “another fifteen quid wasted on a pen I’ll never use,” but being sensible I gave it a good flush and a soak for an extended period with a little washing-up liquid to clean out any gunk from factory or storage or malicious pen pixies, and now it seems fine, at least with Waterman Florida Blue which is what I have in it at the moment.

The iD takes standard international cartridges, and has space for the usual two back to back inside. I ordered a Tombow convertor at the same time for use with bottled ink and this seems effective, in fact a pretty good convertor all told, with a good seal and no air getting in.

Overall, I am happy with this pen. It has a fatter nib than I normally prefer, but it is a nice comfortable writer, and if I didn’t need a rounded fine nib to write in my usual appalling spider scrawl (being fairer to myself here, I also draw bubbles and arrows and diagrams a lot, and a broadish italic nib is not good for that purpose) I could see myself using it regularly. Somebody looking for a relatively inexpensive and comfortable pen for long periods of writing – exams, theses – might find it pretty ideal. Do flush it out first though.



#7 Ian Foster

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 18:17

Please explain: what is a Tombow convertor? Where may I get one? . Sorry for the idiot question - I'm quite new to the fountain pen network

#8 Phormula

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 21:04

The ID can take almost all "international" converters, i.e. all converters that have the size of a standard (big) cartridge, no need to buy a Tombow one if you cannot find it. Just go to your pen shop with the ID and ask for a converter. I am using a "de luxe" one, bought for 4 Euro in a convenience store. I mean it was branded "de luxe" on the bag, but looking at the design I guess it is the standard Schmidt converter that is labeled and sold under many different brands.
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#9 notimetoulouse

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 17:03

Thanks for the review...I want one of these as a workhorse pen, but I'm worried the section is a little a la Lamy Safari? I can't use my right thumb properly after a workplace accident (it now won't bend), and much as I love the Safari's nib and all round writing chutzpah, my hand just can't get on with the triangular section in any way. Has the iD got a grip/section that is triangular at all? If so, this will have to pass. Hope you can help


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#10 Bernardo

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 17:47

Thanks for the review. I own one as well and has been my daily writer for almost a month. It's definitely a pen worth having.



#11 bhaskar94

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 12:42

Hello,I'm from india and I've purchased a Schneider ID pen online..

Unfortunately,there is a B on the nib..may be indicatib broad.. and my writing is pretty bad (very thick) with this pen..

Can I get an M nib for this pen..

the flipkart link for the product: http://www.flipkart....ND8H7YE8WR6DDA



#12 Steffen Larsen

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 17:05

Hello,I'm from india and I've purchased a Schneider ID pen online..

Unfortunately,there is a B on the nib..may be indicatib broad.. and my writing is pretty bad (very thick) with this pen..

Can I get an M nib for this pen..

the flipkart link for the product: http://www.flipkart....ND8H7YE8WR6DDA

I got a replacement medium nib from Cult Pens, and pulling off the old one - a Broad, much too broad - and putting on the new one was no trouble at all with some experience exchanging nibs on Lamys.



#13 Steffen Larsen

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 17:15

The Medium nib IS a bit wide, although not nearly as wide as a Pelikan M400 14K Medium gold nib. The width of the M-nib shouldn't frighten anyone off.

I have two Medium-nibbed Schneider iD's and they both of them write very smoothly indeed, using several different inks. With the fine ink-flow and the very smooth, surprisingly smooth nibs usually offering a dark and saturated line, they are a pleasure to use. No-name converters are just fine.

It is a fat pen, and the grip is somewhat triangular with flattened sides where you put your fingers.  Meaning an easier grip and that you never use excessive force, and this is a long-term advantage.  Narrow and slender pens can be beastly things.


Edited by Steffen Larsen, 24 June 2014 - 17:30.


#14 anup

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 11:51

Thanks for the review...I want one of these as a workhorse pen, but I'm worried the section is a little a la Lamy Safari? I can't use my right thumb properly after a workplace accident (it now won't bend), and much as I love the Safari's nib and all round writing chutzpah, my hand just can't get on with the triangular section in any way. Has the iD got a grip/section that is triangular at all? If so, this will have to pass. Hope you can help

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(saw the date of query later :-)

Edited by a_m, 27 June 2014 - 11:53.

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