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Handwriting improvement


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#121 troglokev

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 08:56

I might put this up here for Ken's eagle-eyed analysis:

Posted Image

This is from my writing instruments thread about dealing with new-pen issues. I used a fairly extreme range of pens: it's an adaptable hand, if nothing else.

...and with a semi-flex shiro nib, this:

Posted Image
S.S.S. review by Kev.1, on Flickr

#122 Crim

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 14:54

I used to print exclusively. The first pic is from 2 years ago and the 2nd one would be around 1/2 a year later. Maybe a little longer.
Posted Image
Posted Image


About 1 1/2 years ago I started playing around with cursive after reading all the cursive vs printing topics. My first attempts were pretty horrid. The middle text in the picture was a recent entry in my journal and the last bit of text is something I wrote today (with the intention of making it look nice).

I don't think my cursive has changed much. I can go through recent entries where it still looks pretty messy though not as messy as that first attempt. I haven't tried to improve my handwriting cause I guess I really don't know how to. Though I'm always trying to write with neater.

Oh goodness... wrote who's instead of whose. :bonk: I thought my brain was finally getting past those stupid errors.

Posted Image

#123 GhostShip Blue

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Posted 12 July 2011 - 02:26

Ugh. So I show up and see all these tidy, expressive hands and have to submit my janky, brutish letters. I guess I don't have t, but I really would like to hear your suggestions for ways to improve. I don't expect to develop a graceful, stylish hand like some many of you have - I really don't have a lot of time to dedicate to penmanship exercises. 20 minutes a day is going to be a lot for me, although I do try to write at least one letter or journal entry everyday and can certainly use that time to actively work on my penmanship.

Image has been color corrected in Photoshop - which, now that I think about it, probably doesn't add much. Without further ado, here's the disaster at hand:

penmanship sample.jpg

No need to be gentle - I'm a Marine Corps vet. I promise, I can take it.
"If you show us a drunk blonde chick in her underwear, she has to die. That's just how we roll." - I wish I knew who to attribute that to. T'weren't me.

Posted Image
Ain't great, but it's the best I've got. So far.


#124 celesul

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:16

So, I wrote a short Oscar Wilde quotation onto a page containing some old math notes. The math notes are in blue, the quote in black. While my current handwriting is a little inconsistent (although nothing some practice wouldn't fix), it's light years ahead of my old writing, which was the worst my high school had seen for at twenty years, perhaps longer. My TAs in college were not as likely to let me type up work that turned out to be illegible, so I eventually decided to learn to write decently. I already knew that my print quickly degenerated into scrawl, so I tried Spencerian script, which I can manage to make decently readable. One of the things I actually most proud of is managing to write in a straight line. Reading my old hand writing is more deciphering than reading, unfortunately.

This forum helped me get started with revamping my handwriting, although it wasn't until maybe 4 months later that I got my first fountain pen.

IMG_1038.JPG

Edited by celesul, 13 September 2011 - 08:19.


#125 Columba Livia

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 00:56

Before:

Posted Image

After:

Posted Image

This is my everyday handwriting. It is not slow or fussy, but how I write notes, my diary or birthday cards. I used a Papermate flair/tempo/nylon (Different names, same felt-tip pen), which is my favoured pen for everyday writing, to write this (upper sample was written with a fountain pen).

I learnt Nelson Script (an upright unlooped joined script, rather Italic in style) at school. It did not do me well as you can see. However, once I tried American style cursive things started to improve. Based on my experience with this script, I believe that American style cursive is a contemporary living hand that is fast and practical, as well as having an elegance and beauty which no other mono-line script can match.

What I like most about American style cursive is the flowing nature of the capitals and the great variety of alternate forms possible. Handwriting is movement and rhythm and I admire letter-forms which embody this.

Along with Spencerian and Ornamental penmanship, it is one of the jewels of American and world history and culture.

I was inspired to take up the pen in a systematic and serious fashion by what I saw on IAMPETH. After a year of mostly daily practice and study (1 hr+) this is where I'm at. I've been practising from the lessons in F.W Tamblyn's Home Instructor in Penmanship. You can find it at John Neil books and on the Ziller of Kansas City website.

The book also contains lessons for Ornamental penmanship, flourishing, engrosser's script (copperplate style script) and broad pen and drawn letters. I recommend the book highly, and combined with the books available on the IAMPETH website I feel there is nothing better for improving your handwriting and, if you wish, acting as a launchpad for the study and practise of calligraphy.

I will be devoting less time to American cursive now though, since I feel I'm finally ready to start studying and practising ornamental penmanship, having got a start in spacing, rhythm, form and movement.

Edited by Columba Livia, 11 October 2011 - 01:20.


#126 texaspenman

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 03:22

Before:

Posted Image

After:

Posted Image

This is my everyday handwriting. It is not slow or fussy, but how I write notes, my diary or birthday cards. I used a Papermate flair/tempo/nylon (Different names, same felt-tip pen), which is my favoured pen for everyday writing, to write this (upper sample was written with a fountain pen).

I learnt Nelson Script (an upright unlooped joined script, rather Italic in style) at school. It did not do me well as you can see. However, once I tried American style cursive things started to improve. Based on my experience with this script, I believe that American style cursive is a contemporary living hand that is fast and practical, as well as having an elegance and beauty which no other mono-line script can match.

What I like most about American style cursive is the flowing nature of the capitals and the great variety of alternate forms possible. Handwriting is movement and rhythm and I admire letter-forms which embody this.

Along with Spencerian and Ornamental penmanship, it is one of the jewels of American and world history and culture.

I was inspired to take up the pen in a systematic and serious fashion by what I saw on IAMPETH. After a year of mostly daily practice and study (1 hr+) this is where I'm at. I've been practising from the lessons in F.W Tamblyn's Home Instructor in Penmanship. You can find it at John Neil books and on the Ziller of Kansas City website.

The book also contains lessons for Ornamental penmanship, flourishing, engrosser's script (copperplate style script) and broad pen and drawn letters. I recommend the book highly, and combined with the books available on the IAMPETH website I feel there is nothing better for improving your handwriting and, if you wish, acting as a launchpad for the study and practise of calligraphy.

I will be devoting less time to American cursive now though, since I feel I'm finally ready to start studying and practising ornamental penmanship, having got a start in spacing, rhythm, form and movement.


Amazing! I too adore the spencerian system of handwriting. Your improvement is incredible! Posted Image
Posted Image "Of all of the instruments of war, diplomacy, and revolution, the pen has been the silent giant determining the fate of nations." -Justin Brundin

#127 Ken Fraser

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 21:59

This is from my writing instruments thread about dealing with new-pen issues. I used a fairly extreme range of pens: it's an adaptable hand, if nothing else.

I think that your handwriting is clear and distinctive with all of the nibs. My suggestion is to try to open out the lettering, as legibilty would improve - your writing is already neat.

It's interesting to see more extended lettering in your semi-flex nib example and the resulting improvement in clarity.

....just a couple of observations.

Ken

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#128 DLindenbaum

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 16:19

Here's my handwriting from several days ago:

Posted Image

And here's my handwriting now:

Posted Image
(Would just like to thank Columba Livia for the idea of the statement above.)

I've shown my dad and he says I write much like my late grandma (whom was born 1931). That is a very great compliment to receive. I've been practicing the Palmer Method of Business Writing for a few days now. Slowly but surely I shall write unlike a thirteen-year-old does now.

Edited by DLindenbaum, 05 November 2011 - 16:20.

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#129 Ken Fraser

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 09:27

[quote name='CatBookMom' timestamp='1304108186' post='1966457']
Posted Image

CatBookMom,

I think that your beautifully clear, monoline italic is an object lesson to those who feel that italic has to be written with an edged nib to look good.

Thanks for posting.

Ken

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#130 CatBookMom

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 18:01


Posted Image

CatBookMom,

I think that your beautifully clear, monoline italic is an object lesson to those who feel that italic has to be written with an edged nib to look good.

Thanks for posting.

Ken


:cloud9: Thank you for those kind words, Ken.

#131 sirShiggy

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 12:21

I only joined yesterday, so I can't show what you guys have done for me yet, but this is my handwriting before and after fountain pens:
BEFORE:
Handwriting pre-FP both.JPG
LEFT:1.5 years before FP RIGHT: Week Before FP

AFTER:
Handwriting post-FP both.JPG
LEFT: Week after FP RIGHT: 1.5 years after FP

Enjoy :)

#132 CatBookMom

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:39

I only joined yesterday, so I can't show what you guys have done for me yet, but this is my handwriting before and after fountain pens:


Enjoy :)



:thumbup: You've made a lot of improvement! Practice, practice. I have found that copying out poems or even a favorite book (I'm currently transcribing Fellowship of the Ring, :embarrassed_smile: ) has really helped my handwriting, just taking 30 minutes or so regularly to slow down and focus on the letters and the words, the spacing and the shapes.

#133 sirShiggy

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 23:30

What a good idea! I've always felt guilty when I was faffing about with my handwriting when I should be revising for my GCSEs, but I may just try and transcribe The Great Gatsby, or I might start out with Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson so it doubles for a bit of revision!

Edited by sirShiggy, 15 April 2012 - 09:39.


#134 P.A.R.

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 00:15

From January:
Posted Image
From today:
Posted Image
I think my letters' vertical sizing and "t-crossing" has improved. Any other suggestions?

Edited by P.A.R., 15 April 2012 - 00:16.

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#135 CatBookMom

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 00:51

I think my letters' vertical sizing and "t-crossing" has improved. Any other suggestions?


There's a definite improvement! Your current hand is more uniform and easier to read, most of the 'a's are closed, and yes, the t's are crossed. I wonder if you wouldn't do better if you made the guidelines further apart; a wider spacing would keep your ascenders and descenders from crossing. Some of your descenders meet the lowest of the letters (2nd para, 3rd- and 2nd-to-last lines: 'g' in picking meets the 'm' met- below).

Also, try to use only 7/8 or so of the space between the lines; don't take up the whole area. This will mean shortening your capitals and ascenders a bit.

These are just suggestions. I hope they are useful.

#136 P.A.R.

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:12

There's a definite improvement! Your current hand is more uniform and easier to read, most of the 'a's are closed, and yes, the t's are crossed. I wonder if you wouldn't do better if you made the guidelines further apart; a wider spacing would keep your ascenders and descenders from crossing. Some of your descenders meet the lowest of the letters (2nd para, 3rd- and 2nd-to-last lines: 'g' in picking meets the 'm' met- below).

Also, try to use only 7/8 or so of the space between the lines; don't take up the whole area. This will mean shortening your capitals and ascenders a bit.

These are just suggestions. I hope they are useful.

I have to use college ruled paper for essays and most of my notes, but I have been considering getting the wide ruled Staples Sustainable Earth legal pads for homework assignments I have to turn in (I love the paper in the college ruled spirals.)

I try to avoid running into descenders as I write the next line, but sometimes I forget to look ahead :rolleyes:

As my week-long spring break from school just started, the majority of my writing will be in my journal (so practice will be limited.) I'll try to incorporate your advice though - thanks!

Is the slant a problem as far as legibility is concerned?

Edited by P.A.R., 15 April 2012 - 04:13.

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#137 CatBookMom

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:17

I have to use college ruled paper for essays and most of my notes, but I have been considering getting the wide ruled Staples Sustainable Earth legal pads for homework assignments I have to turn in (I love the paper in the college ruled spirals.)

I try to avoid running into descenders as I write the next line, but sometimes I forget to look ahead :rolleyes:

As my week-long spring break from school just started, the majority of my writing will be in my journal (so practice will be limited.) I'll try to incorporate your advice though - thanks!

Is the slant a problem as far as legibility is concerned?



OK, maybe you should try to focus on writing a bit smaller, which should help with the overlap, whether with college-ruled or wide-ruled paper. Your slant is fairly steep, but if that's what's natural for you, then you have to decide if you want to alter it. Consistency in slant is possibly more important to legibility than the degree of slant.

In my learning to write cursive italic, I found that it was counter-productive to try to change too many things at once. So I'd suggest you work on writing a bit smaller first and then decide if you want to try to decrease the slant.

Loosening up, using more of the 'whole-arm' approach is good, but you still come down to needing the fine control of your fingers and hand. It's tough trying to balance all of these aspects when you're trying to alter your handwriting. Experiment to find different combinations, though all are going to seem awkward the first few times.

Are you using the Sustainable Earth spiral notebooks? I love those! I use them for all my writing practice now. I didn't realize that the legal pads had a different width in the lines.

Enjoy your spring break! Hope you have good weather for it.