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What Is It?


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#1 OldFatDog

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 03:59

It has a Waterman Emblem #18 nib but no other markings other than what is on the nib. I have been unable to find an Emblem with that type of cap. Note the white dot at the top of the cap. It kind of reminds me of the white dot found on Dunhill pipes. Any help would be appreciated.

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#2 tripcode

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:02

It's a frankenpen. That's a Sheaffer cap, on a Waterman's body. The lever is in the Waterman style, so the body is probably original to the nib. Also, it looks like you have a johnny of a gap between the section and the threads. You might want to stuff that back down in there.

#3 OldFatDog

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:15

Egads. What a way to start a collection! What are the chances of finding the correct cap and a replacement nib? I had taken the pen apart and cut down the sac (was so long it had twisted and bunched) so the gap between the section and the barrel is my own doing. One of the nib tines was heavily bent out of shape and the result of my corrective efforts was to get a very fine type of calligraphy point. This has become frankenpen's daddy!

#4 tripcode

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:34

Honestly, I'd abandon hope of finding a correct cap. I know it can be done for things like 51s, where they made caps to spare, and pens have failed but their caps have been fine and people have them in parts stock, but I really doubt Waterman made spares, and I doubt even more that anyone kept them if they did. You're better off, in my opinion, just tolerating the frankenpen-ness. Frankenpens can be fun-kenpens.

ETA: If it's a thicker nib, then good luck finding one. It's probably easier than the cap, but I know many thicker nibs were melted down in the 70's, 80's, and 90's as their original owners started dying off and people just wanted cash.

Edited by tripcode, 28 February 2013 - 04:37.


#5 AltecGreen

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:58

Honestly, I'd abandon hope of finding a correct cap. I know it can be done for things like 51s, where they made caps to spare, and pens have failed but their caps have been fine and people have them in parts stock, but I really doubt Waterman made spares, and I doubt even more that anyone kept them if they did. You're better off, in my opinion, just tolerating the frankenpen-ness. Frankenpens can be fun-kenpens.



This is far from the truth. You'd be surprised what you can find for vintage pens. To find the proper cap, the pen body needs to be identified then you just need to look. There are quite a number of dealers that sell parts. Remember that vintage pens were made in far larger quantities than modern pens. Pens that have not survived intact have had their good parts harvested. It's about the desire to find the correct part and whether it is worth the effort.


See below for examples of what can be found


Posted Image



Posted Image



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Posted Image
"It is traditional and not to be questioned."


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#6 tripcode

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:02


Honestly, I'd abandon hope of finding a correct cap. I know it can be done for things like 51s, where they made caps to spare, and pens have failed but their caps have been fine and people have them in parts stock, but I really doubt Waterman made spares, and I doubt even more that anyone kept them if they did. You're better off, in my opinion, just tolerating the frankenpen-ness. Frankenpens can be fun-kenpens.



This is far from the truth. You'd be surprised what you can find for vintage pens. To find the proper cap, the pen body needs to be identified then you just need to look. There are quite a number of dealers that sell parts. Remember that vintage pens were made in far larger quantities than modern pens. Pens that have not survived intact have had their good parts harvested. It's about the desire to find the correct part and whether it is worth the effort.


WOW! I'm glad I was proven wrong on that! I had no idea there was such a thriving trade in spare parts of that nature.

#7 AltecGreen

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:10

WOW! I'm glad I was proven wrong on that! I had no idea there was such a thriving trade in spare parts of that nature.



A pen is often worth more these days parted out rather than as a whole pen.




PS-the Waterman pen looks like a Waterman Emblem.

Edited by AltecGreen, 28 February 2013 - 05:14.

"It is traditional and not to be questioned."


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#8 paperballs

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:45


Honestly, I'd abandon hope of finding a correct cap. I know it can be done for things like 51s, where they made caps to spare, and pens have failed but their caps have been fine and people have them in parts stock, but I really doubt Waterman made spares, and I doubt even more that anyone kept them if they did. You're better off, in my opinion, just tolerating the frankenpen-ness. Frankenpens can be fun-kenpens.



This is far from the truth. You'd be surprised what you can find for vintage pens. To find the proper cap, the pen body needs to be identified then you just need to look. There are quite a number of dealers that sell parts. Remember that vintage pens were made in far larger quantities than modern pens. Pens that have not survived intact have had their good parts harvested. It's about the desire to find the correct part and whether it is worth the effort.


See below for examples of what can be found


Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image



:puddle:

Is this what a pen show looks like??

#9 AltecGreen

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 00:56

Is this what a pen show looks like??



Yes for the larger shows. BTW-this was around 10:30pm when the shots were taken.
"It is traditional and not to be questioned."


"You gotta get your Pen Posse on!"
-Ethernautrix