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Hoover 868: How does it work?


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#1 Don Jr

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 22:53

I recently acquired this Hoover fountain pen, model 868:
[attachment=48396:_1.jpg]

With a bit of heat the section unscrewed, and the plunger slid out from the barrel and into my hand. Here is an exploded view of the parts:
[attachment=48399:_3.jpg]

I'm not sure if I have all the parts, though. There isn't any filling mechanism present, and the barrel-end of the section doesn't look like it was made to accomodate a sac. There are no threads cut on the inside of the barrel other than the ones that accept the section.

Take a look at the plunger in the exploded view above - there remnants of a sac appear to be adhered to the bulbous end. If a diaphragm attaches to the plunger in some way, I'm not sure what else it would attach to.

How is this sort of pen supposed to fill? What am I missing? I appreciate any insight you might be able to provide.

Don Jr

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#2 wykpenguin

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 01:35

Maybe a vacumatic clone with the breather tube missing?

#3 markiv

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 00:01

Hey FPN,

This Hoover has one of the best aesthetics amongst the pens I own.



Now I need your help in evaluating it's functionality. The picture below shows the exploded view of the pen. I have the same question as Don, how do I restore this pen? It seems like some sort of vacumatic mechanism but in my case the plunger has no step (the same diameter along the length) unlike the picture posted by Don. It is not clearly visible in the picture but it does seem like the step may have been scrapped down by a knife. I will be really grateful if you guys can point me (and Don) in the right direction.


Edited by FPN Admin:
Sorry markIV, your images are hosted on a site infected with malware, so we had to remove them in order to prevent the FPN server and FPN members' computers from getting infected

Edited by wimg, 31 October 2010 - 01:07.
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#4 Rlowenote

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 01:13

Is the plunger hollow all the way through? If so, maybe a bulb filler. If not and the barrel is one diameter, maybe a syringe/piston filler. Seeing a breather tube in the second pen might mean a bulb filler. Just guessing from what little I've seen and/or experienced. I'm leaning towards syringe/piston type at the moment.

Ralph

#5 ZeissIkon

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 01:07

Putting together details from both sets of photos, I think it's safe to say this Hoover had a filling system similar to a Vacumatic. The big question is how the diaphragm would be attached to the plunger and barrel, since the collar found in Parker Vacs isn't present here; it looks as if the diaphragm in the Hoover would be in tension as the plunger is depressed, so the rubber acts as the spring as well as the pump (instead of the Vacumatic's diaphragm folding into itself and a separate spring retracting the plunger after each stroke). The OP's is missing its breather tube, while the diaphragm on the second posted example appears to have been removed (and the plunger modified, possibly by a well-meaning attempt to restore the pen).

The plunger could probably be stuck to the center of the diaphragm with shellac, but I'm not sure what could hold the edge to the barrel under the tension of pumping action. I'm not sure if a Parker type Vacumatic diaphragm could be made to work here; it might depend on how the rubber is to be attached to the barrel.
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#6 sirksael

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 15:00

I believe these pens may be of the twist-sac type.
You glue a hollow sac (just cut off one end to size) one side to the section, other side to the 'plunger'
Then you just twist the 'plunger', thus compressing the sac, and release to fill.
If you have Da Book by Frank Dubiel, look at page 64 for a reference.
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#7 markiv

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 23:19

Thank you all for the feedback. By minutely analyzing the replies, I have to agree with Sirksael. I do not have Da Book but quick googling has led me to believe this must be a twist filler. Now have to figure out how to attach the sac to the inside (top end) of the barrel.
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#8 ZeissIkon

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 01:27

Thank you all for the feedback. By minutely analyzing the replies, I have to agree with Sirksael. I do not have Da Book but quick googling has led me to believe this must be a twist filler. Now have to figure out how to attach the sac to the inside (top end) of the barrel.


If it's a twist filler, the sac should attach to the section like a lever- or button-filler sac; compression of the sac is accomplished by twisting the knob attached to the top rather than by squeezing the sac with a bar driven by the filling actuator. I'm surprised to see a breather tube in a twist filler, and the direction of lie of the rubber on the plunger that still has sac fragments isn't what I'd expect, either, but neither one is impossible to rationalize.

Edit to add: I'm not sure what the sense would be in making a sac reservoir pen with a clear(ish) barrel; that clear red barrel, as much as the breather tube inside, affected my opinion that it was a vacumatic-like action.

Edited by ZeissIkon, 24 November 2009 - 01:28.

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#9 sirksael

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 14:19

Good point. The breather tube might actually even damage the sac when you twist it. Perhaps more investigation is still required...
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#10 roberto v

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 17:47

In my opinion, this is a modified Vac filling system.
Check if you see the hole for the breathing tube in the feed.
In the Hoover, probably the threaded part in the back of the pen is screw in the body. If this is correct, you shoud see with a good light and a good lens the traces of the threads in the transparent part of the pen. If this is correct, you need to unscrew that part (with a tool like the vac wrench, but be careful because the threads could be metric while the vac are not). You will find a conic ring which should also come out: on that ring you should shellac the lip of the new cut to size sac. The filling is done simply pumping up and down that row.

Edited by roberto v, 30 October 2010 - 17:48.


#11 viclip

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 20:51

Another theory is that the original sac, which attached to the peg on the section, was of the "accordian" type. The plunger when pumped would simply compress the the sac along its length, which specially shaped sac would tend to rebound to its original configuration when the plunger was released thereby drawing ink up while returning the plunger.

Note also that this could be a "through sac" which is open at both ends i.e. shellacked to the section peg as well as to the end of the plunger. Sort of like one of those simple accordians used by cowboys back in the day, if you know what I mean.

It's my understanding that accordian or bellows type sacs are no longer available either with one or two open ends however, I believe that restorers will insert a spring into the sac which effectively does the same thing. Presumably the spring would be stainless steel or other springy metal resistant to the acidic environment.

I'm just conjecturing here, as I have no experience with Hoover pens let alone accordian-sacced pens.

EDIT: Take a look at page 151 of the 2nd edition of Pen Repair by Marshall & Oldfield.

Edited by viclip, 30 October 2010 - 21:17.


#12 dcwaites

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 00:16

There is a problem with Post #3.

When I view this post in Google Chrome, it complains that the hosting site of the images - imgurl.filetac.com - has malware on it.


Opening it in Safari (both on a Mac) presents no problems.

Any idea what is going on?


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#13 roberto v

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 10:40

these Hoover (or Hoower) pens are Italian made - and we have no tradition in accordian sacs. The idea was to keep things as easy as possible so I still think the sac was a plain normal one. Just my 2 cents

#14 viclip

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 11:09

It's interesting that accordian sacs are also referred to as "concertina" sacs :P






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