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Rohrer & Klingner - Salix


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#1 Sandy1

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 21:47

Kindly adjust the brightness & contrast of your monitor to accurately depict this Gray Scale.
As the patches are neutral gray, the colour on your monitor should also be neutral.
Calibrate Mac LINK
Figure 1.
Grey Scale.
Posted Image
Figure 2.
Paper: HPJ1124 Laser Copy.
Swabs: Waterman Florida Blue. R&K Salix.
Posted Image

Nib-ism Link
Shows relative nib width & wetness

WRITTEN SAMPLES: Moby Dick

Note - Narrow Nibs:
First two rows are 5mm in height; the last two rows are 8mm in height.

Figure 3.
Paper: HPJ1124 Laser Copy.
Posted Image
Figure 4.
Paper: Clairefontaine Triomphe.
Posted Image
Figure 5.
Paper: G Lalo, Verge de France, white.
Posted Image
Figure 6.
Grocery List
Paper: Pulp - from a one-a-day cartoon calendar.
Posted Image
Figure 7.
'Happy'
Paper: Glossy card stock.
Posted Image

OTHER SAMPLES:

Figure 8.
Smear / Dry Time. Wet samples.
Paper: HPJ1124 Laser Copy.
Posted Image

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Type:
  • Iron-gall fountain pen ink.
Daily writer?
  • Oh yes baby.
  • Will do incredibly well for those who prefer a dark blue or blue-black, and/or must use poor paper.
Other:
  • Has visual weight commensurate with dark tone.
  • This ink is known to be dry to the point of being 'dusty', but it performed with aplomb with all sampled pens and papers.
  • This might be a 'Must Have' for anyone who uses MB Midnight Blue (née Blue-Black) and wants to lighten up, cut loose, and have some reckless fun while wearing a belt & braces.
USES:

Business:
  • A good alternative to all dark blues and blue-blacks.
  • Can be used without hesitation for internal and external correspondence.
  • Posting and anything that requires tiny writing with very narrow nibs.
  • Does well on glossy stock, so can be used for marginalia.
  • Signatures.
  • Not snappy enough and too dark for mark-up, editing, revision, correction, etc.
Illustrations / Graphics:
  • Absolutely.
  • In terms of colour, it will substitute for Dark Blue.
  • Lack of feathering and the i-g tight clean lines supports its use for extremely narrow lines/labels in drawings/diagrams.
  • Due to the shading, it is not a candidate when even tone is required. e.g. Large areas to be blocked-out, though cross-hatching will compensate.
Personal:
  • Not quite.
  • This is a bit too dark and not all that convivial. However, with suitable pen & paper, the ink generates sensual shading, so it cannot be dismissed outright as a personal ink.
  • Also, with the unique look of i-g inks, (impossible to convey in a scan - I tried), it cannot be mistaken for a rollerball, gel, or some implement other than an FP.
Students:
  • A very suitable ink: easy to read, durable, good for hand-written assignments, does well on poor paper. (Pay more for ink and save on paper; or save on ink and pay more for paper.)
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE & CHARACTERISTICS:

Flow:
  • Widely considered to be dry / dusty.
  • However, no problems were encountered while preparing the Written Samples. And this Review includes pens used in my other Reviews: this is not a set of cherry-picked ultra-wet writers.
  • OK with all sampled nibs & feeds.
Nib Dry-out:
  • Just a tiny bit after about 10 minutes uncapped: the dry-out is the nib tip - not the entire nib.
Start-up:
  • Good.
Lubrication:
  • Lean, but adequate. (Similar to Herbin.)
  • A little more would be welcome on the hard textured G Lalo.
  • Typical of an i-g ink.
Nib Creep:
  • None.
Staining:
  • Not noticed in the short term.
Clogging:
  • Unlikely.
Bleed Through:
  • Not on any of the papers.
Show Through:
  • Both sides of paper may be used without a problem.
Smell:
  • Very faint.
  • Reminiscent of green (unroasted) walnut meat.
Hand oil sensitivity:
  • Not noticed.
Archival:
  • Likely.
Water Resistance: (Figure 8)
  • Excellent.
Smear Results: (Figure 8)
  • Dry within 10 seconds.
Bulletproof:
  • Not claimed.
Clean Up:
  • Quick & thorough with plain water. :-)
  • *One should cleanse pens completely, including the innards of the cap.
  • Looks boring in the wash, so bring a crossword, or do some journal jotting.
  • As with other inks, I flush and cleanse a pen after use. I-G inks are not of the sort to let dry-out in a neglected pen. However, other practitioners have reported that pens inked with i-g ink start right up after not being used for months on end. Not I; use 'em then clean 'em.
Mixing:
  • No stated prohibitions / limitations, but from personal experience do not mix with Sailor nano inks: the likelihood of a precipitate / sludge forming is very real.
  • I have used this ink to bring the ultra-wet Private Reserve 'Tanzanite' into normal wetness range. I dubbed that mix as 'Tarzanite': the mix is mostly Tanzanite but is strengthened and made less flabby by the Salix. Also a mix of MBMB I dubbed SalixX that makes Salix a bit darker and improves flow.
THE LOOK:

As mentioned above, i-g inks have a different look to them than purely dye-based inks. The i-g inks seem to reside slightly behind the plane of the writing surface; and Salix, with it's light-dark shading, almost seems to make 'ripples' on the page as it goes above and below the plane of the page. Very unusual.

Saturation:
  • Has good density.
  • A wet-ish writer may be used to suppress shading, without inducing feathering.
  • Saturation LINK
Shading:
  • Almost in-your-face, but not distracting.
  • Shading LINK
  • Shading LINK
  • Shading LINK
Feathering:
  • None noticed
  • N.B. As this ink is highly unlikely to feather or bleed through, a wet writer may be used.
  • Tight line Link
  • Ink pool LINK
:thumbup:
Variance depending on pen+nib combos used:
  • Maintains 'The Look' across the sampled pens & papers.
  • Even with the narrow nibs, the shading is visible. Carumba!
FIDELITY:

Is colour name appropriate / accurate?
  • No idea.
  • Name is unlikely to be a by-product of Happy Hour libations.
PAPERS:

Lovely papers:
  • This ink should look good on all white papers.
  • Could overcome paper with optical brighteners.
Trip-wire papers:
  • Can't think of one.
Tinted Papers:
  • The shading generated could provide the opportunity to generate a two-colour impression: Salix where saturation is high; and a mix of Salix and the tint of the paper where ink saturation is low. I think the G Lalo Ivory is too yellow/warm for this, but perhaps a buff or pale brown paper for an 'antique' look.
Is high-end paper 'worth it'?
  • Very much a Dealer's Choice:
  • Salix is going to do what it does pretty much without regard for the paper. However, good paper does allow Salix to do its thing more easily and consistently.
  • Also, due to the lean lubrication, a very smooth paper may be preferred by some practitioners.
OTHER THAN INK:

Presentation :
  • 50 ml. bottle.
Country of origin:
  • Germany.
Container:
  • A very simple cylindrical brown-tinted glass bottle, 40 mm diameter and 78 mm tall.
  • The centred round opening is an adequate 22 mm.
  • The text on the label is in four European languages.
  • The hard white plastic screw cap has adequate grippy nodes, and is easy to grasp. Note: I heard the plastic lid was replaced by a metal cap.
  • The cap is not child-proof.
  • The cap seal is 'foam' plastic.
  • Single tank, no filling aids, no sediment collector. Another Tsk!
  • The label obscures the ink level / surface. No fun for snorkel fillers.
Box:
  • Pleasantly absent.
Eco-Green:
  • Bonus Points for not using a box
Availability:
  • Various on-line outlets
ETC:

Majik:
  • The high degree of shading, and tight lines provides the basis for conjuring.
Personal Pen & Paper Pick:
  • Tough one, so I'll pick two: the C74 + SFM nib on the HPJ1124; and the Notorious Pink Safari + B nib in a body stocking on the Triomphe.
  • Runner-up: Skyline + F nib on the Lalo: an unexpected and impressive performance of a narrow nib on a hard textured paper.
Yickity Yackity:
  • A tour-de-force from an ink that I've used mostly for special purposes, and not so often for general writing.
  • Was this an 'ugly ducking' / black swan ink?
  • This is definitely moving forward on the ink shelf.
  • Ah kushbaby, not your colour, but you can make the stretch ...
I=+o+=I=+-+=I=+o+=I=+-+=I=+O+=I=+-+=I=+o+=I=+-+=I=+o+=I

MATERIEL USED:

These pen+nib combos:

For Written Samples:
A. Esterbrook J + 9550 steel Posting XF.
B. *Eversharp Skyline + 14K firm F.
C. Pilot Custom 74 + SFM
D.Waterman Carene + 18K M
E. The Notorious Pink Safari + steel B nib + body stocking.
F. Sailor Demonstrator + 14K MS nib.

For lines & labels:
  • Pilot Plumix + steel XF nib; inked with Visconti Bordeaux.
On these papers:
  • HPJ1124 24 lb. Laser Copy.
  • Clairefontaine Triomphe.
  • G Lalo 'Verge de France', White
  • Pulp - One-a-day cartoon calendar page: Esterbrook J + XF.
  • Glossy card stock: Sailor + MS.
NOTES:

To be relevant to the most members, I make an effort to use papers, pens & nibs that are readily available, for which I paid $100 or less, and are 'factory stock' - not customised.
If I use something outside of my guidelines, it will be ID-ed with an asterix to denote a *Dealer's Choice.

Scans were made on an Epson V600 scanner; factory defaults were accepted.
Figures shown were scanned at 150 dpi & 24 bit colour.
Images linked were scanned at 300 dpi & 24 bit colour.
Scans were not adjusted other than cropping and straightening using iPhoto on a MacBook, but most went straight to the file sharing thingy.

Scanner Densitometer Readings were generated from the 'N' in 'Ink Review' in Figure 2: Red 33; Green 134; Blue 210; Luminosity 129.

-30-


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


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#2 Sandy1

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 21:56

Hi All,

As I wasn't too very sure about the changes that this i-g ink makes in the near-term, I left the Written Samples to age-out / cure before posting.

Hope it was worth the wait.

Scabiosa is coming soon.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#3 bluemagister

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 22:13

We love you, Sandy1!

Thank you for the excellent review! I don't have any iron gall inks...but I might try this one because of your review! :D

#4 geoduc

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 22:53

Another nice review, S1. This is an ink that has been on my radar for a while, and you've probably helped push it up the list a bit.

I've wondered about the origin of the name for this ink. 'Salix' is the scientific name for the willow genus, so it's hard to make a connection to a dark blue. Maybe the name is a nod to the Blue Willow ceramics? They have a similar color. Who knows...

#5 Sandy1

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 01:00

We love you, Sandy1!

Thank you for the excellent review! I don't have any iron gall inks...but I might try this one because of your review! :D

Hi,
:embarrassed_smile:
Thanks for the encouragement.

One thing that kept this ink from being used much more often is that it had to 'compete' with the Montblanc BlBk, which just kicks all comers to the curb. Silly blonde me.

This one certain stands on its own, and doesn't live in the shadow of another great ink.

Well worth it.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#6 Sandy1

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 01:12

Another nice review, S1. This is an ink that has been on my radar for a while, and you've probably helped push it up the list a bit.

I've wondered about the origin of the name for this ink. 'Salix' is the scientific name for the willow genus, so it's hard to make a connection to a dark blue. Maybe the name is a nod to the Blue Willow ceramics? They have a similar color. Who knows...

Hi,
Glad you like the Review. Just doing the Review moved the ink to the front line of my ink shelf.

I did the usual Google on Salix, with hits similar to your info. I also asked a lapsed Jesuit who seems to have good Latin, if their was an alt meaning, but that drew a blank. Being a German Co., I don't think R&K goes out of their way to identify with other Co. products - they're not even self-referential.
(Now this is an instance where one of those cute Herbin box drawings would be handy. Visual aids please!)

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#7 Silvermink

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 03:43

I quite like Salix. I was using it in my M1050 (which is a real gusher) until recently.
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#8 Sandy1

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:02

I quite like Salix. I was using it in my M1050 (which is a real gusher) until recently.

In such a wet writer, were you able to keep the shading? or was the line just saturated?

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#9 delphi303

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 20:43

Hi Sandy1,

Thanks for (yet another and I can't get enough) excellent, comprehensive review!

I love everything (color, shading, drying time, water resistance, feather resistance, bad paper resistance, price) about Lamy Blue-Black and Pelikan Blue-Black inks (both from a bottle) in my Pelikanos and Parker Vectors, so I may just have to give the R&K Salix a go.

I have used R&K Scabiosa once in a Pelikano, and have no objections (seems to be a dryish, iron gall version of Herbin Poussière de Lune). No objections, but there is no conviviality. I'm sure I will use it again on an occasion where dusty, faded vintage purple is preferred to blue-black, but I find myself liking the classic blue-blacks much more.

Thanks again & kind regards...

Edited by delphi303, 05 August 2010 - 22:04.


#10 Sandy1

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 15:33

Hi Sandy1,

Thanks for (yet another and I can't get enough) excellent, comprehensive review!

I love everything (color, shading, drying time, water resistance, feather resistance, bad paper resistance, price) about Lamy Blue-Black and Pelikan Blue-Black inks (both from a bottle) in my Pelikanos and Parker Vectors, so I may just have to give the R&K Salix a go.

I have used R&K Scabiosa once in a Pelikano, and have no objections (seems to be a dryish, iron gall version of Herbin Poussière de Lune). No objections, but there is no conviviality. I'm sure I will use it again on an occasion where dusty, faded vintage purple is preferred to blue-black, but I find myself liking the classic blue-blacks much more.

Thanks again & kind regards...

Hi,

You're welcome; glad you like the review.

If you like the Lamy Bl-Bk, then I really do suggest getting a jar of the Salix to compliment the Lamy.

And the Pelikan Bl-Bk is too often overlooked for its impressive writing, appearance and water-resistant properties. I use it when I want a BlBk that is more wet than the MBMB. (And the Pilot Blue gets my nod for the medium Blue when water resistance is a must.)

Ah - Scabiosa. I also did an IR of that ink. A swab comparison of Scabiosa to PdL was also included in the Thread. INK_LINK
... And I think with Scabiosa, because it is elusive / shy, I think it is well worth inking-up an off-duty pen with that ink and using it for a few weeks in order to get to know it better; and how & when you'd use it on purpose - 'this is the perfect ink for ???"

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#11 Sandy1

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:26

Hi,

To support ad hoc comparison of inks of similar colour, I have revisited Salix to add more samples. These samples use much the same layout, papers, pens and imaging method as the current reviews.

As always, should one feel that a separate Post or Topic is required to depict a certain aspect of an ink, your PM will be welcomed. While new scans can be accommodated in due course, creation of even more new written material is unlikely.

-=-


Smear/Dry Times & Wet Tests ☂
Posted Image

Written Samples - Moby Dick
Ruling: 8mm.

Paper: HPJ1124.
Posted Image

Paper: Rhodia.
Posted Image

Paper: Staples 20lb.
Posted Image

HiRes Scans:

440 on HPJ1124
Posted Image

PPP on Rhodia:
Posted Image

Comments:
  • Results are consistent with prior samples.
  • The sample on Staples 20lb. is new. There is no feathering, or bleed- show-through with that paper. :thumbup:

= = = =

NUTS & BOLTS

Pens:
  • Sheaffer 440 + steel F nib.
  • Platinum President Purist + 22K B nib.
  • Waterman Carene + 18K factory stock Stub.

Paper:
  • HPJ1124 24lb. Laser Copy
  • Rhodia
  • Staples 20.lb multi-use

Imaging:
  • Scans were made on an Epson V600 scanner; factory defaults were accepted.
  • Figures shown were scanned at 200 dpi & 24 bit colour.
  • HiRes Images linked were scanned at 300 dpi & 24 bit colour.
  • Scans were not adjusted post-production, other than dumb-down by Photobouquet and IP.Board s/w.

Edited by Sandy1, 23 February 2012 - 14:19.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#12 Uncle Red

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 18:56

This and Scabiosa are my two new favorite inks. Salix is in my TWSBI B nib and it is a bit dry. Love the results though.

#13 Sandy1

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 19:59

This and Scabiosa are my two new favorite inks. Salix is in my TWSBI B nib and it is a bit dry. Love the results though.


Hi,

I think that those two inks are rather 'under the radar'. Quite subtle, and respond well to choice of pen+paper. I agree with your choice of the wide nib for Salix - so long as the shading doesn't get too out of hand.
Being so dry, the line generated by the B width may be rather more narrow than if a wetter ink were used; and the B does off-set the dry feeling to some extent.

Wheee!!

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#14 Laura N

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 20:31

I love this ink, and it's so low-maintenance. I have to admit that I don't get nearly the shading you show here. But I've been using it in a vintage Pelikan with a very wet and narrow medium nib. Salix is the wettest of my iron gall inks. I can see I should try it in broader and drier nibs as well.

Sandy1's reviews are the gold standard.

#15 Sandy1

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 11:39

I love this ink, and it's so low-maintenance. I have to admit that I don't get nearly the shading you show here. But I've been using it in a vintage Pelikan with a very wet and narrow medium nib. Salix is the wettest of my iron gall inks. I can see I should try it in broader and drier nibs as well.

Sandy1's reviews are the gold standard.

Hi,

Many thanks for the compliment! :blush:

I'm glad you find Salix low-maintenance - I find it doesn't do anything aberrant, and cleans-up nicely.

I don't know what to say about the difference in shading that we achieve. Perhaps it has to do with our individual handling of the pens - it has been remarked that I write quickly, with a very light hand. (No wonder I find using flexi nibs so contrary.)

What of some other inks that we have in common - do you think there is a consistent difference in the extent of shading we achieve?

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#16 Laura N

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 13:36

I love this ink, and it's so low-maintenance. I have to admit that I don't get nearly the shading you show here. But I've been using it in a vintage Pelikan with a very wet and narrow medium nib. Salix is the wettest of my iron gall inks. I can see I should try it in broader and drier nibs as well.

Sandy1's reviews are the gold standard.

Hi,

Many thanks for the compliment! :blush:

I'm glad you find Salix low-maintenance - I find it doesn't do anything aberrant, and cleans-up nicely.

I don't know what to say about the difference in shading that we achieve. Perhaps it has to do with our individual handling of the pens - it has been remarked that I write quickly, with a very light hand. (No wonder I find using flexi nibs so contrary.)

What of some other inks that we have in common - do you think there is a consistent difference in the extent of shading we achieve?

Bye,
S1


Yes, I generally get the same shading results as you. I think the difference is only caused by the pen I use right now for Salix. It's a gusher, and also has a fine line (for a medium nib). I think that combination just kills the shading. Well, there's a little shading, if you look very closely, but not much. I've noticed with other inks that using too wet a pen sometimes inhibits shading.

So now I have yet another reason to test this nice ink with other pens. I have full confidence based on your results that a wider or drier nib will be just the ticket.

Or, for people who don't like shading, at least they know there's a way to avoid it with Salix. :)

#17 Fabienne

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 13:40

I got Salix and put it in a MB 146 OB and went to town on Staples and on a nice slick hard paper. I like the color but was underwhelmed by the shading. You were pretty lucky to get such a great shading from your bottle. I did cut it with some water and it started to shade very well indeed, though. Good for writing in cookbooks because they are always getting liquid splashed on them. Thank you for another stunning review. I liked your review better than the ink! 



 It's for Yew!bastardchildlil.jpg

 


#18 gmax

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 21:40

A great review of one of my favourite inks   :thumbup: 

 

I've noticed that the iron gall colour shift does not appear on Smythson paper. Can anyone shed light on what properties of the paper might cause this?



#19 Sandy1

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 17:53

I got Salix and put it in a MB 146 OB and went to town on Staples and on a nice slick hard paper. I like the color but was underwhelmed by the shading. You were pretty lucky to get such a great shading from your bottle. I did cut it with some water and it started to shade very well indeed, though. Good for writing in cookbooks because they are always getting liquid splashed on them. Thank you for another stunning review. I liked your review better than the ink! 

 

Hi,

 

You're welcome!

 

It is rather surprising that you didn't get the amount of shading that is shown in the samples - usually I struggle to get the shading that other people demonstrate! (See the preceding post from Member Laura N.)

 

Yet by adding water you were able to get more shading, which leads me to believe that your pen might be a bit wet, especially as you ran samples on two papers. (?)

 

Cookbooks? You actually use cookbooks?!? That's impressive!!

 

Bye,

S1


Edited by Sandy1, 15 November 2013 - 18:40.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#20 Sandy1

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 18:11

A great review of one of my favourite inks   :thumbup:

 

I've noticed that the iron gall colour shift does not appear on Smythson paper. Can anyone shed light on what properties of the paper might cause this?

 

Hi,

 

The interaction of the IG with various papers continues to be one of those mysteries that only Ink Putti might be able to solve. Not only do we have the 'filler' of the paper, but the various ingredients such as coatings & optical brightening agents that reside close to the surface, and the mechanical treatment (polishing / calendering) of the paper.

 

This was also discussed briefly in my wee Review of Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink (ESSRI), and at length amongst Members in the many Replies.

My Review of ESSRI : http://www.fountainp...registrars-ink/

 

Bye,

S1


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.







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