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Reform 1745


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#1 HenryLouis

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 23:44

Hello FPN,

I would like to know what the community thinks of the Reform 1745. Is it a good way to try a pelikan filling system? I also want one so I can whip it around at school, especially during gym class. What do people think of the clip?. Would this pen be safe for BSB? It has an ebonite feed from what I know. It's about $20 shipped. Is the nib smooth? How can you take it apart?

Regards,
Henry
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#2 rwilsonedn

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 23:58

One person's opinion: the Reform 1745, like the Dollar pen, is a splendid value and a splendid pen. Both are small and light, but the examples I have both have wonderful fit and finish, function perfectly, and write just about as well as anything I have. I believe the 1745 I have was mildly tuned by a nibmeister before shipping, but nothing major. Highly recommended as a pen, but I'm not sure about physical abuse. It feels solid, but I've never tried slinging it around or beating on it. I might save that treatment for the Safari.
ron

#3 Nikhil

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 23:59

QUOTE (HenryLouis @ Jul 1 2009, 07:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hello FPN,

I would like to know what the community thinks of the Reform 1745. Is it a good way to try a pelikan filling system? I also want one so I can whip it around at school, especially during gym class. What do people think of the clip?. Would this pen be safe for BSB? It has an ebonite feed from what I know. It's about $20 shipped. Is the nib smooth? How can you take it apart?

Regards,
Henry


Henry, I have been really looking to buy this pen. where can i buy it

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#4 ZeissIkon

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:01

QUOTE (fountainpenguy @ Jul 1 2009, 07:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Henry, I have been really looking to buy this pen. where can i buy it


Try here.
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#5 HenryLouis

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:03

QUOTE (rwilsonedn @ Jul 1 2009, 07:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
One person's opinion: the Reform 1745, like the Dollar pen, is a splendid value and a splendid pen. Both are small and light, but the examples I have both have wonderful fit and finish, function perfectly, and write just about as well as anything I have. I believe the 1745 I have was mildly tuned by a nibmeister before shipping, but nothing major. Highly recommended as a pen, but I'm not sure about physical abuse. It feels solid, but I've never tried slinging it around or beating on it. I might save that treatment for the Safari.
ron


Yes, but the Dollar pen looks a bit sketchy and honestly if I got one it would be the demonstrator.
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#6 Lloyd

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:03

Summary: I have a 1745 and a Pel 200 (and a Pel 605). The smoothed Reform is just as smooth as the Pels. The ink level is visible. The nib unscrews for cleaning. It seems durable. The trim feels cheap but...so what.

It's a bargain if you don't mind a very narrow pen.
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#7 Arts11

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:06

I have one and after some use, the nib has gotten pretty smooth. I would still probably rank my Pilot 78G as being smoother, but the 1745 is still nice. As it is a piston-filler, it holds quite a bit of ink and it has certainly outlasted my converter-fillers doing similar or heavier amounts of writing. The only thing you can take apart from the pen is the screwed-in nib/feed (as far as I'm aware, you can't, or maybe shouldn't, remove the nib from the feed). As for the clip, I find it slides down well enough, but it has caught onto my shirt/pocket when I tried to take it out (then again, I usually wear t-shirts so that could be why). If you don't mind me asking, why would you need a pen for gym class? I wouldn't recommend throwing around this pen b/c I've dropped it on the ground once or twice and had the tines misaligned. Overall, it's a good pen, especially for the price, but it is also narrow so you might want to consider that.

#8 bardharlock

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:10

Lots of reviews on it, I think. I got mine from JJ Blanche when he was selling them, tuned to EF and moderate flow and it is a smooth writer. The nib unit unscrews, like a Pelikan, but the feed channels on the Pelikan M200 (this is the only Pelikan I own, so the only one to which I can compare the Reform 1745) are much better. The piston is much smoother on my M200. The M200 is a wider pen as well. The clips are fairly similar in size, shape and function. I don't go all gaga over piston-fillers, but I would say if you want to try a Pelikan piston filler, try a Pellikan piston filler.

The Reform 1745 was a school pen, so it is thinner and a bit lighter than my M200 and the M200 has an extra trim ring on the piston knob. I bought four from JJ and have 3 left, as I gifted one to a missionary who was leaving our area. For the money, I feel like they are tough to beat and also a great way to introduce people to fountain pens without breaking the bank or giving them something that would just be too nice to sit in a drawer if they didn't like FPs.

I want to get a few more, honestly, just to have around. They are what I would consider the perfect pen for knocking around gym class and public school. I'm not in that situation anymore, but I am thinking about going back to college to pick up an RN and BSN and I wouldn't be ashamed to have a Reform in my bookbag as a back-up to one of my Sailors.
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#9 ZeissIkon

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:11

QUOTE (HenryLouis @ Jul 1 2009, 08:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes, but the Dollar pen looks a bit sketchy and honestly if I got one it would be the demonstrator.


I have a Dollar 717i; I don't have a Reform 1745 (though I'd like one, I'd rather spend money on ink in the near term, and then it'll be too late and the NOS 1745s will be gone). I can tell you that the Dollar is about as durable seeming as an Esterbrook J -- it's similar weight and size, the plastic, while not celluloid, is of similar thickness and stiffness, the nib is good (and could be great with a little attention; mine was adjusted by the seller when I bought it, but hasn't been smoothed and writes very well even so). I find the ink window a little slow in clearing if I've been writing (takes the PR Ebony Blue, at least, a good while to run down enough to see where I'm at), but otherwise I'm pretty pleased with the pen for the $15 I paid. For the same money, I have no doubt I'd be pleased with a Reform 1745 (and might well have gotten one of those if I'd seen them before I ordered the Dollar). The advantage of the Dollar is that it's currently manufactured and readily available -- so if you have one, and like it, and it disappears or gets broken, you can get another without much effort or cost.
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#10 Neill78

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:32

The one thing I'd be concerned with is that the two 1745s that I have tend to spit more ink into their caps if they are jarred, compared to newer school pens like the Safari.

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#11 ismellarat

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:41

I have one and I really don't like it. The nib is smooth, but it has flow problems. It doesn't supply enough ink for the semi-flex nib and it skips a lot. At the bottom of my list as far as pens go.
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#12 Arts11

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 00:54

QUOTE (ismellarat @ Jul 1 2009, 07:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have one and I really don't like it. The nib is smooth, but it has flow problems. It doesn't supply enough ink for the semi-flex nib and it skips a lot. At the bottom of my list as far as pens go.

I'll have to agree on that. "Out of the box" it didn't flow too well and I actually shelved it for a couple weeks. It was only after I had accidentally dropped it, misaligned the tines, and then subsequently tried to fix it, did it start putting down more ink. I didn't buy my 1745 from any of the sellers here so it was likely un-tuned to begin with (not to mention having been dormant for who knows how many years), but if you do buy from one of the posters here, I assume it'll be alright.

#13 HenryLouis

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:01

QUOTE (ismellarat @ Jul 1 2009, 08:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have one and I really don't like it. The nib is smooth, but it has flow problems. It doesn't supply enough ink for the semi-flex nib and it skips a lot. At the bottom of my list as far as pens go.


Ah really? I was thinking of getting one because of it's ink capacity but it seems that it's not very good.

@ ZeissIkon: What about the dollar? Any ebay sellers of the 717i? Or the demonstrator version.

@bardharlock: I was wanting to get this for the large ink capacity.

Edited by HenryLouis, 02 July 2009 - 01:11.

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#14 bardharlock

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:15

QUOTE (HenryLouis @ Jul 1 2009, 08:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
@bardharlock: I was wanting to get this for the large ink capacity.


Ah, well, the ink capacity isn't that great, honestly.
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#15 Silvermink

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:23

I have a Reform 1745 and a Dollar 717i (red demonstrator) as well, and honestly prefer the Dollar. My Dollar has a better nib than my Reform (though I hear the Dollars sometimes come a bit dry - mine's perfect) and I also find the body more comfortable to hold and write with.

The Reform does have a little bit of play in the nib, though, which is enjoyable.

Edited by Silvermink, 02 July 2009 - 01:24.

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#16 ajcoleman

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:24

The Wality 52 is another inexpensive piston fill pen you might consider. It is a bit larger than the 1745, and I have been quite happy with it. At less than $16, it is tough to find a better value.
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#17 HenryLouis

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:25

QUOTE (bardharlock @ Jul 1 2009, 09:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (HenryLouis @ Jul 1 2009, 08:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
@bardharlock: I was wanting to get this for the large ink capacity.


Ah, well, the ink capacity isn't that great, honestly.


It isn't? Is it better than regular c/c's?

& where can I buy the dollar pens other than hisnibs, because shipping is high.

Edited by HenryLouis, 02 July 2009 - 14:15.

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#18 HenryLouis

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:28

QUOTE (ajcoleman @ Jul 1 2009, 09:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The Wality 52 is another inexpensive piston fill pen you might consider. It is a bit larger than the 1745, and I have been quite happy with it. At less than $16, it is tough to find a better value.


Wality 52 'eh? is retrodesk a good place to buy them from? Also, the 1745 is thin correct? Good because I need something like that to fit within the spiraled agenda.

Edited by HenryLouis, 02 July 2009 - 01:36.

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#19 bardharlock

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 01:51

Yes, they are thin, hence the cut in ink capacity. It does indeed hold more than most converters, but some cartridges hold as much ink.
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#20 dizzypen

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 12:01

I happen to really like my Reform 1745. I got mine from Karl Brandt. I'm not sure if he has anymore, but he tunes all his before selling them. Here is what I will say:

This are little, thin, lightweight pens. If that is what you are after then great.
The ink capacity is greater than a CC filler (probably >1ml) but nothing compared to your 2000.
The nibs have a bit of flex which can be fun, but they tend to be on the dry side. A bit of nib flossing takes care of that though.
The finished are a bit cheap, but for the price what do you expect?
The nib unscrews for easy cleaning. Always a plus!

Bottom line, these were intended as school pens not fine writing instruments. If you plan to use it at school and need something to knock around with better than average ink capacity then it will probably be a good pen for you.

Edited by dizzypen, 02 July 2009 - 12:09.

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