Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Parker Latitude Review


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Dan Carmell

Dan Carmell

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,344 posts
  • Location:Oakland, California

Posted 22 April 2006 - 23:38

The Latitude appears to be the successor model to the recently discontinued Inflection, although at a lower price point. It comes in several finishes, but I bought the simple stainless steel model for my Parker Flighter collection. This new Parker follows the general trends of the Inflection: the slanted cap ends and barrel and cap tassies, wide feathering of the arrow clip (albeit with the feathers in metal and integrated with the length of the clip), and the same general size and body shape.

Posted Image

The Latitude Flighter does not sport the cap grooves of the blue and black lacquered models. At this time, the Latitude Flighter is only offered with chrome trim, while the Inflection was only offered with gold plated trim (purists, by the way, do not deem a stainless steel model with other than gold filled or plated trim to be a true Flighter, following the model of the original Parker Flighter, the 51). But the Latitude, in spite of its lower price, does have nicer chrome tassies on cap and barrel, compared to the plastic ones on the Inflection.

When I got my Inflection I had to straighten the teardrop shaped cap tassie, which was mounted crookedly. I also had to sand the plastic mold seams on the section--they were rough and very noticeable. On the Latitude, the chrome tassies are well mounted and while there are seams on the section, they are not anywhere nearly as apparent as with the Infection.

Posted Image

On the Inflection, the "cap band" is actually part of the barrel and the cap snaps onto a plastic ridge on the section near the nib. The Latitude also appears to snap--with a crisp, audible snap--onto a similar section ring, but it has a highly polished cap lip and the chromed barrel ring is almost invisible.

Posted Image

It's the nib that are most different between these two models. The Inflection has a gold-plated nib that is semi-hooded, giving an appearance something like that of the Parker 45 nib. The Latitude's polished steel nib is an open one, rather stubby nib, similar to nibs on some of Parkers lower end pens. The feeds are molded differently as well.

Please note that this review is an excerpt from a larger article I am writing about Parker Flighter. I can't give you the most important part of this review, which would be how the Latitude writes. It arrived with a medium nib, as most lower end Parkers do, and I plan to send it to Parker for a nib swap to F or EF, so I cannot ink the pen prior to sending it back to Janesville. Oh, one other little difference: the Inflection was made in the UK and the Latitude is made in France.

Finally, if you want to see some better photos of the Latitude, including the blue and black versions, as well as a review that includes a few words on how it writes, take a look at Bill Riepl's Stylophiles review:

http://www.stylophil...11-05/11lat.htm


best regards, Dan

Sponsored Content

#2 ballboy

ballboy

    A pen-intent man shall pass

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 650 posts
  • Location:Edge of The Peak District
  • Flag:

Posted 23 April 2006 - 08:27

On the Latitude, the chrome tassies are well mounted and while there are seams on the section, they are not anywhere nearly as apparent as with the Infection.


Nice comparison there: didn't know they were re modeling it already.

Maybe here in the UK, they couldn't cure the Infection, so they gave it some Latitude ^_^

Edited by ballboy, 23 April 2006 - 08:36.

Roger


Magnanimity & Pragmatism

#3 pjturyk

pjturyk

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPip
  • 19 posts

Posted 12 March 2008 - 16:10

Thanks for the review - I thought I could chime in my 2c worth:

I bought my Latitude in Warm Grey (from Lewertowski) to match a ballpen I purchased in Cologne in Dec 06.
I thought the ballpen was a good writer (good balance, decent quality, solid mostly metal construction) and I wanted a "matching set".
To my eye, the darkish grey offsets both the black "lines of latitude" and the chrome trim - understated but somewhat classy.
The fountain pen cap and barrel are similar decent quality metal to the ballpen, but the feed holder has the feel of cheap plastic, even more so than the Sonnets.
The balance is okay, but the metal barrel slightly overpowers the plastic nib section.
Stylophile got it right regarding the stiff feel of the nib, but once it gets flowing, it's a surprisingly smooth everyday writer.
It puts down, a consistent wet line, although the M nib is slightly broader than M.
One issue is starting after sitting for even a short time, but, again, once flowing it's okay.
At 30GBP, it was not a great value, but still has the promise of a durable pen that will probably stand up to some rough handling (it already has with me!).
Peter T.
Peter T.
___________________________________
Pelikan 520N
Pelikan Niagara Falls
Pelikan M600 Old Style - Green/Black
Pelikan 400NN
Pelikan M200 Transparent Blue
Parker "51" Plum
Parker Sterling Silver Sonnet
Parker 45 Flighter
Parker Latitude - Warm Grey
Waterman Phileas
Waterman Kultur - Clear; Transparent Red

#4 dpmahon

dpmahon

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts

Posted 12 March 2008 - 16:23

QUOTE(pjturyk @ Mar 12 2008, 11:10 AM) View Post
Thanks for the review - I thought I could chime in my 2c worth:

I bought my Latitude in Warm Grey (from Lewertowski) to match a ballpen I purchased in Cologne in Dec 06.
I thought the ballpen was a good writer (good balance, decent quality, solid mostly metal construction) and I wanted a "matching set".
To my eye, the darkish grey offsets both the black "lines of latitude" and the chrome trim - understated but somewhat classy.
The fountain pen cap and barrel are similar decent quality metal to the ballpen, but the feed holder has the feel of cheap plastic, even more so than the Sonnets.
The balance is okay, but the metal barrel slightly overpowers the plastic nib section.
Stylophile got it right regarding the stiff feel of the nib, but once it gets flowing, it's a surprisingly smooth everyday writer.
It puts down, a consistent wet line, although the M nib is slightly broader than M.
One issue is starting after sitting for even a short time, but, again, once flowing it's okay.
At 30GBP, it was not a great value, but still has the promise of a durable pen that will probably stand up to some rough handling (it already has with me!).
Peter T.

Might want to seal the air hole under the clip of the cap with wax.

"If the pen is mightier than the sword I am indeed well armed!"
D.P. Mahon

#5 Ovidius

Ovidius

    Publius Ovidius Naso

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts

Posted 13 March 2008 - 12:26

I bought my Latitude about four months ago and I have not stoped using it since. It is a good everyday writer, and I love the wet nib, although the pen uses a lot of ink as a result. I find that by filling a used cartridge with bottled ink, the capacity is acceptable, but with the supplied slide converter the pen only has enough ink for a day or two's worth of frequent writing.

With the flow, I find that the line is closer to a Pelikan B than the M on my Parker Reflex. The pen only comes in an M, but other nib sizes are available separately. The only problem is that the replacement nibs cost about 50% of the pens value (for the standard stainless steel) and more for the fancier versions. I agree with what has been said about the nib drying out if the pen is left unused for a day or two, I have found this to be a standard deficiency with my other modern Parker pens (like my Parker Sonnet). The cap has air holes in it as a safety feature, I don't know if that is the only reason why the nib dries out, but it certainly does not help. Using the pen daily, the nib starts fairly consistently with little or no difficulty.

Another point about this pen is ink choice. I sometimes love heavier fountain pen inks, but they can cause skipping in this pen which seems to work better with thinner inks (such as Waterman Florida Blue, Waterman Blue/Black, J. Herbin inks). The reason why the pen skips (with heavy inks) is that the pen quickly uses the ink in the feed, but the heavier inks can stick inside the converter without dropping down. The thinner inks don't stick in the converter and flow consistently since the feed is continuously supplied with ink.

Overall, I love this pen because of its smooth wet nib, excellent build quality, and subtle elegance. I find it is a good work pen, but anyone looking for a fine nib won't be happy with it. Value wise, in comparison to another brushed stainless steel pen like the Lamy Studio, this pen is not the most expensive in its class as long as you want a medium nib.
"Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi sed saepe cadendo". --Publius Ovidius Naso






Sponsored Content




|