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Help With Fountain Pen Issues?


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#1 minimi24

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:59

I've been using a fountain pen that one of my relatives have given over the summer of 2012. Prior to that I was completely new to fountain pens, but within a week I was able to use a fountain pen with ease. I would like to know the model of the Parker pen and what type of nib is it and would it be possible to replace the nib. I say this because the pen tends to write with heavy ink usage and when I use it for notes on plain binder paper it usually seeps through the other end making it difficult to read or write on the other side (Though I've found writing very quickly helps reduce the severity of the ink seeping through).

Thanks,
Anthony
fountain pen without cap
Fountain pen with internal and test write on binder paper front & back

Edited by minimi24, 04 February 2013 - 08:17.


#2 studiohead

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:03

What you have there is a Parker IM. Under the Nib there should be a letter, it should say F or M (The only 2 sizes that a IM has) F is for Fine while M is for Medium. You can buy an IM Section (Not easily found) which is either chrome or gold plate as the one you are having. I am abit surprise to see the gold plate section in this model as I believe it should come with the chrome version. A smaller size will technically be last flow.
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#3 rickap

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 13:36

What you've encountered is called "bleed through" and it is common on inexpensive paper like standard filler paper. The best way to resolve it would be to either use a drier ink like Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Black or an ink formulated for inexpensive paper like Noodler's Black. Noodler's Black would be my choice in this situation.

If you really want a fine nib you might find one by contacting Parker to see if they sell the nib and section assemblies.

You can also look for a better paper. Check the Paper and Pen Paraphernalia sub-forum for recommendations.

:W2FPN:
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#4 Sandy1

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 13:49

Hi Anthony,

:W2FPN:

While the pen just might be the culprit, I reckon the paper is the prime suspect.


"Plain binder paper" has the reputation of being quite hostile to FP use, especially when writing on both sides of the sheet.

My first inclination would be to try a paper that is FP friendly, such as a 24lb [Hewlett Packard] laser print/copy paper, then print your own lines and punch the binder holes. Perhaps you have a few papers around that you can try.

Secondly, I'd try a different ink, such as Rohrer & Klingner Salix. Some might suggest Noodler's Black, but I've not used that stuff. (If searching this Forum or The Ink Review Forum try the searchword 'bleed-through'.)

Last but not least is technique. Ensure that you're using a 'proper' grip and writing with far less pressue on the nib than other writing implements.
(Searchword 'death grip') I write with a brisk light hand - really just guiding the nib as it cruises along under the mass of the pen.

Ink + Pen + Paper = :cloud9:


Bye,
S1


Edited by Sandy1, 04 February 2013 - 16:35.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#5 minimi24

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 23:35

I'm currently using Parker Quink, and yes I've been thinking of trying out Noodler's black (Can't find any near stores, only Amazon for me). The pen also has an 'F' which means fine? Would you reccommend any other fountain pens that may have a extra fine nib within a 10-30 dollar price range? I've been thinking about the Lamy Safari since it's been considered a "work horse".

Thanks for your replies,
Anthony
;)

P.S. I'd rather change the pen's nib or ink than the paper since my instructors don't usually allow such an option with their hand-outs. Sorry if it comes off as rude.
The Safari I'm thinking or buying
Noodler black I'm thinking of buying
Converter that I'm hoping will work for the Safari

Edited by minimi24, 05 February 2013 - 00:01.


#6 mAnuscript69

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:24

I'm currently using Parker Quink, and yes I've been thinking of trying out Noodler's black (Can't find any near stores, only Amazon for me). The pen also has an 'F' which means fine? Would you reccommend any other fountain pens that may have a extra fine nib within a 10-30 dollar price range? I've been thinking about the Lamy Safari since it's been considered a "work horse".

Thanks for your replies,
Anthony
;)

P.S. I'd rather change the pen's nib or ink than the paper since my instructors don't usually allow such an option with their hand-outs. Sorry if it comes off as rude.
The Safari I'm thinking or buying
Noodler black I'm thinking of buying
Converter that I'm hoping will work for the Safari


Lamy's extra fine nibs might not be fine enough to prevent bleed through (depends on the ink you're using), though Noodler's Black definitely helps with cheaper paper.

A good option in your price range would be a Pilot 78G with a fine nib. It writes a very fine line, much finer than the EF Safari. I'd say the line is comparable to a 0.5mm mechanical pencil or Pilot G-2, on paper of reasonable quality.

Since you cannot change the paper that you're using, I'd say your best bet would be to go with Noodler's Black. Also, as Sandy has mentioned, try writing with a little less pressure.

Lastly, that Z24 converter will work with the Safari.

#7 Sandy1

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 13:54

Hi,

It is an unfortunate fact that when one must use FP hostile paper, the choice of inks and pens becomes much more narrow.

I suggest getting the Noodler's Black, and working on your technique.
Also, be aware that your pen might be 'tweaked' and the ink manipulated to give a better match to the paper.

It is a bit of a process, which rewards patience; and I suggest changing only one variable at a time during the process. IMHO it is too early to s
plash-out for another pen that may not balance the equation of

Ink + Pen + Paper = :cloud9:


Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#8 dduran

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 14:07

Why not get Noodler's X-Feather? Won't that minimize bleed-through and feathering? (I'm asking because I'm thinking of getting one)

#9 minimi24

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:31

The Pilot 78G seems like a good choice but I can't seem to find it on Amazon. (Any suggestions? I'm kind of thinking here.. With a fountain pen I always try to write with good technique since I consider writing with such a instrument a hobby. I was hoping for the Safari since one of my peers has one and he seems to have no problem writing on regular binder paper; the x-feather seems like it's really rare. The biggest problem right now is probably that the Parker Quink I'm currently using is too watery and seems to write in almost bold on regular binder paper. (On high quality paper it writes like a charm with no problems though)

Again, thanks for the helpful replies!,
Anthony

P.S Is the Pilot 78G a cartridge filled pen or could I use bottled ink (preferred).

Edited by minimi24, 06 February 2013 - 01:43.


#10 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:02

Good to better paper cost a couple cans of Coke or cups of Starbucks coffee more.
By me 90g/22 pounds is minimum paper.

I have paper for my computer...80 g crud.
And I have other papers of 90, 100, 105, 110, 120g and higher for scribbling pleasure.

When I was noobie, I had some Lamy Turquoise, that was nice but sort of blaaaaa.
In ink reviews, were two Lamy Turquoise reviews on 90g paper...it shaded. :yikes:
I had a small booklet of Oxford Optic 90g paper. Lamy Turquoise shaded on that. :cloud9:
That was when I learned that paper is more important than ink.


Get your self some good to better paper and have some fun with shading inks.
It will make you regular ink sit up and dance too.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 06 February 2013 - 04:03.

Due to Mauricio's improved definition of Super-flex, I no longer use the term Easy Full Flex.

 

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing with a touch of flair. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For bit more of that get a 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex. Both spread tines 3X.  Those are not "Flex" nibs. 

 

Odd, how many who should know better, compares Japanese F (which equals EF), with Western F, with out a second thought, but do not compare Japanese B with Western B.

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#11 Dillo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:20

Hi,

I have to write on all sorts of paper every day. I don't often think of the paper that I'm using. You might want the flow on that nib reduced slightly to make a drier line. The Lamy is also a good choice. Most of them come out of the box with moderate flow, and you can easily find spare nibs for it.

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#12 Sandy1

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:40

. . . ✄ I was hoping for the Safari since one of my peers has one and he seems to have no problem writing on regular binder paper; the x-feather seems like it's really rare. The biggest problem right now is probably that the Parker Quink I'm currently using is too watery and seems to write in almost bold on regular binder paper. (On high quality paper it writes like a charm with no problems though)

Again, thanks for the helpful replies!,
Anthony

P.S Is the Pilot 78G a cartridge filled pen or could I use bottled ink (preferred).


Hi,

As one of your peers "seems to have no problem writing on regular binder paper", I suggest asking that person what ink s/he is using. Perhaps you could try some of that ink in your pen.

Also, as you've tried your current pen+ink combo on other paper, and have achieved good results, then I believe that is a good indicator that the Quink+binder paper combo is not a good one.

The Pilot 78G + F nib is a cartridge / converter pen. It has a strong following, but I've had two of them and both were set aside after much tinkering. As for the Safari, I have three (the Notorious Pink Safari, the Non-Nudist Pink Safari, and one in Charcoal) and all are very good, though the nibs are not too consistent.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#13 minimi24

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:53

Thanks!
I think I'm going to get a Pilot 78G with my current budget, and the Lamy Safari as my next buy.

Much appreciation,
Anthony