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Yard-O-Led


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41 replies to this topic

#1 aderoy

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 15:56

Thinking about a Retro model, have not seen any comments on one. Do not live near a B/M store so must make the purchase on the 'Net.

Edited by MYU, 18 December 2008 - 05:34.


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#2 Oxonian

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 17:03

Hi Aderoy,

I'm not good at reviews and things like that, I have the idea that what I think about something is subjective, likely to be biased or not what was really wanted but here goes:-

Overall Impression
This pen is presented in a well made and finished hardwood box in Mahogany colour and lined with bottle green velvet, it looks what it is a box for a good quality moderately expensive pen.

Outside Appearances
I have in front of me as I write a Yard-o-led Sterling Silver pen,it is decorated with repousse Art Nouveau style floral patterns, very well done, crisp and deeply indented. The pen is slim being 9mm in diameter across the barrel and the flush fitting cap. The cap is a positively located push on cap that opens and closes with a satisfying and definite click; the clip is riveted to the cap with 2 very much in the manner of the 1910-20's classics and is imprinted with the company name. Everything you see with the cap on is hallmarked. With the cap removed the black plastic section tapers slightly from 8mm-7mm over a distance of 19mm; there is an engraved silver ring at the nib end of the section.

The Nib
An ornately engraved two colour 18ct nib, in this case a medium, there is spring rather than true flex but it could not be described as a nail, it is generous with its ink but not overly wet, there is a little line variation but as an observation this will vary from hand to hand.

Filler
The converter has an international standard fitting with a steel strengthening or stiffening band where it fits into the back of the section, the transparent areas are tinted green, it seems to be a good fit and there are no leakage problems that can be seen, there are no signs of staining or corrosion evident anywhere on the pen.

In use the pen doesn't seem anything like as heavy as one would think it should being metal bodied, it actually weigh as near as makes no difference 25gr or just under an ounce. I write non-posted and in this condition the pen is effortless in use, when posted it is equally as comfortable in my hand which is at the smaller end of the male hands, (for those who still use glove sizes it is an 8).

This pen is rather too fussy in appearance for my own personal taste, a plain sterling silver body or one with fine guilloche or engine turned finish would be as far as I would go and as this one has Julia engraved in the cartouche on the cap i would think that I could say it was a ladies pen without upsetting the politically correct.

In short it is a very well made and finished pen with a good and very smooth writing nib. The pen is well balanced in the hand and effortless in use, in short a very pleasant pen.

I hope that his is something along the lines of what was wanted and that it hasn't bored anyone too much to have read it.

John

Retro Grande:
Posted Image

Viceroy Pocket, Victorian finish:
Posted Image

Viceroy Grand, Victorian finish:
Posted Image

Edited by MYU, 16 December 2008 - 17:09.


#3 aderoy

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 19:06

Yes it does help, may have to think more to the other lines from Yard-O-Led. The Retro was to be my first of the line to see how I liked them.

The ink flow was a concern for me since the main function will be for my Time/Design (agenda) binder. Visconti tends to be too wet of a line even when a fine point is used. Cross Townsend is the current rotation pen.

Thank you

#4 Oxonian

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 21:05

Hi Aderoy,

Like I said I'm not very good at reviews and there is always the what I meant to say was............. This is one of those moments.

What I meant to say was the ink flow on this Yard-o-led is no more than enough to keep up with the writing what I was trying to get across was that it wasn't an effort to keep it writing, ink flow can be different from pen to pen but this one is good.

Try one before you buy one is always the best idea.

Cheers, John

#5 PeterL

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 02:48

Hi John,

I'm absolutely in love with the Yard-o-Led "art nouveau style floral patterns", as you describe them. Your review is a nice push in the back. I'm currently just stopped by the fact that they don't have any pencil in the same "victorian" design as their fountain pens come in. I like to have a set.

Thanks for the review,


Peter.
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#6 cheshirebowman

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 22:30

As a 'Yardo' owner of some 9 years I can recommend them with confidence. I own a Viceroy Standard Fountain pen witha fine nib. with a completely plain finish. THe pen writes with a smooth, free flowing line and I would consider that it has a reasonably flexible point, almost as flexible as my 1927 Conway Stewart. You can exert varying pressure, which results in a quite expressive hand, showing quite a lot of 'character' to the writing. The fact that the pen is made of silver seems to prevent any loss of grip when my fingers are warm, which, coupled with the superb smoothness of he nib results in a pen that I consider is the best in my collection by far! (I also own a 1953 'Diplomat' pencil)
I particularly like the fact that this is one of the very few pens that are hand made and all Yard-o-led pens and pencls are covered by a lifetime warranty - an increasingly rare situation since Parker and Waterman recently dropped their lifetime warranties.
As to the ornat designs, the 'Perfecta' is available as a pencil and ballpen, the viceroy is available in the Victorian finish as a pencil, ballpen, rollerball and 'Standard' and 'Grand' fountain pens. Because they are handmade, there is limited availability - only aroun 8000 items are made each year!

Hope this helps!


#7 QM2

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 23:11


I have a Viceroy Victorian, standard size, F nib.

It is currently in storage from my last move, but here are some things I can say about it from memory:
- it is absolutely luxurious, a pleasure to own;
- the texture makes it comfortable to grip;
- its slender form makes it a great take-anywhere pen;
- I've had no flow problems while using it;
- the nib does have just a bit of spring;
- the nib runs broad, so that my fine is more like a medium.

I will retrieve my YOL soon and write a proper review!
QM2

#8 Ghost Plane

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 23:37

I have the smallest in barley and a B nib. Bought used at an incredible bargain price, so there's a little gauge in the black part that I don't notice unless I'm looking for it.. However the silver is perfect and it writes perfectly. I can't use mine posted as the cap won't stay on, but it's so pretty that I put up with it. I'm a girl with small hands and the smaller pens are just big enough. Any smaller and it would be too small for me.

If you're looking at one to use with calendars or need a truly fine, let me urge you to go down a size on the nib. My B is the most luscious, wet writing pen of all my Bs. It's amazing how much ink this little pen puts down. It's wetter than my Visconti Bs, so if you don't like wet, try one dipped before you decide.

Because of its small size, I use it for smaller jobs and journalling as I'd get hand cramps from the narrow diameter if I pushed it for more than a half hour. Not everyone writes for hours long hand, so it may not bother you.

If I suddenly won the lottery, I'd spring for a grand, so yeah, I'd definitely buy another one. Even the plainest is beautiful because of the detailed craftsmanship.

#9 twdpens

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 07:25

QUOTE(Oxonian @ Sep 2 2006, 06:03 PM) View Post
This pen is presented in a well made and finished hardwood box in Mahogany colour and lined with bottle green velvet, it looks what it is a box for a good quality moderately expensive pen.


Current boxes for the Sterling Silver range are black stained wood with blue velvet lining. Retro pens and pencils come in a smaller vinyl-covered case shaped somewhat like a chest with metal corner protectors.

Corresponding Retro and Viceroy fountain pens (Pocket, Standard and Grand) use the same nib/feed.

HTH,

Martin
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#10 Sharkle

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 15:35


I have the Retro in a ballpoint. The finish is absolutely wonderful, very smooth and a pleasure to hold. The sterling trim on my pen is beautiful and is brighter than some of my other sterling pens, and I am continually awed by the quality of this pen. I wish all my pens were this well made! Good luck to you! smile.gif



#11 adyf

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 07:51

QUOTE(cheshirebowman @ May 23 2007, 10:30 PM) View Post
As a 'Yardo' owner of some 9 years I can recommend them with confidence. I own a Viceroy Standard Fountain pen witha fine nib. with a completely plain finish. THe pen writes with a smooth, free flowing line and I would consider that it has a reasonably flexible point, almost as flexible as my 1927 Conway Stewart. You can exert varying pressure, which results in a quite expressive hand, showing quite a lot of 'character' to the writing. The fact that the pen is made of silver seems to prevent any loss of grip when my fingers are warm, which, coupled with the superb smoothness of he nib results in a pen that I consider is the best in my collection by far! (I also own a 1953 'Diplomat' pencil)
I particularly like the fact that this is one of the very few pens that are hand made and all Yard-o-led pens and pencls are covered by a lifetime warranty - an increasingly rare situation since Parker and Waterman recently dropped their lifetime warranties.
As to the ornat designs, the 'Perfecta' is available as a pencil and ballpen, the viceroy is available in the Victorian finish as a pencil, ballpen, rollerball and 'Standard' and 'Grand' fountain pens. Because they are handmade, there is limited availability - only aroun 8000 items are made each year!

Hope this helps!


Hi cheshirebowman,

Would you say that the fine nib on your pen writes like a standard medium? I am considering a standard Viceroy and i normally go for a medium nib, but i might be better with a fine if they run wide which has been suggested on this thread. Thanks in advance.



#12 cheshirebowman

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 21:59

HI!
I would certainly recommend the fine nib, as I found the flexibilty of the nib means that the line is generally wetter. I would strongly advise you try the nib first, dipped and, although it may seem common sense, try writing with whilst sitting down and in a conventional position - so often you only get to try a pen standing at the pen shop counter!
I have found that I write very differently when standing, and actually prefer the stiffer nib of either one of my Sheaffer Targas or my Pilot Vanishing point! Mind you, I seldom write more than a brief note when stood up!

I feel that the fine nib is fine in width, BUT the flex allows a variability in line width that could approach medium. I does really depend on how much pressure you usually exert when you write. A light, delicate hand will, naturally result in a fine line, the more pressure, the wider the line

Hope this helps!

Cheshire Bowman

#13 wilddogsam

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 09:35

For the sake of a cost comparison, a truly handmade pen fashioned out of solid silver with a precise, responsive nib versus a machine made, plastic bodied pen with a Morse code like nib promoted heavily and expensively as having a “soul”… now which one would I pick?

Yard-O-Led O’ Mama Mia!

Wilddogsam err... Steve
(Owner of a Yard-O-Led Corinthian fountain pen)

#14 playpen

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 11:45

I currently (notice the word currently) own two Yard-O-Led pens: a Viceroy Victorian standard and a Corinthian.

These pens are magnificent. They are totally smooth writers, perfectly balanced and real "lookers". The fact that they are made by hand and sterling silver, is just icing on the cake.

I actually agreed to the Corinthian after seeing one last spring and having the same reaction I had the the Viceroy Victorian (the first time I saw one) which was, "Wow! what a gorgeous pen!" only this time I knew it would be gorgeous and a fabulous writer.

Everyone should have a YOL! smile.gif

#15 John Cullen

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 13:15

I have a Retro and love it. I have the largest sized one. The nib is a fine but leans toward the medium. It is not overly wet. The only thing I will add to what has been said is that the nib is exceptionally smooth and tolerant of angle of attack. IMO, these are VERY nice pens. j

#16 oberon

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 17:35


I too have been looking st these fine pens. Think that at this time I lean toward the Retro in the grand size. I am in hopes that I will come across a brick and mortar shop so that I can wrap my mitts around one and get a feel for it before I purchase one. The thought of a truly hand made pen of this quality appeals to me greatly.
Oberon

#17 oberon

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 19:22

You Yard-O-Led owners , let's see some photos of your pens please.
Oberon

#18 John Cullen

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 02:43

hi here is mine Retro next to a pelikan 800 and a Carene. j

#19 oberon

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 04:32

Very nice indeed John,
Thanx much for the size compairson.
Oberon


#20 Joe Frances

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 21:36

QUOTE (John Cullen @ Dec 16 2008, 08:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a Retro and love it. I have the largest sized one. The nib is a fine but leans toward the medium. It is not overly wet. The only thing I will add to what has been said is that the nib is exceptionally smooth and tolerant of angle of attack. IMO, these are VERY nice pens. j


I think I love the look of the large Retro FP, but I am not sure. Would this make a good everyday workhorse pen? I ask this because as I have come to learn more about pens, some are more delicate than others, and are "works of art" and others do the work of writing, day in and day out. I am looking for something in between. A lovely pen to look at, but one that can go in the shirt pocket or brief case, and "do the business" for me.

Thank you,

Joe

Edited by Joe Frances, 01 March 2009 - 21:38.







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