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Sealing Wax Color


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24 replies to this topic

#21 MothRa

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 12:24

QUOTE (Kaycee @ Aug 30 2009, 01:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
From the NY Times 1893. Symbolism of Sealing Wax

Hope the attachment comes through.

OK... that settles it.
I'm throwing out my green and stocking up on gray.
Safer that way.

Steve ..

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#22 Octo

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 16:16

QUOTE (Ondina @ Aug 13 2009, 02:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Black edged sheets and envelopes have been the way to send condolences for centuries. Widowers/widows normally reply with a card also riveted in black. Never heard of black sealing for that purpose, though, very interesting, yatchsilverman, thanks for the information.



I have received notifications of deaths in envelopes edged in black, but not recently. The black was either written with a pen or a marker and not commercially prepared. Nowdays, e-mail seems more common. E-mail is somehow more upsetting, perhaps because the black-bordered envelope warned of bad news even before the contents were read.

The article on wax colors is very interesting. Thanks



#23 Ondina

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 10:53

QUOTE (Octo @ Aug 30 2009, 06:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Ondina @ Aug 13 2009, 02:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Black edged sheets and envelopes have been the way to send condolences for centuries. Widowers/widows normally reply with a card also riveted in black. Never heard of black sealing for that purpose, though, very interesting, yatchsilverman, thanks for the information.



I have received notifications of deaths in envelopes edged in black, but not recently. The black was either written with a pen or a marker and not commercially prepared. Nowdays, e-mail seems more common. E-mail is somehow more upsetting, perhaps because the black-bordered envelope warned of bad news even before the contents were read.

The article on wax colors is very interesting. Thanks




Not sure how I would react to a condolences by e-mail; it would be only acceptable if there is not other way to communicate. And, still...
Black edges condolences notes are the correct and most common and correct way, IMHO.

#24 Ondina

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 11:28

The NYT note does not seem much more than a copy of a provincial little town school that took the color stereotypes of the period and applied them to wax in not a very accurate manner.....

Form the desk of Mr. Roger Axel, Vice- chair of the (Wisconsin) Governor's task force on International Education and author of "Essential Do's & Taboos" and "Complete Guide to International Business and Leisure Travel" , -who cites his own work and the studies of others, such as the King of Arms of Spain and the English Royal Family -;

As there is no such thing as Heraldy in the US, the use of a Coat of Arms is a foreign custom but for the English, French and Spanish families that came to settle here. In their respective communities, families from the Old Continent have used their crests continuously since the day those seals were brought over from Europe -as well as their legal right to use them-. Far East families also brought their own variations later on...................while initials, names and symbols can be used by anyone, only those entitled to a Coat of Arms are allowed to do so and infractions may carry legal liabilities......

........lacquer and sealing wax began to be commonly used in Europe's early XVI's. The oldest known one is a German 1554 red lacquer one. Color of the wax revealed the rank of the user. Red was only used by Emperors, Kings, Royals, noblemen and their families or by certain persons that were authorized by them, as a great privilege. High level Church members & Academics used a deep burgundy, or purple. Green was used by Governors, State Offices, public servants, municipal authorities, and professional orders. Doctors used a bright red, surgeons green. Blue & white was reserved to certain religious orders, and civil brotherhoods, and commoners used yellow, caramel and brown. Black wax was reserved for condolences.
Nowadays, any color but for black, which keeps its meaning, is acceptable and conveys no special significance, although red is still preferred for business ( and mandatory in some legally binding bids), official paperwork, Civil & Church Registry, etc.



Edited to add the state's name.

Edited by Ondina, 07 September 2009 - 11:45.


#25 Rena

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 15:12

QUOTE (superbleu @ Aug 4 2009, 01:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Anyone have suggestions on best ways to melt the wax? I tried using a lighter, but that left black carbon smutz in the ink.
I also tried a candle, but this dripped it's own wax along with the sealing wax.
I'm batting 0 for 2 so far.


As with most things, you can see there are various ways to do this, and different preferences with different people. Probably the fastest and most efficient is the torch, which seems to be the favorite of many. I'm going to guess that all my hues, and others who use the spoon melting technique, prefer the "old world" feel of doing it this ancient way. I prefer matches, since this also feels "old world" to me. It does leave some carbon in the wax, but I like it better with with the carbon swirled into the color for an antiquing quality.

Chemyst suggested Atelier Gargoyle's website for tips. Here is a link to their website's tips for using matches: Matches

I hope if I use black sealing wax that people don't think death. sad.gif I like black sealing wax for the same reason I like black ink — elegance. To me it's a classic color.









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