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Jean Esterbrook.


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#61 bfg

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 20:21

According to Wikipedia Richard Esterbrook moved to the US in 1856 to make steel nibs not fountain pens.

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#62 esterbex

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 20:24

Right...Wikipedia.  ;)

Edit to add....But back then, nib and pen were synonymous.


God is seldom early, never late, and always on time. ~~Larry Brown

#63 ANM

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 16:49

There were no fountain pens in 1856.  At least not any that were commercially successful.  And esterbex is correct. A nib is also a pen. 


Edited by ANM, 11 April 2014 - 16:50.

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#64 spaceink

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 02:42

That's an amazing story. As a person relatively new to Esties, thanks for sharing and introducing me to it.


Edited by spaceink, 16 November 2014 - 02:42.


#65 Truffle Finder

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 07:01

I don't come onto this thread very often, but I'm pleased to see that some people are still interested in the story about Jean Easterbrook.

Welcome Spaceink!

Truffle Finder :)  :D  :excl:


Edited by Truffle Finder, 31 March 2015 - 07:02.

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#66 PenjaminFranklin

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 06:18

This entire thread fascinated me!  I am going to keep returning to it, to see what more transpires!

 

Mike



#67 Truffle Finder

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 17:34

Just recently, the builders have been working [doing restoration work to two corners of my workshop] and now that the work has been completed, my sister has taken it upon herself to 'help' with the 'sorting out' of all the things which have been stored in this room for a very long time!!!

She has done some admirable work, and one of the things which has immerged from the chaos is a small folder which Jean Easterbrook sent to me shortly after I spent a week at her home in Bronxville, New York. It was obviously written in a light hearted manner, referring to the few days that I spent with her at her home, which includes a few photographs, with captions hand written by Jean.

In the next few days, I will send the folder to my good friend Neal, [who understands how to post pictures on FPN!] so hopefully it will appear here very soon.

Truffle Finder. :)  :D


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#68 AAAndrew

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 20:19

Excellent! I just clicked on the link further up the thread by Musorah that takes you directly to a page listing the graves in the cemetery. There is a grave for a Richard Esterbrook, died at age 64 in 1846.

 

The Esterbrooks first came to the US not long after that. First Richard Esterbrook Jr. (the son) came and tried to make a go of steel pen making in New York. He eventually brought over his father (Richard Esterbrook Jr. the father, also known as the founder) who brought workmen from Birmingham skilled in the pen trade. The company was founded in 1858. After Richard Esterbrook Jr the founder died, it was run by his son, Richard Esterbrook Jr. (the son), and then after his death it was run by Richard Esterbrook Jr. (the grandson). A rather confusing family in terms of names.

 

I suspect the grave for Richard Esterbrook there in Cornwall may well be for the founder's father. Very interesting.

 

The whole early history of Esterbrook is quite fascinating and totally tied up in the very beginnings of the steel pen industry in America. They were one of the first, and eventually became the largest, producer of steel pens (what we call dip nibs today) in the US. They were a Goliath employing over 300 workers in their large factory in Camden, N.J. and selling 250+ different models of pens all over the continent when L.E. Waterman was a one-man operation in a cigar shop.

 

It's great to see the family's traditions and values lasted as long as they did. Thanks so much for sharing.


Check out my Steel Pen Blog. https://thesteelpen.com/ . 

 

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne


#69 esterbex

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 14:14

That Tardis just keeps coughing stuff up. Carry on.
God is seldom early, never late, and always on time. ~~Larry Brown

#70 noyesville

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 14:07

Gotta' start reading more of these posts!   Fascinating bit of history ("Musings" above) and interesting questions about surviving Esterbrook family members.  Wish I had more time.... 



#71 Skrip

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:01

Great story!! More of a Sheaffer guy myself, I wasn't really aware of the Esterbrook story, or even of its product line, to be frank. Having looked up some pen pics online, I'll definitely be looking to pick one up whenever I next come across a fine specimen. Thanks to Truffle Finder for the story (love your Snake pen, BTW), and to ANM for the article. I can only imagine what a great background story this thread provides for any Esterbrook collector!



#72 Truffle Finder

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 19:27

Sadly, I have some disappointing news. My photographer friend has informed me that the images of Jean and myself are so poor that it would not be doing either of us any favours posting them on this thread!!!

Sorry about that.

Truffle Finder. :)


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#73 esterbex

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 23:01

:(


God is seldom early, never late, and always on time. ~~Larry Brown

#74 Truffle Finder

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 12:22

In my workshop, I have several draw-cabinets, for storing 'donor-pens' and spare parts for the different makes of fountain pens.

I had reason to 'delve' into the Easterbrook/Stephen's pen draw over the weekend, and got inspired to sort the contents of the draw out, as it was becoming difficult to close the draw every time I had finished searching for things!

The end result was that I found over a dozen pretty coloured Esterbrook pens, which basically just needed re-sacking, and a good clean and polish. They are all done now, and are ready to go in to my stock this coming weekend.

I have 'sonic-cleaned' all the spare nib units, so I will be able to offer my customers a good selection of nib choices.

I'm a happy bunny now, and the draw now closes quite easily!

Truffle Finder. :)  :D  


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#75 JFB

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 16:08

A fascinating thread. Unfortunately the links to the Pen World are no longer active. Does anyone have an updated link to it? I'd love to read it. I have used fountain pens off and on for decades in a sort of vacuum knowing very little of the hobby and amazingly (embarrassingly) I'd never heard of Esterbrook pens 'til a few months ago.

 

I now own three and am very interested in learning all I can about them and the company. They are fantastic pens.

 

Thank you "Truffle Finder' for sharing your experiences.

 

Pax,

John



#76 Truffle Finder

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 17:36

You're welcome JFB!

I'm always amazed when I have a look on here, to see just how many people have come on here, [and presumably read it in it's entirety].

Over 16,000 views since I first wrote about Jean Easterbrook, and it looks as though there will still be some new-comers who might like to go through it and even post their thoughts on it!

Thank you for 'posting something on here John.

BTW, there is an Easterbrook Collectors Club [I believe] in the USA, so perhaps they might even have a web-site which might give you more information about the company, although just 'Googling' the name might well keep you busy for quite a while!!!

Truffle Finder. :)  :D


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