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Stipula Modelt T (Titanio)


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27 replies to this topic

#1 alvarez57

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 04:35

INTRODUCTION
Well, I stopped by Dave's (Scriptura) to buy ink... Posted Image foolish of me to believe this was the only intent! Dave knows me already - this is the guy whom I've acquired the Montegrappas, the Van Goghs and the MB149 among others from, so after exchanging pleasantries he inmediately showed me the array of pens. First a Conklin Crescent...nah... I didn't like the color on this one; then the Van Goghs (got two) and the Operas (didn't like the balance in my rather small hand) which are about to get a facelift; then the Rembrandt... nah, not much. Not seeing me so interested, then he took out this particular black pen. What really, really caught me was the nib: this beautiful [in this case] dull metal that is strong, firm but flexed like a beauty when he wrote with it. I had a dejà vu feeling with this metal when then Dave said "TITANIUM"... but of course!!!! I am the happy owner of a Titanium bicycle!!!

PRESENTATION

Posted Image

The only Stipulas I own are the I Castoni. The case is very similar but in tomato red! I'm not too fond of the red and gold combination but this box catches my eye and not in disgust.
Different from the Castoni case, this one has a compartment where the booklet and C/C go in.

Posted Image

Posted Image

It is leatherette on the outside and the inside on beige faux suede which offers a balance from the flashing red at the same time outlining the jet black from the pen. Aesthetics is something Italians know how to do well, although at times they can be gaudy.

PEN BODY

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Although I try to stay away from black pens (have many), this pen couldn't be more appealing to me. It's like black cars, they do have an inherent elegance when in black. I also loved the torpedo shape, reminiscent of the Art Deco Shaeffer Balance. I also like the quiet statement of "white" (rhodium?) metal contrasting with black.
The pen is relatively big (150mm or 6in) but it is neither slim nor fat. The cap is fatter than the body, now this pen IS LIGHT! I cannot see myself fatigued with long hours of writing as opposed to its cousins the Castoni.

Posted Image

THE NIB SECTION


Posted Image

The thread is at the end of the section and because I do not grab my pen like a BP, it doesn't even bother me and as a matter of fact, I happen to like it. The nib section has a rubber ring that permits sealing the section tightly. The Castoni have this feature which I also like.

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THE CAP

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The clip is strong with a good tension on it; it reminds me of the Levenger Verona that has a cabochon at the tip of the clip. This one is milky and reminds me on an opal, but it is not. I love the detail of the company logo caught between the double cap rings.
Having the threads at the tip of the section makes me think if by capping the pen, it will not scratch. The inside of the cap [not shown] is the raw resin, not polished.

THE NIB

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Big, sandblasted nib. As I read in other articles about the Veintidue (22), the nib was more of a problem. You know what? I'm glad I realized this after I bought it for I would have been prejudiced. This is where the pens makes its true statement.
The ink flow is exquisite, an instant writer as the MB149, the Nakata and the Pels. Of course, I have just bought it so I do not know a few days from now, but as for now, it is juicy but not going into an extreme like my Visconti Voyager.
Somebody wrote this nib is like a paradox: firm but flexy, toothy but soft. This pen reminds me somehow of my Ti (Titanium) bike: you feel the road but absorbs well the roughness of it whilst being very, very strong [the frame]. This nib behaves just like that: strong yet flexy, toothy yet there is a smoothness in it. Not as toothy as the Aurora, not as soft as the MB149.
It does behave like the Nakata Elastic which gives you a flexion of the tines but does not give you line variation. Let's say the nib absorbs the user's pressure. Dave remarked I was putting too much pressure for the tines spread out: I told him I was trying to see how much it did spread, but they inmediately sprung back into place once I let go off the pressure. I do not think it is made to write like a vintage nor do I intend to use it as such. But it does feel very alive.

Although the nib nowhere says the tip's size, I beleive it is an "fine-medium": somewhere between a medium Japanese and a MB medium (the 149 as parameter).

CONCLUSION

I really, really do like this pen for it is so different from the feel of gold and steel as Florish well remarked. Another asset is the excellent balance of the pen, capped or uncapped for it is so light! This one I foresee as a regular in my rotations, something unfortunately the Castoni did not do -in spite of a wonderful nib, for how uncomfortable they feel in my hand.

This nib rides like my bike! Posted Image

Edited by alvarez57, 06 April 2010 - 19:38.

sonia alvarez

 

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#2 Thornton

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 05:19

I love my Model T. It too was my first foray in titanium nibs, but certainly not my last. How do you like the way it writes? Mine has been an all around champ throughout the past three months I've used it.
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#3 jetdipar

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 07:39

The Model T fountain pen, with its dynamic and simple design, is a tribute to Henry Ford and his notion that everyone should be able to afford high-quality goods. Streamlined and solid in polished black resin with a titanium nib, Features a fantastic titanium “T-flex” nib that offers great performance, lightness and superb flexibility for expressive writing. I love it.

Edited by jetdipar, 06 April 2010 - 07:40.


#4 Tora Pens

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 08:04

Thank you for a great and honest review. My only experience of titanium nibs so far is the Omas Emotica which I found to have great flex too. I might well consider the Stipula now.
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#5 Ed Ronax

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 12:28

Great review, thanks.
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#6 plistumi

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 13:42

I didn't like the color on this one; then the Van Goghs (got two) and the Operas (didn't like the balance in my rather small hand) which are about to get a facelift; ... The hand or the Opera? ;)

The pen is very beautiful. I like the design on the nib. How does it write? Can you post a writing sample?

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#7 opus7600

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 13:55

I purchased one of these, and while I like the nib quite a bit, was very disappointed in the way that the section and cap seem to screw together more tightly than the cap to the body - the effect being that I'd try to open the pen to write and end up holding an empty body in one hand and a cap still attached to the section and converter in the other.

#8 Pengrump

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 14:15

I purchased one of these, and while I like the nib quite a bit, was very disappointed in the way that the section and cap seem to screw together more tightly than the cap to the body - the effect being that I'd try to open the pen to write and end up holding an empty body in one hand and a cap still attached to the section and converter in the other.


+1 :headsmack:

#9 hari317

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 18:05

Nice review with great photographs, Thanks!
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#10 alvarez57

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 19:54

I didn't like the color on this one; then the Van Goghs (got two) and the Operas (didn't like the balance in my rather small hand) which are about to get a facelift; ... The hand or the Opera? Posted Image

The pen is very beautiful. I like the design on the nib. How does it write? Can you post a writing sample?

Posted Image

That's cute Marta: I could say the hand for it is showing "age spots" by now! I have to go back to my camera and show you how it writes. Not much spectacular if you expect line variation as with the vintage pens but it is how it feels when you write. As said before, it is so different from the steel and gold nibs: it has the firmness of the steel but the flex of the gold - as best I can describe it.

sonia alvarez

 

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#11 alvarez57

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 20:02

I purchased one of these, and while I like the nib quite a bit, was very disappointed in the way that the section and cap seem to screw together more tightly than the cap to the body - the effect being that I'd try to open the pen to write and end up holding an empty body in one hand and a cap still attached to the section and converter in the other.


+1 Posted Image


That did happened to me twice, until I found out I was tightening the cap a bit forcefully. Once I stopped from doing it, I have no problems whatsoever. IMHO, the other features of the pen override this little inconvenience.


Nice review with great photographs, Thanks!



Thanks! A point-n-shoot Canon SX100. The macro tends to distort a lot but hey! It's a do it all camera!

sonia alvarez

 

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#12 alvarez57

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 20:21

I like the design on the nib.



The Stipulas have that beautiful engraving/stamping on their nibs. They are semi-flex (as opposed to Omas and Pelikans) and they tend to be juicy - althought this is something I learned can be altered.

Posted Image

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#13 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 20:23

very nice example thanks for sharing :thumbup:
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#14 Ondina

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:42

Wonderful review of a really interesting pen, alvarez, very, very nice and well done. Many thanks.

#15 alvarez57

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 05:04

Thanks for the kind words!

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#16 cwnidog

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 22:51

I've had mine for about a year now and you're right - it's a winner.
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#17 ballboy

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 18:48

This is a very reassuring review for someone who's committed to buying one of the FPN editions :thumbup:
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#18 alvarez57

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 02:18

I purchased one of these, and while I like the nib quite a bit, was very disappointed in the way that the section and cap seem to screw together more tightly than the cap to the body - the effect being that I'd try to open the pen to write and end up holding an empty body in one hand and a cap still attached to the section and converter in the other.


+1 :headsmack:



This is a very reassuring review for someone who's committed to buying one of the FPN editions :thumbup:

:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:
Don't wanna burst your bubble but this is what happened ayear later due to the tight section and cap!

Posted Image


Posted Image
I have to take it back to Dave so he can ship it to Stipula. :ph34r:

Edited by alvarez57, 19 July 2011 - 02:19.

sonia alvarez

 

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#19 ballboy

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 13:04

Thanks Sonia.
I'll consider myself suitably warned! :embarrassed_smile: Let's see how well mine fares after a year...if the order go through!
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#20 ttakacs

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 15:33

Elsewhere on FPN I observed that I had the same problem as did Sonia with my Stipula -- fortunately, I had just purchased the pen new and was able to return it for a refund.






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