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Pelikan Griffix


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13 replies to this topic

#1 joelchan

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 12:39

got this for my son as he has proven that he likes to write with fountain pen is not just a momentary interest. Beside, I wanted hm to learn to hold a pen properly. The Griffix fits in as there is also a left hand version!
there are also finger rest so that he knows where to place his fingers. The cartoon prints on the cartridge is another attraction for kids

http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/acatalog/Griffix.html

I took this pen for a 'write' while my son is away for dinner, and was I really impressed ! the flow and smoothness in writing is not to be under estimated as a kids' pen at all! I refilled the cartridge with campo marzio turquoise ink as he likes it and it match with the pen color too.

I felt the pen is a 'M' nib and steel. it's a simple nib ; with no sophisicated markings.



The overall design is a very comtemporary design pen ; I don't mind even to use it as a daily pen on the office desk. I tried drawing, writing, all the strokes are almost too good for just kids to use for their homework

oh yes. you can also use the label included for your name on the pen !








sample writing with the pen


Edited by joelchan, 29 August 2009 - 12:48.

The BEST teacher don't give you the answers, they just point the way and you make your own choice - Will Schuester, GLEE

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#2 Pfhorrest

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 13:54

For some reason it reminds me of those in-ear temperature takers.

Looks like it's got a nice nib, though.
The sword is mightier than the pen. However, swords are now obsolete whereas pens are not.

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#3 PAKMAN

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 21:56

Uh Oh looks like someone from the Rotring Core division moved over to Pelikan!

PAKMAN
 

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#4 andy1m

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 15:21

Look like a oversize pen to me. But I like the design, probably get one for myself.

#5 jd50ae

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 17:47

A great idea from my favorite pen maker.
I will get a couple for the next aspiring writer that shows an interest in fountain pens.
Thanks for the post.

#6 Chthulhu

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 18:06

I *like* the green one: http://www.goldspot....fix/960880.html
Mike Hungerford
http://goo.gl/dUVnUZ

#7 nicholasyeo

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 07:51

It is a wonder, that you still enjoy writing with such simple pleasures
after being spoilt with the wonders of much higher quality pens....
Nevertheless, good starting early!

#8 Ed Ronax

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 11:08

Great review, thanks, thats a great looking pen for the younger set.
And how can this be, because he is the Kwisatz Haderach.


#9 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 21:33

Form follows function.
I am very glad you allowed no prejudice to over live. or Proof is in the pudding.....that's 112 or 114* proof, when alcohol soaked black gun powder burns blue, that is proof.
Dam good rum pudding I imagine.

57% to Europeans.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 30 April 2010 - 21:34.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#10 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 14:54

I *like* the green one: <a href="http://www.goldspot....ix/960880.html" target="_blank">http://www.goldspot....960880.html</a>



:crybaby:

Discontinued!

I want one. I really do.

#11 Muncle

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 03:14

I've always found "kid's" pens, once you get beyond the obvious childishness of them, to be very reliable, easy pens. Usually they're meant for children to learn how to write with, but they're also easy enough and reliable for anyone to learn how to use a fountain pen without the quirks and annoyances that FP fans accept.

#12 beluga

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 04:09

I've always found "kid's" pens, once you get beyond the obvious childishness of them, to be very reliable, easy pens. Usually they're meant for children to learn how to write with, but they're also easy enough and reliable for anyone to learn how to use a fountain pen without the quirks and annoyances that FP fans accept.



I concur.
That's also how the Lamy Safari started.

"Griffix" could be a play on the German words "Griff" (grip) and "fix" (fast).
Which would describe what the pen was designed for: to help schoolchildren easily adapt to the way of holding pens that is taught in school.

Adult users of Lamy Safaris sometimes overlook this when they comment on the molded grip section and ignore the fact that the pen was not primarily designed for adult users.

While robust, inexpensive and simple; the proportions of these pens might be a problem too. Pens that were designed for 8-year olds might be too short for adults and are often fatter than adult pens to help children (literally) come to grips with fountains pens.





B

#13 Phormula

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 06:25

Thank you for sharing the review :thumbup:

I've always found "kid's" pens, once you get beyond the obvious childishness of them, to be very reliable, easy pens. Usually they're meant for children to learn how to write with, but they're also easy enough and reliable for anyone to learn how to use a fountain pen without the quirks and annoyances that FP fans accept.


+1 Actually, since childrens do not take the same care, I have found kid's pens and school pens in general to be more tolerant of some abuse than more expensive FPs that are dedicated to "experienced" FP users.
Don't take life too seriously
Nobody makes it out alive anyway

#14 Muncle

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 09:15

Thank you for sharing the review :thumbup:

+1 Actually, since childrens do not take the same care, I have found kid's pens and school pens in general to be more tolerant of some abuse than more expensive FPs that are dedicated to "experienced" FP users.


When my grandfather had a stroke, I bought him a Pelikano Jr, bright green. It was easy to use, flowed well without any pressure (the hardest part for him) and, best of all, still worked fine after falling from a hospital bed onto the floor. On the business end. Multiple times.

Alas, he never regained the dexterity needed to write. I ended up giving it away to two kids in a coffee shop who needed a pen to do the sudoku. They thought it was neat. :roflmho:






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