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Jinhao X750 Review


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#1 Skribb

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:24

After reading a few posts from members recommending different chinese made pens, I came across the Jinhao X750 on Ebay. Frequently when I see an item on ebay that intrigues me I will make an absurdly low first bid on the item just so that I can keep track of the item in my bidding list on the site. Well, when I ran across this matte black Jinhao pen which was being offered with free shipping, I made a bid of $4.00 on the pen. I then went about my week without another thought, until I received an email informing that I had won the pen. For free shipping from a chinese pen seller, of course the package took a while to get here (a little over a month) but hey, for a total cost of $4.00 I am happy to wait. Well it came today and the first thing I did was ink it up with PR Tanzanite. I then compared this to the same pen with PR Dakota Red and finally a quick comparison to an EF nib Safari with Noodler's BP Black, all on Staples Bagasse paper.

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Build Quality:
Surprisingly good. The pen feels very sturdy and is made of very solid materials. This ultimately makes the pen feel heavier than a plastic or resin made pen. When opening up the pen to access its converter I did notice a bit of play (wobble) between the body of the pen and the grip, however once it is reassembled the pieces fit together securely.


Nib:
The nib is a relatively large one and is 18kgp. It is very smooth, with just a tad bit more tooth than my safari but still a very smooth and pleasant writing experience. The design on the nib isn't excessively extravagant, which is how I prefer it. One complaint I have so far involves an extremely slight delay in the pen starting up if it had not been used and uncapped for more than 20 seconds.

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Finish:
This X750 came in a matte finish however there is also a shiny black finish available. I happen to prefer the matte finish primarily because the grip on the X750, whether shiny or matte, comes in a matte finish. When the entire pen is in matte then the pen looks more fluid and consistent than when the shiny finish ends suddenly and the matte finish starts. The pen has silver accents on each end of the pen as well as at the connection between the cap and body. At the connection point the silver accents have the words "Jinhao" and "X750" printed on it along with some swirly black ornamentation.

Design:
Very reminiscent of more expensive and "luxury" themed pens. Utilizes the classic cigar shaped body, the oversized nib with highly reflective accents. I generally don't prefer this design but for the price it is a minor complaint.

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Filling system:
The X750 comes with a twist converter made of translucent plastic. It works just as well as any other converter I have used.

Conclusion:
This is a really nice pen and because it can be found for less than $5.00, it might just be the single best value around.
Checklist of desired pens (in no particular order)
[__] Lamy 2000
[✔] Rotring Core (Received as a gift from Rabbidferret)
[__] Namiki Vanishing Point

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#2 withoutink

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:27

I have one as well, and I enjoy it!
Cheers-

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#3 vzilla

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 04:03

I just got the Jinhao Zhugelian commemorative 18 KGP. It writes quite nice and has a good look to it. Paid 30.00 for it and it took just over a week to get it from China. I used an ebay store called "Go To School". I also bought a Baoer 388 from them a couple of months ago for about 12.00, also a good pen. Both pens seem to be made well and look very nice, time will only tell how they hold up.
Reese....

#4 cuza

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 04:27

Is it me or does the X750 have just about the biggest nib you've ever seen?

I have 5 of these beasties; like them all, especially the classic all black X750 that I recent picked up. Very similar to the Huashilai 3000.





-- cuza

#5 Skribb

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 06:05

Is it me or does the X750 have just about the biggest nib you've ever seen?

I have 5 of these beasties; like them all, especially the classic all black X750 that I recent picked up. Very similar to the Huashilai 3000.

-- cuza


It is certainly the largest nib I have owned but from pictures I have seen I generally get the feeling that the Mont Blanc 149 and Pelikan M1000, among some others, have very large nibs around this size.
Checklist of desired pens (in no particular order)
[__] Lamy 2000
[✔] Rotring Core (Received as a gift from Rabbidferret)
[__] Namiki Vanishing Point

#6 HenryLouis

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 01:56

Pretty! I think I'll pick one up.Does it flex?
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#7 vzilla

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 02:16

Pretty! I think I'll pick one up.Does it flex?


I would say, not so much.....
Reese....

#8 Skribb

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 07:02

Pretty! I think I'll pick one up.Does it flex?


No, not very flexy at all. I would say that it has slightly more flex than my safari nib which, as you probably know, is practically none.
Checklist of desired pens (in no particular order)
[__] Lamy 2000
[✔] Rotring Core (Received as a gift from Rabbidferret)
[__] Namiki Vanishing Point

#9 vans4444

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 08:52

I have an X750 and it is a very good pen. Good weight, size and ink flow with a smooth nib. After the X750 I bought an X450 which is similar in all respects to the X750 with the exception of the ink flow. It skips a little.

#10 wing6

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 11:27

I just got the Jinhao Zhugelian commemorative 18 KGP. It writes quite nice and has a good look to it. Paid 30.00 for it and it took just over a week to get it from China. I used an ebay store called "Go To School". I also bought a Baoer 388 from them a couple of months ago for about 12.00, also a good pen. Both pens seem to be made well and look very nice, time will only tell how they hold up.


I've got a Baoer 388 for a month now. Problem with the pen is the ink flow. It dries after a few lines. Try bending the tip and widen the tines as suggested in the forum but still have the same problem. I guess this is probably one of those with defects. Otherwise, it writes smoothly. Now with the adjusted tines, it's more like a real medium nib (0.7 tp 0.8 mm).

#11 vzilla

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 03:12

I have an X750 and it is a very good pen. Good weight, size and ink flow with a smooth nib. After the X750 I bought an X450 which is similar in all respects to the X750 with the exception of the ink flow. It skips a little.


I have not had a problem with mine...... I put ink in it and use it at work almost every day. I still don't know a whole lot about this but I have read on the forum that some pens need a "higher flow ink". Maybe try some different brands of ink.

Anyway...... nice pens, Good writing.
Reese....

#12 rwilsonedn

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 05:56

I've got a Baoer 388 for a month now. Problem with the pen is the ink flow. It dries after a few lines. Try bending the tip and widen the tines as suggested in the forum but still have the same problem. I guess this is probably one of those with defects. Otherwise, it writes smoothly. Now with the adjusted tines, it's more like a real medium nib (0.7 tp 0.8 mm).

The problem is likely contamination during manufacturing rather than adjustment. Sometimes there are particles or oils in the slit, the feed, or even on the walls of the converter that can cause this problem.
You might try this: first, floss the nib with a very thin sheet of metal foil or thin, durable paper or plastic film. Writing-paper thickness is about right, business-card stock is too thick. This should remove any hard particles in the slit. Then give the pen repeated flushing (drawing liquid into and out of the converter) with mild soap solution or very mild ammonia solution. In either case follow with a thorough flushing in clear water. Let everything dry thoroughly, at least over night, and then the pen with ink again to see if that cures it.
ron

#13 vzilla

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 06:09


I've got a Baoer 388 for a month now. Problem with the pen is the ink flow. It dries after a few lines. Try bending the tip and widen the tines as suggested in the forum but still have the same problem. I guess this is probably one of those with defects. Otherwise, it writes smoothly. Now with the adjusted tines, it's more like a real medium nib (0.7 tp 0.8 mm).

The problem is likely contamination during manufacturing rather than adjustment. Sometimes there are particles or oils in the slit, the feed, or even on the walls of the converter that can cause this problem.
You might try this: first, floss the nib with a very thin sheet of metal foil or thin, durable paper or plastic film. Writing-paper thickness is about right, business-card stock is too thick. This should remove any hard particles in the slit. Then give the pen repeated flushing (drawing liquid into and out of the converter) with mild soap solution or very mild ammonia solution. In either case follow with a thorough flushing in clear water. Let everything dry thoroughly, at least over night, and then the pen with ink again to see if that cures it.
ron


This is great info..... I have another pen that I have not used due to this problem, Thanks.
Reese....

#14 Tumbleweedtoo

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Posted 21 November 2009 - 06:23

Just received my x750 today and quickly put an international ink cartridge of Chesterfield blue in the pen without good results (the same blue cartridge would not work well at all in my x450 when I tried it afterward. It was very hard to start, skipped, seemed to dry out after a sentence or two, and the pen was really clean to begin with). In the x750, the blue ink would not write at all, though I squeezed the cartridge until ink dripped from behind the tip of the nib, actually from the feed and never the tines. It is soaking in soapy water overnight now, and I guess I will try the converter next with different ink. Just wondering what inks some of you have tried in your pen that you found to offer especially good flow, no skipping or hard starting, etc.

After cleaning the pen overnight and running a razor blade between the tines and between the nib and the feed and filling with Cross blue ink using the converter, the pen writes as I would expect it to write. Very nice and wet now. :-) So, I can recommend this huge pen!

Edited by Tumbleweedtoo, 21 November 2009 - 14:52.


#15 oneill

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 08:05

I have 34 in all of Jinhao and Baoer pens and not had one problem with any of them, I thinks that they are the best made pens for the price that you pay and have just the smoooooothest nibs that you could ever wish to use, I cant put mine down I wish I could write with both hands I get so much pleasure out of them,I would advise anyone to start collecting them as I have they will be worth it in the long run.They come complete with a Convertor for easy filling. I buy mine from Gotoschool888 on ebay I have found them to be the cheapest and best to deal with. Oneill

#16 kwisatz

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 13:24

i too own two 750s and apart from the ink drying in quickly when not used for a few days they are great pens. if they sold for 30 dollars, they would still have to be recommended.
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#17 tuintu

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 10:27


I've got a Baoer 388 for a month now. Problem with the pen is the ink flow. It dries after a few lines. Try bending the tip and widen the tines as suggested in the forum but still have the same problem. I guess this is probably one of those with defects. Otherwise, it writes smoothly. Now with the adjusted tines, it's more like a real medium nib (0.7 tp 0.8 mm).

The problem is likely contamination during manufacturing rather than adjustment. Sometimes there are particles or oils in the slit, the feed, or even on the walls of the converter that can cause this problem.
You might try this: first, floss the nib with a very thin sheet of metal foil or thin, durable paper or plastic film. Writing-paper thickness is about right, business-card stock is too thick. This should remove any hard particles in the slit. Then give the pen repeated flushing (drawing liquid into and out of the converter) with mild soap solution or very mild ammonia solution. In either case follow with a thorough flushing in clear water. Let everything dry thoroughly, at least over night, and then the pen with ink again to see if that cures it.
ron



Just received my x750 today and quickly put an international ink cartridge of Chesterfield blue in the pen without good results (the same blue cartridge would not work well at all in my x450 when I tried it afterward. It was very hard to start, skipped, seemed to dry out after a sentence or two, and the pen was really clean to begin with). In the x750, the blue ink would not write at all, though I squeezed the cartridge until ink dripped from behind the tip of the nib, actually from the feed and never the tines. It is soaking in soapy water overnight now, and I guess I will try the converter next with different ink. Just wondering what inks some of you have tried in your pen that you found to offer especially good flow, no skipping or hard starting, etc.

After cleaning the pen overnight and running a razor blade between the tines and between the nib and the feed and filling with Cross blue ink using the converter, the pen writes as I would expect it to write. Very nice and wet now. :-) So, I can recommend this huge pen!


i'm happy to hear your advices.

because i've bought Jinhao X750 on eBay. yesterday i received it, and fill the ink (Pelikan 4001) after a couple sentences, it started drying, skipping and at last, not writing.
now i'll try your advices. i'll clean the slit. and clean out the cartridge, then try again. i'll write the result here.

and i've one more problem with filling ink; i have to split cartridge and nib apart, then put the cartridge in the ink, then twist. if i don't split them (if i put the nib and twist) it doesn't fill.
is that normal, or i'm doing something wrong??
PS. note that i'm inexperienced :embarrassed_smile:
Verba volant, scripta manet...

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#18 tuintu

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 08:34

well,
yesterday i cleaned my cartridge,nib and the slit. keep them under direct sunlight nearly one hour to dry. after filling, first it didn't flow very well but after a couple of try it started to write well.

now it has a normal ink flow but even so skipping sometimes.
Verba volant, scripta manet...

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#19 ximhot

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 18:24

I think the ink flow is a design problem of X750 and X450. The ink reserve can't catch up with fast writing on a M-B nib on these pens. Therefore, after a while, there will be skipping problem. Temporary solution is to turn the filler (like emptying the ink but don't overdo so that ink actually does come out from tip), then it will write well again. The permanent solution, I think is to cut a little ditch on the feeder. X500 seems to suffer less from this problem. Despite this shortcoming, Jinhao pens are great value.

#20 Chris

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 14:15

I have both a X450 and X750 and at tiimes I love them and at times I curse them when they turn skippy. I saw a reference to the channel and took a scalpel to the feed, clearing away lots of bits of debris from the 'fins' deepening and widening the channel and then cutting a groove in the back edge of the section.

So far, ink flow seems better and I have not suffered catastophic floods but oddly writing on newsprint (doing the crossword) seems to cause the nib to dry and be reluctant to start.

Chris






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