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Delta Maasai


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#1 jandrese

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 23:32

Here is my review of the Delta Maasai fountain pen with broad nib. This was something of a grail pen for me since 2004. It was one of the first, if not the first Indigenous Peoples limited editions by Delta I had seen, and it was far out of my price range. The design and colors of this pen captivated me but there was no way I could have afforded it and over time I stopped seeing it in pen stores. Produced only in 2003 I figured that all were purchased long ago. Limited edition pens have a habit of turning up in stores long after they were produced though and this was no exception. Five years after I first saw the pen I finally bought it, and for less than I would have paid originally! Including the Inuit pen I now have two of the Indigenous Peoples fountains produced in 2003 and one, the Ainu, which was made in 2005. All are cartridge/converter fillers and not the more expensive (and rarer) lever fillers. Although I’m a fan of this series, I don’t like them all, and will by only those I fancy.

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As can be seen in the accompanying photographs the cap is largely red and the body is flecked shades of brown. The alternating color bands near the end of the pen balance the overall look nicely. The metal fittings are sterling silver and the clip is in the shape of a Maasai walking stick. The acrylic the body is made from has a kaleidoscope-like patter with excellent depth. The cap is a semi-transparent red streaked with yellow and is very attractive. There is obvious attention to detail and everything about this pen speaks of quality.

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Typical of higher end Delta pens, the converter screws into the grip section and the excellent feed is made of ebonite. The 18 k gold nib is etched with a Massai tribesman seen in profile. An outstanding writer this nib lays down a sumptuous line that never starts or runs dry. While not possessing true flex, this nib has enough softness to produced variations in line weight and width in response to a little pressure. A very smooth tip provides only a little feedback but the pen is so well balanced, and the ink flow is so sure, that there are never any control issues. The section is large and comfortable to grip and the contoured barrel sites nicely in the hand. It is possible to post this pen without altering the balance much but doing so does make the pen very long.

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I’m sure that you can tell really like this pen. Indeed all my Indigenous Peoples pens are great writers as well as very attractive pens no matter how wild the color schemes appear. This will not be my last limited edition Delta!

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#2 dandelion

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 23:39

I have been somewhat sceptical to this pen, but your photos have made me look at the Maasai with new eyes. The nib is exquisite! Thanks for this review Jandrese!
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#3 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 14:32

I have tried several delta pens but their nibs were too rigid for me, plus the fact that Delta doesn't offer a lot of piston fillers is what kept me away from buying a pen of the brand. However when I discovered that my Nettuno 1911 se for the spanish market was made by Delta but its B nib was better than the Delta B nib, it made me think about the choices of nibs Delta uses for their pens.
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#4 MYU

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 21:52

Nice review, Jandrese. Excellent photos, too. I have this pen, in a Fine nib. I love it! The coloration is exquisite. The nib does have some spring to it, so "rigid" would be an adjective far from my mind.

I also appreciate your disassembling of the pen. It wasn't clear to me as to how access to the bladder could be made. Is the bladder made of a tough translucent material? I hope it's far more durable than the old ones used in vintage Parker Duofolds.

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#5 bugmd

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 21:55

What a lovely pen and great review. I have had a Pompeii and Citte Reale but it was not until I received my piston filled DV that I realized what great pens Deltas are. Thanks for the wonderful review.

don
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#6 jorgerp1

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 10:41

Nice review with a very good pics, many thanks






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