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Nib On My Lamy 2000


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#1 jipajapa

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:37

Hey guys,

I'm new to this forum and have a question. I've been using fountain pens for a bit, but recently upgraded to a Lamy 2000, which I really like. I've had it for about 3 days, and it's been great, but today it seemed that the feel of the nib changed a bit. Upon inspection, when I write it seems like the right tine is bending away from the feed more than the left tine. Is there a reason that would happen?

When I look at it under a loupe, they look to be lined up perfectly. Am I just overthinking things?

Thanks for any help you may be able to give!

#2 sirksael

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 08:20

I would say this is normal. the tines are flexible and bend when you put them on paper. the fact that one bends more than the other probably indicates that you rotate the pen in such a way that there is more weight on one than the other.
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#3 jakelogan

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 10:13

I would say this is normal. the tines are flexible and bend when you put them on paper. the fact that one bends more than the other probably indicates that you rotate the pen in such a way that there is more weight on one than the other.

+1
As long as it doesn't affect performance, this is completely fine.

On one of my M800s, one tine is larger than the other due to a slanted-cut slit.
On my M400, the feed is off center and off angle from the nib.
On my 146, one tine is noticably "taller" than the other even when lined.
On my Sonnet, one tine seems to be away from the feed/the nib itself is off angle.

All four of the mentioned pens are excellent writers and daily users with no problems.
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#4 jipajapa

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 15:08

It doesn't seem to be affecting performance too much, but it does feel scratchier than it did when I tried it out in the store. I'm worried I'm just overthinking it, but I'm worried that I'll miss my window to send it back for a replacement if there's something actually wrong with the pen.

#5 NKessler

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 15:27

If you have any serious doubts, send the pen to Lamy or whoever you purchased it from for a quick once-over. You'll likely be using that pen for the rest of your life, so making sure it meets your needs now is very important.

You are probably over thinking it a bit, but peace of mind is definitely something worth pursuing.

#6 New_Falcon

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 16:01


I would say this is normal. the tines are flexible and bend when you put them on paper. the fact that one bends more than the other probably indicates that you rotate the pen in such a way that there is more weight on one than the other.

+1
As long as it doesn't affect performance, this is completely fine.

On one of my M800s, one tine is larger than the other due to a slanted-cut slit.
On my M400, the feed is off center and off angle from the nib.
On my 146, one tine is noticably "taller" than the other even when lined.
On my Sonnet, one tine seems to be away from the feed/the nib itself is off angle.

All four of the mentioned pens are excellent writers and daily users with no problems.



Are you serious that those pens all have issues?

I like using fountain pens but the idea of spending a lot of money on a pen with it not being 100% annoys me. Those pens you listed aren't cheap ones.

#7 bphollin

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 17:28

Lamy 2000 nibs are soft, even springy. They are not meant to be flexible in the sense that flex pens are flexible, however. You could spring the nib if you treat it like a flex nib.

#8 sjs

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 18:00

I like using fountain pens but the idea of spending a lot of money on a pen with it not being 100% annoys me. Those pens you listed aren't cheap ones.


Many expensive pens don't come 100%. Make sure to order from someone reputable so you can get help or return items that aren't up to snuff.

Steve
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#9 Mafia Geek

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 21:46

It could also have something to do with the ink you have in it. If the ink is a little dry (I found Lamy blue-black to do this) it will feel scratchy when writing. I had a Lamy 2000 EF that was a little dry writing for my preferences unless it had a lubricating ink in it (like Parker Quink or a Noodler's Eel/Polar ink). After running a safety razor blade (not one used for cutting but one used for shaving, much thinner) through it it wrote like a dream for pretty well any ink. The razor just increased the ink flow a little.

Likely the easiest thing you can do is look at how you have the pen rotated when you write. If you rotate the pen a little counterclockwise from how you are currently holding it, it should help with that as the tips should be touching the paper more evenly. If you have it rotated clockwise a little too far then due to the angle of the pen the right tip with touch the page before the left does, which when you go to write means the right one will have to flex more to allow the left to make contact.

Try rotating the pen in your hand counterclockwise just a little bit (about a minute or two) and see if that makes any difference. If it doesn't, try a different ink. If that doesn't do it, consider sending it to Lamy or using a razor blade (using razor blade will likely void warranty though so I hesitate to tell you to do that).

Hope that helps, let us know if it does.

#10 ttakacs

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 01:44

Ouch! A razor blade will work, but it can damage the point. I too recently acquired a Lamy 2000 (fine nib) and found it to write slightly dry. I used some 35mm film to clean out a bit of gunk in the nib slit and then flushed with JB's Perfect Pen Flush -- the flow increased just enough to suit.