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REVIEW: Comparison of wide sections


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20 replies to this topic

#1 jar

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 20:58

One thing that gets mentioned often is that pens with a wider section are more comfortable to use over an extended period and in particular, for those that suffer from things like arthritis. Based on that idea I would like to address several pens that might fit that description.

Posted Image

Working from left to right.

The first pen is a modern OMAS Milord. The modern OMAS Paragon is even larger, but I find the smooth, highly polished all metal section is not as controllable as the resin section of the Milord. The section has a slight taper and I find it very easy to control the angle of the nib at the paper.

Next is the old style large OMAS 360. There is also a Magnum version that is even bigger but seldom seen. The unique triangular gently tapered section and slight rotation of the nib works well for many in control of nib position and I find it works very well under marathon writing sessions.

Pelikans contribution to the wide body pens is the 1000 size. The section is slightly different from the previous two, a very little more curved than the straight line taper seen the the former but the big intricate highly engraved nib can override many shortcomings.

The Old Man of the group is the Sheaffer PFM. It also has the most taper of the group. Since the PFM is long discontinued, it's good to know that the same profile is available in the Legacy and Legacy II models. The PFM is the lightest and most responsive of all of the pens, but the newer Legacy and Legacy II pens will be about the same weight as others in this review.

The large size ST Dupont Montparnasse is the odd man in the group. The section is actually inside the body and you hold the body itself to write. It is a fairly heavy pen being Chinese Lacquer over a brass body.

The last pen is the modern Montblanc 149. When folk think of wide body pens, this is the one that usually comes to mind. It has the shortest of all the sections and also the straightest with the least taper.

Which is my personal favorite?

Posted Image

I'll let you guess.


Edited by jar, 21 February 2010 - 20:21.

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#2 Pfhorrest

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 21:10

Great comparison of some common oversize pen (Haven't heard of the Dupont before now, though). I'm sure many will find this very helpful.
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#3 ruud2904

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 21:10

Very interesting to compare these wide section pens by their sections. Many thanks mfor this insight.

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#4 jar

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 21:16

Great comparison of some common oversize pen (Haven't heard of the Dupont before now, though). I'm sure many will find this very helpful.


There is a full review of the large Montparnasse here and the standard sized one here.

It's an awesome pen.

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#5 Gendo

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 21:29

A helpful post, Jar. Thank you.

I noticed I have a tendency to grip my pens by barrel, not the section, and I wonder if it's because I'm unconsciously wanting the comfort of holding something wider. (I do have long writing sessions.) Having just purchased a new Milord, I'll be eager to see if I more naturally hold it by the section.
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#6 carlc

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 21:45

Thanks jar - just what the doctor ordered (sadly the accountant doesn't agree)!

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#7 jar

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 22:07

A helpful post, Jar. Thank you.

I noticed I have a tendency to grip my pens by barrel, not the section, and I wonder if it's because I'm unconsciously wanting the comfort of holding something wider. (I do have long writing sessions.) Having just purchased a new Milord, I'll be eager to see if I more naturally hold it by the section.


Width is important but it is also just one of the factors that should be considered. Remember I am neither a chemist or materials engineer and so have no idea precisely what materials any of the pens are made from so I can only addresses personal experience.

Of the pens, the Montparnasse finish seems the most secure, warm and almost tacky in feel and so the easiest to control. I find this true even in their slimmer pens. The material OMAS uses is very close, they call it Vegetal Resin, and it too warms to the touch and gives lots of tactile feel and control.

The Pelikan and Montblanc material are different. They both seem colder, smoother harder to hold and control.

The surprise of the bunch are my PFMs. Remember they are all OLD technology and materials yet except for the natural Chinese Lacquer of the Montparnasse it is likely the easiest to use over extended periods.

The design of the section, how much or little it slopes, whether it is a straight line slope or curved, will also make a difference.

Fortunately there are lots of choices and answers out there, more than at any other period, and there is likely something that is perfect for everyone.

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#8 seasterl

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 22:40

Thanks for the comparison, Jar. These are my kind of pens. I really cannot tolerate skinny pens. Sometimes normal-sized pens still wear on my hand over extended periods. BTW, is there any other comfort issues that can be addressed among the pens you discussed, like threads or length of the nib? (Where would the Pelican M800 fit among these?)

#9 jar

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 00:05

The Pelikan 800 is considerably smaller in all ways.

The PFM and 360 are slip cap so no threads, the Montparnasse threads are in front of the pen body and so not where anyone would touch.

On the Milord, Pelikan and Montblanc it will depend on the individuals hands whether or not the threads might be uncomfortable.

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#10 dizzypen

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 15:24

Jar asked me to include a comparison picture of the Laban Mento and the Levenger Plumpster. These are two pens with thick sections but cheap price tags. The Laban Mento can be had at several online retailers and on ebay for $30-$80. The Levenger Plumpster (not Plumpster on a diet) has been discontinued, but several still pop up both in the marketplace and on Levenger's Ebay Outlet. They generally go for less than $50.

I don't own any of the pens Jar has (yet) but I've included a Pilot VP and an M205 to add perspective to the picture. HTH

Left to Right: Pilot VP, Laban Mento, Levenger Plumpster, Pelikan m205

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#11 jar

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 15:37

Jar asked me to include a comparison picture of the Laban Mento and the Levenger Plumpster. These are two pens with thick sections but cheap price tags. The Laban Mento can be had at several online retailers and on ebay for $30-$80. The Levenger Plumpster (not Plumpster on a diet) has been discontinued, but several still pop up both in the marketplace and on Levenger's Ebay Outlet. They generally go for less than $50.

I don't own any of the pens Jar has (yet) but I've included a Pilot VP and an M205 to add perspective to the picture. HTH

Left to Right: Pilot VP, Laban Mento, Levenger Plumpster, Pelikan m205



Thanks Dizzy. I have a Pilot/Namaki VP so I will redo the picture and include the VP so folk can relate your pens with the others as well.

AbE:

Posted Image

From left to right: Pilot/Namaki Vanishing Point, Pelikan 1000, Pelikan 200, Sheaffer PFM, Montblanc 149, ST Dupont large Montparnasse, OMAS 360, OMAS new style Milord.


Edited by jar, 22 February 2010 - 16:56.

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#12 Ed Ronax

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 12:35

I'm with you on the 149.
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#13 Namo

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Posted 05 September 2010 - 22:26

If I may contribute to this noble task:


[attachment=76537:Oversize2-IMG_8422.JPG]


From left to right:

Lamy 2k (for comparison's sake), then: Acura Serpent (the section is very thin); Varuna Rajan; Delta Dolce Vita Oversize (the section is almost strait and as large as the body; the section seems fater than a 149's); Danitrio Densho; Varuna Vishal (section as large as the Rajan's, the bady is fater).

See this thread for other pics and comparisons of big fat pens

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#14 ballboy

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 22:14

Posted Image

From left to right: Pilot/Namaki Vanishing Point, Pelikan 1000, Pelikan 200, Sheaffer PFM, Montblanc 149, ST Dupont large Montparnasse, OMAS 360, OMAS new style Milord.

I love your VP: far handsomer than the current line up. I love my carbonesque blue but your black with that sleek front clip looks impressive!
Roger


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#15 jar

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 22:47

I love your VP: far handsomer than the current line up. I love my carbonesque blue but your black with that sleek front clip looks impressive!


It's one of the older ones. I have three of them I think.

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#16 pkoko

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 16:34

Wider and lighter pens are the key to long term writing comfort at least for me. But I do suffer from arthritis.
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#17 Silvermink

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 17:52

The Delta Dolcevita Oversize is definitely a beast section-wise - I haven't held anything wider.
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#18 MuddyWaters

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 18:51

Would I be excused if I bumped this?

 

This is a really good thread with lots of examples. I was wondering whether people had come across more intermediate pens in terms of price range that have a nice, wide section or a comfortably triangular one like the Omas 360 and not as thin as the Lamy Safari series.

 

A lot of makers like Platinum and Sailor will make wider pens but only their expensive models have this feature.

 

Recently I got a Ranga Model 3 but the section was ground too narrow and I am hoping for a commercial pen that I could try in-store before buying.


Link to a post about ergonomics I made: http://www.fountainp...with/?p=4179072


#19 rwilsonedn

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 20:55

A pen that's recently been discussed on the China section might be of interest here: the Hero 565, sometimes rather inappropriately called the Chinese PFM. It is a wide-bodied, quite light, hooded pen (not an inlaid nib) that is very inexpensive. On the plus side, most people seem to find them comfortable and wonderful writers. On the minus side, they are inexpensive Chinese pens: most have a typical Chinese squeeze filler, and the quality can vary. But for a few dollars, they are definitely worth trying.

ron



#20 MuddyWaters

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 13:27

A pen that's recently been discussed on the China section might be of interest here: the Hero 565, sometimes rather inappropriately called the Chinese PFM. It is a wide-bodied, quite light, hooded pen (not an inlaid nib) that is very inexpensive. On the plus side, most people seem to find them comfortable and wonderful writers. On the minus side, they are inexpensive Chinese pens: most have a typical Chinese squeeze filler, and the quality can vary. But for a few dollars, they are definitely worth trying.

ron

 

Pulled the trigger on a Hero 565 and Jinhao 159 yesterday. Thanks for the suggestion! Is the Hero 565 wider than the 616?


Link to a post about ergonomics I made: http://www.fountainp...with/?p=4179072







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