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Custom Heritage 91


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12 replies to this topic

#1 holgalee

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 07:12

Hi all, I'm wondering about the colours of the pen as posted here: http://www.pilot.co....ge91/index.html

Is the red pen a bright red or more burgundy/purple in color? What about the blue? Is it blue or teal (greenish blue)? At first glance, would you say it's a blue or green pen?

I'm keen on a fine nib that is a little soft or has a bit of flex. I've tried the Custom 74's F and it's very stiff. Should I go for the soft fine or soft fine medium? I like the line widths of the Prera and the Vanishing Point's F nibs, and the slight flex of the latter. From the Google translation of the Pilot nibs page, the SFM seems to write both finer and with more line variation. But if it's more flexible than the soft fine, does this mean I have to slow down when I write?

Edited by holgalee, 06 February 2010 - 09:59.


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#2 AltecGreen

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 07:33

Hi Holgalee,


You are going to run into a rather irritating problem.


The Custom Heritage 91 nib selection is a bit odd. You can get the following nibs EF・F・SF・FM・SFM・M・SM・B・BB on the black pen. However, the nib choice for the three colored pens is limited to F・FM・M・B. You can find this information on Pilot's page in fine print in the nibs section for the Custom Heritage 91. I double checked with Ujuku shop and their page shows the same nib selection.

Edited by AltecGreen, 06 February 2010 - 07:34.

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#3 holgalee

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 09:55

Hmmm....this is annoying indeed! Thanks for letting me know.

Ok, so I might have to get the black pen. Has enyone tried the SF or SFM nibs?

#4 bensuzuki

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 12:20

Prera F is finer than 91 F. so I think SF is better than SFM for you.

#5 holgalee

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 14:26

Yes I thought so too. But the line widths chart shows the SFM as writing finer and with more line variation than the SF. :headsmack: I'm confused!

#6 Robert Alan

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 01:37

Yes I thought so too. But the line widths chart shows the SFM as writing finer and with more line variation than the SF. Posted Image I'm confused!


Hello! I own a Custom 74 in black with the SFM nib and it writes with a beautiful, slight flexibility. I also have Custom 74s with fine (dark red pen & GFT) and soft-medium (black pen & GFT). The SFM nib has more personality, I think, thank the SM nib. Also, although its line is a bit wider than the standard Pilot/Japanese fine width, it produces a beautiful, modulated line that you might enjoy.

For some reason Pilot offers a wide range of nib sizes for the black models, but it is not difficult to remove a nib and switch it to another pen, as long as it's the same size nib (size 5 in the Custom 91 and Custom 74--although the 91 nib is rhodium plated). The nib is force-fit into an inner section sleeve that is threaded and screwed into the main section. It is possible to unscrew the entire "unit" (nib/feed and inner section). Please note that it is "reverse-threaded." When removing the nib/feed, put your non-dominant hand's thumb on the top of the nib and the forefinger under the feed (like removing a pelikan Souveran nib/feed unit), and use your dominant hand to turn the barrel. If there is a problem unscrewing the nib unit, it is also possible to remove the nib and feed together in the same manner that Sailor Profit 1911/Professional gear nibs are pulled out with the feed. Simply, twist the nib and feed counter-clockwise while gently pulling out. Like the Sailor nibs, the Pilot nib and feed unit has a "registration" point (on top of the feed) that makes it easy to line up the feed and nib. Of course, one should be careful not to stress and bend the nib tines.

Personally, I just use the black pens with the other nibs and haven't bothered to change nibs. But that's the way a different nib can be used in a colorful pen.

I own a Tsuki-yo (moonlit night: greenish deep blue/blue-black) Heritage Custom 91 with a broad nib and it writes very well--like a Euro medium. The other Custom 91 pens in the Heritage series are the colors of Yama-budo (bordeaux/wild grape dark red), and Yama-guri (dark brown/wild chestnut brown). BTW, "tsuki" means moon, and "yama" means mountain in Nihongo (Japanese), and the names of the colors are idiomatic expressions understood in the context of the "colors of nature" of the Pilot Iroshizuku inks. The "non-color" in the Heritage series, of course, is black with CPT.

I love my Pilot pens with 14K nibs. They are great pens for the money and have written well right out of the box. I can't say that about my Montblancs!

BTW, the Platinum 3776 is a nice alternative to the Custom 74, and its nib is about a Pilot size 10. If a person shops around the Japanese outlets on eBay, or isellpens.com, it can be found for $100 or less. I must say, however, in defense of my Custom 74 pens, one of the bigger advantages with the Pilot pens is that, most of them, take the excellent CON-70 vacuum-filler converter which is efficient and holds more ink that some dedicated piston-filled pens. Note that the CON-70 requires several "pumps" to fill properly, but it's way better than using a CON-20 or CON-50.

Cheers,
Robert

Edited by Robert Alan, 08 February 2010 - 01:47.

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#7 holgalee

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 13:10

Hi Robert Alan,

Thank you for sharing so much of your Pilot pen wisdom with me! I'm going to bookmark your reply in case I need to refer to it in the future.

I've just ordered a Yama Budo with SF nib; the seller said it's possible and I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I still can't figure out why the SFM writes with greater line variation--in the Pilot scan--than the SF, but decided to give the SF a try. I wonder if the plastic of the Custom Heritage 91 series is similar to that of the Prera? If so, I should like my pen a lot! I do like the CON-70 very much due to its ink capacity. :bunny01:

#8 bensuzuki

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 15:28

In Japan retailers do not change nibs of Pilot pens as the warranty becomes void.
I have Yamabudo F and Yamaguri MF. Good luck with your purchase.
I should try swapping the nib someday following Robert's instruction, but I am afraid I end up with so many black pens which I have to resell.

#9 Robert Alan

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 01:13

In Japan retailers do not change nibs of Pilot pens as the warranty becomes void.
...I am afraid I end up with so many black pens which I have to resell.



LOL! Thanks, I needed that! I already have that problem. I'm laughing so hard, I can barely type.

Robert
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#10 Robert Alan

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 01:47

Thank you for sharing so much of your Pilot pen wisdom with me! I wonder if the plastic of the Custom Heritage 91 series is similar to that of the Prera? If so, I should like my pen a lot! I do like the CON-70 very much due to its ink capacity. Posted Image


You are very welcome. 'Not sure I'd call it wisdom, though. LOL

I think the Custom 91 plastic is thicker and, of course, heavier than the Prera. The Prera is a pretty basic pen although it is well-made. It is, indeed, pretty. I have two, and they do the job. (I use my pens for journaling and drawing.)

Yes, the capacity of the CON-70 is excellent, considering it's a converter. The cool, Japanese magazine (actually a "mook"=magazine/book), Shumi-no Bungu Bako, did a comparison of converters and popular, current fountain pens, including dedicated piston-fillers. The CON-70 holds 1.10cc of ink and a CON-50 holds 0.81cc. According to the magazine, which I believe is trustworthy, a Pilot Custom 823 holds 1.59cc of ink (it's a big vacuum-filler), and a Montblanc 146 holds 1.37cc. Surprisingly, the 146 holds more ink than a Diplomat 149 which holds 1.32cc. Everybody seems to think a Pelikan M1000 holds a lot, but the article states that it holds only 1.20cc and an M400 actually holds 1.35cc!

The real surprises are in the form of cartridges like the Waterman which holds 1.30cc and an Aurora (Parker-style) cartridge holds 1.20cc. A typical Euro-style converter like a Montblanc holds 0.85cc of ink and the short, Euro/Montblanc cartridge holds the same amount! The Pilot (Pi-roh-toh) cartridge holds 0.89cc, Sailor (Say-rah) cartridge holds 0.84 and a Platinum (Pu-rah-tih-numu) holds 1.14cc of ink. BTW, the pronunciations are the Roman equivalent of Japanese Katakana and Hiragana, and I mean no disrespect. I lived in Japan, love the people, the country, the language, and the general passion for details and high-quality. Kung-fu (yes, I know, not Nihongo.)

Regarding ink capacity, I, actually, don't mind refilling. It's a meditative procedure, and I can daydream about the perfect, old-fashioned stationery store, run by Ozzie & Harriet, or Yoshi & Yumiko (whoever they are, they are "pensei," pen-sensei, more serene and knowledgeable than nibmeisters, but humble). The little shop is jam-packed with every imaginable writing instrument, stationery artifact and pen emphemera (no, you won't need imodium) from everywhere in the world. A stationery aleph. I almost found a place like that in Tohoku, Japan (I should have bought all the Myu mannen histsu). Anyway, I just like the vacuum-action of the CON-70.

Sayonara,
Dozo yoroshiku,
Robert
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#11 ekatsanos

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 18:48

Hi Robert,
Can you please inform me if I can change Pilot Custom 91 '5' nibs with Custom 912 '10' nibs?
I have purchased a Pilot 912 bold expecting a slimer line. Since I cannot find replacement nibs I thought to purchase a Pilot 91 nib sf to place on the 912. Any thoughts?
Thanks
Efthimis

Hello! I own a Custom 74 in black with the SFM nib and it writes with a beautiful, slight flexibility. I also have Custom 74s with fine (dark red pen & GFT) and soft-medium (black pen & GFT). The SFM nib has more personality, I think, thank the SM nib. Also, although its line is a bit wider than the standard Pilot/Japanese fine width, it produces a beautiful, modulated line that you might enjoy.

For some reason Pilot offers a wide range of nib sizes for the black models, but it is not difficult to remove a nib and switch it to another pen, as long as it's the same size nib (size 5 in the Custom 91 and Custom 74--although the 91 nib is rhodium plated). The nib is force-fit into an inner section sleeve that is threaded and screwed into the main section. It is possible to unscrew the entire "unit" (nib/feed and inner section). Please note that it is "reverse-threaded." When removing the nib/feed, put your non-dominant hand's thumb on the top of the nib and the forefinger under the feed (like removing a pelikan Souveran nib/feed unit), and use your dominant hand to turn the barrel. If there is a problem unscrewing the nib unit, it is also possible to remove the nib and feed together in the same manner that Sailor Profit 1911/Professional gear nibs are pulled out with the feed. Simply, twist the nib and feed counter-clockwise while gently pulling out. Like the Sailor nibs, the Pilot nib and feed unit has a "registration" point (on top of the feed) that makes it easy to line up the feed and nib. Of course, one should be careful not to stress and bend the nib tines.

Personally, I just use the black pens with the other nibs and haven't bothered to change nibs. But that's the way a different nib can be used in a colorful pen.

I own a Tsuki-yo (moonlit night: greenish deep blue/blue-black) Heritage Custom 91 with a broad nib and it writes very well--like a Euro medium. The other Custom 91 pens in the Heritage series are the colors of Yama-budo (bordeaux/wild grape dark red), and Yama-guri (dark brown/wild chestnut brown). BTW, "tsuki" means moon, and "yama" means mountain in Nihongo (Japanese), and the names of the colors are idiomatic expressions understood in the context of the "colors of nature" of the Pilot Iroshizuku inks. The "non-color" in the Heritage series, of course, is black with CPT.

I love my Pilot pens with 14K nibs. They are great pens for the money and have written well right out of the box. I can't say that about my Montblancs!

BTW, the Platinum 3776 is a nice alternative to the Custom 74, and its nib is about a Pilot size 10. If a person shops around the Japanese outlets on eBay, or isellpens.com, it can be found for $100 or less. I must say, however, in defense of my Custom 74 pens, one of the bigger advantages with the Pilot pens is that, most of them, take the excellent CON-70 vacuum-filler converter which is efficient and holds more ink that some dedicated piston-filled pens. Note that the CON-70 requires several "pumps" to fill properly, but it's way better than using a CON-20 or CON-50.

Cheers,
Robert



#12 Algester

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 03:38

Hi Robert,
Can you please inform me if I can change Pilot Custom 91 '5' nibs with Custom 912 '10' nibs?
I have purchased a Pilot 912 bold expecting a slimer line. Since I cannot find replacement nibs I thought to purchase a Pilot 91 nib sf to place on the 912. Any thoughts?
Thanks
Efthimis

nae you can't the section is bigger in the 912 and the nib is bigger so can't be done

#13 Isay

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Posted 21 December 2015 - 23:30

Hello! I own a Custom 74 in black with the SFM nib and it writes with a beautiful, slight flexibility. I also have Custom 74s with fine (dark red pen & GFT) and soft-medium (black pen & GFT). The SFM nib has more personality, I think, thank the SM nib. Also, although its line is a bit wider than the standard Pilot/Japanese fine width, it produces a beautiful, modulated line that you might enjoy.

For some reason Pilot offers a wide range of nib sizes for the black models, but it is not difficult to remove a nib and switch it to another pen, as long as it's the same size nib (size 5 in the Custom 91 and Custom 74--although the 91 nib is rhodium plated). The nib is force-fit into an inner section sleeve that is threaded and screwed into the main section. It is possible to unscrew the entire "unit" (nib/feed and inner section). Please note that it is "reverse-threaded." When removing the nib/feed, put your non-dominant hand's thumb on the top of the nib and the forefinger under the feed (like removing a pelikan Souveran nib/feed unit), and use your dominant hand to turn the barrel. If there is a problem unscrewing the nib unit, it is also possible to remove the nib and feed together in the same manner that Sailor Profit 1911/Professional gear nibs are pulled out with the feed. Simply, twist the nib and feed counter-clockwise while gently pulling out. Like the Sailor nibs, the Pilot nib and feed unit has a "registration" point (on top of the feed) that makes it easy to line up the feed and nib. Of course, one should be careful not to stress and bend the nib tines.

Personally, I just use the black pens with the other nibs and haven't bothered to change nibs. But that's the way a different nib can be used in a colorful pen.

I own a Tsuki-yo (moonlit night: greenish deep blue/blue-black) Heritage Custom 91 with a broad nib and it writes very well--like a Euro medium. The other Custom 91 pens in the Heritage series are the colors of Yama-budo (bordeaux/wild grape dark red), and Yama-guri (dark brown/wild chestnut brown). BTW, "tsuki" means moon, and "yama" means mountain in Nihongo (Japanese), and the names of the colors are idiomatic expressions understood in the context of the "colors of nature" of the Pilot Iroshizuku inks. The "non-color" in the Heritage series, of course, is black with CPT.

I love my Pilot pens with 14K nibs. They are great pens for the money and have written well right out of the box. I can't say that about my Montblancs!

BTW, the Platinum 3776 is a nice alternative to the Custom 74, and its nib is about a Pilot size 10. If a person shops around the Japanese outlets on eBay, or isellpens.com, it can be found for $100 or less. I must say, however, in defense of my Custom 74 pens, one of the bigger advantages with the Pilot pens is that, most of them, take the excellent CON-70 vacuum-filler converter which is efficient and holds more ink that some dedicated piston-filled pens. Note that the CON-70 requires several "pumps" to fill properly, but it's way better than using a CON-20 or CON-50.

Cheers,
Robert


Thanks so much for this post. It'll be helpful for the time I decide to swap nibs between my CH 92 and 91.






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