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Updated Lamy Accent Review


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6 replies to this topic

#1 biffybeans

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 06:44

Read the full review with pictures here.

I first reviewed this pen back in March of 09, and having had the opportunity to use it this long, I feel the need to make a few additional comments about this really great pen.

This pen was a bit of a surprise, because it's very different in design than the Safari, Studio, and 2000. An aluminum bodied pen, it's got some weight to it, though not as heavy as the Studio. To me, it's very comfortable in the hand.

The first thing you will notice is that it's got a screw cap. The Safari, 2000 and Studio are all pull-off caps. The cap is removed with barely a third of a rotation - and though I initially wished it was secured with a few more turns, I never had a problem with the cap coming unscrewed.

The nib on the standard Accent is the same as the Safari, AL-Star and base model Studio. You would think they all write the same, though I have found that the weight of the pen affects the smoothness. Don't get me wrong - all of my Safari's are smooth writers, but the Studio and Accent seem even smoother with their weight behind it.

The cap can be posted securely on the back of the pen and it stays firmly in place with a small pair of retractable "ears." When posted, the cap does add considerable length to the body - but it's a well balanced pen with or without the cap on the back.

I found the grip on the Accent rather unusual. I initially thought that I would have to hold it in the wider silver section (it does come in other colors) as shown above which creates a rather high writing angle, but after using it for several months I found it much easier to hold it at the front black section which is comfortable and also lends itself to a more natural writing angle.

Disassembling the pen is a little unusual. You hold the silver section and as you unscrew the back half of the pen, the pen section moves forward. which you then slide out.

Be cautious when you disassemble, because the silver section is removable. (And apparently interchangeable- though I'm not sure where you can buy replacements.)

The Accent uses a cartridge/converter filling system (converter is included) but it's a different converter than what the Safari/Studio uses. This Z26 converter is screw mounted (Which I REALLY like) and it might just be me, but it seems to hold a little more ink than the Safari's Z24 converter.

One thing I discovered in the last several months of using this pen, is that it seems as though the nib section is easier to flush that the Safari or the Studio. After having tested over 100 different kinds of fountain pen inks over the last year, I sure do love a pen that's easy to flush...

All in all, I do like this pen. There is a slight learning curve with regards to it's design, but it's all good. It's a nice step up from the Safari - especially for people that want a professional looking pen that still writes as sweet as a Safari.

Several body options exist - prices below are for the standard models.

$56 at Swisher Pens

$60-$65 at Pear Tree Pens

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#2 Ed Ronax

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 13:03

Excellent review.
And how can this be, because he is the Kwisatz Haderach.


#3 dandelion

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 13:20

I really appreciate this kind of updating review - thank you!
*****the dandelion blog is right here*****
*****the dandelion flickr is right here*****

#4 beluga

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 23:48

Biffybean (Stephanie),

I always enjoy reading your reviews on writing paper and fountain pens, but it may be worth pointing out here that the Lamy Accent comes in many forms and disguises, one of which is called "Accent Brilliant", which has a 14 ct. gold nib instead of the more common steel nib.
I own this pen in the briar wood version and the nib is outstanding.

Unfortunately -like with some of my other Lamy pens - ink flow can be on the dry side (and may limit the choice of inks), but I found Lamy Customer Service always extremely helpful and they always did their best to fix any problems that I had in that respect.
One of my two Accents now writes like a dream, while the other still has a tendency to skip after a page or two of fast writing.

I like the styling of Lamy pens and their pens have a lot of potential, but ink flow problems have kept me from using my Lamys more regularly.
But overall, I do have a soft spot for Lamy; even more so as they conscientiously cater to the mid-price range with well-designed, well-built and well-priced pens.



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#5 biffybeans

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 23:53

Ink flow problems in a Lamy? Hmmmmm.... I have like 8 different Lamy's and flow is never a problem unless I neglect to prime the converter after filling. Sometimes after for writing for a long while, I do find the need to give the converter a small twist until I see ink appear at the feed section and from then on it's fine. Happens with my Sailors from time to time as well. I've never seen this as a nib of feed problem so much as a side effect of using a converter.

Biffybean (Stephanie),

I always enjoy reading your reviews on writing paper and fountain pens, but it may be worth pointing out here that the Lamy Accent comes in many forms and disguises, one of which is called "Accent Brilliant", which has a 14 ct. gold nib instead of the more common steel nib.
I own this pen in the briar wood version and the nib is outstanding.

Unfortunately -like with some of my other Lamy pens - ink flow can be on the dry side (and may limit the choice of inks), but I found Lamy Customer Service always extremely helpful and they always did their best to fix any problems that I had in that respect.
One of my two Accents now writes like a dream, while the other still has a tendency to skip after a page or two of fast writing.

I like the styling of Lamy pens and their pens have a lot of potential, but ink flow problems have kept me from using my Lamys more regularly.
But overall, I do have a soft spot for Lamy; even more so as they conscientiously cater to the mid-price range with well-designed, well-built and well-priced pens.



B



#6 dedalian

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 07:17

Biffybean (Stephanie),

I always enjoy reading your reviews on writing paper and fountain pens, but it may be worth pointing out here that the Lamy Accent comes in many forms and disguises, one of which is called "Accent Brilliant", which has a 14 ct. gold nib instead of the more common steel nib.
I own this pen in the briar wood version and the nib is outstanding.

Unfortunately -like with some of my other Lamy pens - ink flow can be on the dry side (and may limit the choice of inks), but I found Lamy Customer Service always extremely helpful and they always did their best to fix any problems that I had in that respect.
One of my two Accents now writes like a dream, while the other still has a tendency to skip after a page or two of fast writing.

I like the styling of Lamy pens and their pens have a lot of potential, but ink flow problems have kept me from using my Lamys more regularly.
But overall, I do have a soft spot for Lamy; even more so as they conscientiously cater to the mid-price range with well-designed, well-built and well-priced pens.



B


Great review. made me decide to buy one. I would like the wood version so I have a question (@ beluga) Have you used the pen for some time and if so how does the wood age?
I have had a few pens with wood body that dont age well and the wood ends up not looking like wood at all.

Edited by dedalian, 20 January 2010 - 07:27.


#7 beluga

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 14:41

Biffybean (Stephanie),

I always enjoy reading your reviews on writing paper and fountain pens, but it may be worth pointing out here that the Lamy Accent comes in many forms and disguises, one of which is called "Accent Brilliant", which has a 14 ct. gold nib instead of the more common steel nib.
I own this pen in the briar wood version and the nib is outstanding.

Unfortunately -like with some of my other Lamy pens - ink flow can be on the dry side (and may limit the choice of inks), but I found Lamy Customer Service always extremely helpful and they always did their best to fix any problems that I had in that respect.
One of my two Accents now writes like a dream, while the other still has a tendency to skip after a page or two of fast writing.

I like the styling of Lamy pens and their pens have a lot of potential, but ink flow problems have kept me from using my Lamys more regularly.
But overall, I do have a soft spot for Lamy; even more so as they conscientiously cater to the mid-price range with well-designed, well-built and well-priced pens.



B


Great review. made me decide to buy one. I would like the wood version so I have a question (@ beluga) Have you used the pen for some time and if so how does the wood age?
I have had a few pens with wood body that dont age well and the wood ends up not looking like wood at all.




You don't need to be concerned about the briar wood grip section.
Briar wood is extremely dense and durable. I recall that smoking pipe bowls are made from briar wood and last decades despite the constant touch and contact with an open flame.

I bought my first Accent with briar wood grip (and then steel nib) shortly after the model was first released.
The second one arrived when this model became available as Accent Brilliant with the 14 ct nib that I like so much.
http://www.lamy.com/eng/b2c/accent

When the Accent was launched Lamy stressed that grip sections were interchangeable and were also sold separately.
If the wooden grip should ever wear out you could therefore buy a replacement, but the briar wood grip on my pen held up remarkably well so far.



B






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