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Montblanc Edgar Allan Poe-review


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34 replies to this topic

#1 goodguy

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 03:59

Montblanc Writers Edition number 13 only 4 to go and got all the pens I want (until the 2009 WE will come out).
I had twice a chance to get the Poe in the past but always had other WE before it and I am so glad at last to got it. What a fabulous pen it is.
I must start with the thing that surprised me the most and that was the nib but I will talk about it later in the review



Looking at this pen is a bit of a deja vous, MB is using this 1920’s domed MB pens with many of their pens and this one is no exception. I really like these pens because they make super everyday companion but not without style and class.



I really love the dark blue body of the pen, it gives you a feeling of waves moving inside of the pen. Sometimes the pen is sparkly and sometimes dark, a nice thought was put in it. I wouldn’t mind if they would have made the body just a bit brighter so you could see in more details how beautiful the blue resin is. But the main thing about the pens design is the gold ring right under the clips ring. Oh what a beautifully design this trim has, it is beautifully decorated and I wish I could describe it but sadly my English is just not rich enough to do that but I hope the pictures will show you some of the intricate details of it.



Above the clip the cap has a rather long extension and it reminds me just a bit of the Pope Julius II cap’s top as it is also long. It looks a bit like a long hat that sits above the clip, I am not sure yet it I like it or not but it definitely gives the pen some of its character.
The piston’s end has the same motif as the caps end. It is also long and round at the bottom.



Taking the cap off you have a rather standard black section and I am so glad as I love these sections that keep your fingers nicely secured and prevent an accidental slip so it lives your mind free to concentrate more on the writing.
Well like few other WE’s like the Schiller or Agatha this pen has a rather narrow body and is light weight. It is just a bit bottom heavy but I felt it just because I was looking for it. This pen is really nicely balanced. It is a superb writer on top of being a collection piece.



Filling the pen is a very standard process like with all other WE pens (except the Kafka of course). It’s a piston filler and a very smooth if I may add even though still not as smooth as Pelikan pens. Takes a nice amount of ink and should be enough for everyday use and much more.



The nib is also very handsome. There is a raven (thought its a crow) etched on it and I would love to know from what story it came from. A really lovely even if a bit small nib.
But I almost let a shout out when the nib touched the paper. I loved how it writes and that’s not so common to say as this is a medium nib. I am a fine nib guy and I usually am not a huge fan of medium nibs. Another pen I have with a medium nib is my PFM and it also have a wonderful nib but the Poe’s nib is one level above it. Seriously the smoothness is glorious but the feedback and endless what a combination WOW!!!



I think after the Vern this is my favorite writer from the WE family.


As for Tzutzik, he was very pleased with the latest purchase. He is always at his best around pens and this one was no exception.
He totally agreed with me the nib is great.



Edited by goodguy, 21 May 2009 - 11:13.

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#2 Joehek

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 04:05

Nice review Goodguy, thank you as usual for the great photos! The nib is a raven and it is from one of Poe's famous works:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raven


#3 mmb7994

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 04:06

I believe the decoration on the nib (the raven) comes from his poem, called The Raven. Look it up on Google.

#4 Bryant

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 05:45

Excellent review as always my friend! And I must say your pictures are getting better and better...

4 to go! Whew!

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#5 asimplemaestro

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 06:44

The Raven
Edgar Allen Poe
[First published in 1845]


Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
`'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door -
Only this, and nothing more.'

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore -
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
`'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door -
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; -
This it is, and nothing more,'

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
`Sir,' said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you' - here I opened wide the door; -
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before
But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!'
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!'
Merely this and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
`Surely,' said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -
'Tis the wind and nothing more!'

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore.
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door -
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door -
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
`Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,' I said, `art sure no craven.
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore -
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning - little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door -
Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as `Nevermore.'

But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only,
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered -
Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before -
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.'
Then the bird said, `Nevermore.'

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
`Doubtless,' said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store,
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore -
Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore
Of "Never-nevermore."'

But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore -
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking `Nevermore.'

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o'er,
But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o'er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
`Wretch,' I cried, `thy God hath lent thee - by these angels he has sent thee
Respite - respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -
Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -
On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore -
Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked upstarting -
`Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted - nevermore!

#6 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 09:06

nice review smile.gif enjoy your pen
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#7 Ghost Plane

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 10:07

Tzutzik is distinctly smiling! sm_cat.gif

#8 kaisede

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 15:03

The Poe is a great pen to have but understated in collectors eyes. When I got my Poe it was at a fair price which made this pen more worth it to me. I had the pen fitted with OM from MB. It writes like a dream.

Enjoy your pen.

Andy

#9 Brian

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 17:26

Really nice review. Terrific combination of photos and description. The Poe is one of my favorite writers and like many MBs there is good attention to the little things. Enjoy your fine new pen.

#10 Titivillus

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 18:47

QUOTE
The nib is also very handsome. There is a raven (thought its a crow) etched on it and I would love to know from what story it came from.


You're kidding..right? roflmho.gif

Edited by Titivillus, 21 May 2009 - 20:23.


#11 QM2

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 18:58

Congratulations Amir! I think my favourite part about this pen is the etching on the clip-band; it is such a beautiful and intricate design

I think that the colour scheme and overall feel of the pen captured the darkness and mystery of Edgar Allan Poe's writing rather well.

#12 encremental

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 19:37

Love Poe, and love the pen, but I've always thought The Raven a piece of campy trash. If Poe had been alive in the 1980's, I'm sure he would have been collaborating with Blue Oyster Cult. 'Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary' - It's Hallmark Gothic!

John

Tzutzik is a prince among cats. He should Twitter. I'm sure we'd all follow.

#13 goodguy

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 19:46

QUOTE ((bleep) @ May 21 2009, 02:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
The nib is also very handsome. There is a raven (thought its a crow) etched on it and I would love to know from what story it came from.


You're kidding..right?

Ok let me remind you.
I was born and raised in Israel and lived there the bigger part of my life,
I learned about poets and writers like Shalom Alehem,Bialik,Tshernichovsky...etc
To learn English poem or songs one must master the language first and most Israeli can have a resonable conversation in English but nothing more then that.
Bottom line no I am not kidding I come from a different backround where things you take for granted are new to me.
Respect to all

#14 Philip1209

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 20:07

Thank you for taking the time to write this review! The pictures are also very nice. Edgar Allan Poe is one of my favorite authors, and I am glad to see that you like the pen honoring him.

(bleep): I just want to point out that, while it is relatively easy to translate prose, poetry cannot be easily be translated while maintaining its artistic integrity. That means that you have to understand English near the level of a native speaker to read and effectively comprehend poems like The Raven.

Edited by Philip1209, 21 May 2009 - 20:07.


#15 Titivillus

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 20:23

QUOTE (Philip1209 @ May 21 2009, 03:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
(bleep): I just want to point out that, while it is relatively easy to translate prose, poetry cannot be easily be translated while maintaining its artistic integrity. That means that you have to understand English near the level of a native speaker to read and effectively comprehend poems like The Raven.


Philip: I would not suppose that an understanding of poetry is necessary to know that "The Raven" is Edgar Allen Poe's most famous poem. But maybe I did suppose a cultural literacy, for that I am in error.
K

Edited by Titivillus, 21 May 2009 - 20:26.


#16 Titivillus

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 20:25

QUOTE (goodguy @ May 21 2009, 02:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE ((bleep) @ May 21 2009, 02:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
The nib is also very handsome. There is a raven (thought its a crow) etched on it and I would love to know from what story it came from.


You're kidding..right?

Ok let me remind you.
I was born and raised in Israel and lived there the bigger part of my life,
I learned about poets and writers like Shalom Alehem,Bialik,Tshernichovsky...etc
To learn English poem or songs one must master the language first and most Israeli can have a resonable conversation in English but nothing more then that.
Bottom line no I am not kidding I come from a different backround where things you take for granted are new to me.



My error in supposing that you would know of his most famous poem. But it does beg the question is do you delve into the background of the writer that each WE honors?

K

Edited by Titivillus, 21 May 2009 - 21:06.


#17 Titivillus

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 20:25

duplicate post.

Edited by Titivillus, 21 May 2009 - 20:27.


#18 Blade Runner

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 21:44

I love this one, because the pen is so distinctive even without the cap.

Cheers! thumbup.gif

#19 QM2

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 21:56

QUOTE ((bleep) @ May 21 2009, 10:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (goodguy @ May 21 2009, 02:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE ((bleep) @ May 21 2009, 02:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
The nib is also very handsome. There is a raven (thought its a crow) etched on it and I would love to know from what story it came from.


You're kidding..right?

Ok let me remind you.
I was born and raised in Israel and lived there the bigger part of my life,
I learned about poets and writers like Shalom Alehem,Bialik,Tshernichovsky...etc
...



My error in supposing that you would know of his most famous poem. But it does beg the question is do you delve into the background of the writer that each WE honors?

K


I have many foreign friends who have never heard of Poe, so Amir's statement seems completely reasonable to me from the cultural point of view. The issue of researching the writers whose WE pens one collects is another matter. To some people the writer connection is important, while others only care about the pens themselves and the writer's name is just the name of the pen for them. Just a difference in approach. Personally, I cannot rest until I discover the symbolic purpose of every single design element on my WEs -- which can turn into quite a neurotic and unfruitful activity! To each their own though.

QUOTE (encremental @ May 21 2009, 09:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Love Poe, and love the pen, but I've always thought The Raven a piece of campy trash.


I agree, but MB often infuses the WE pens with overly stereotyped symbols of the writers -- so the raven is what I would have guessed they'd put on the nib here.



Edited by QM2, 21 May 2009 - 22:00.


#20 Ghost Plane

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 23:12

I LOVED my Dad's reading of "The Raven" when I was a kid. He'd have me shrieking!






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