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Thank you, Dr. Manfred Lamy


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#1 Kaweco

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 20:09

1930, after 2 years of cooperation, Parker left Osmia in Heidelberg, Germany. Parker`s export manager C. Josef Lamy was set free and began to produce his own writing articles under the name "Orthos". The first fountainpens looked like a Parker Duofold flattop copy but a few months later Lamy presented his first patent, a pen/ pencil combo. After ww2 Lamy associated with the Artus Kaufmann Companie and the name of their products was "Artus", like Artus- Favorit or Artus- Ballit.
The Lamy 27 was introduced in 1952, it was a very successful model and the first one which was produced under the name "LAMY".
Dr. Manfred Lamy, the son of C.J Lamy, took over the firm in 1966 and made basically changes in the product lines. The production of the LAMY 2000 was a risk. The cool design in Makrolon, Steel and Platinium coated gold nib which was made by Gerd Müller was outstanding, but it was absolutely not sure that an expensive article with no golden ornaments would be a best seller in these times. But the 2000 is produced until today, only with marginal changes. Several writing articles followed and some look like amazing art objects of the Bauhaus era.
The commercial paper advertising didn`t change for decades: Wriring articles in original size and a hand written sentence. Nothing more than pure understatement.
After more than 40 years of successful work for his firm which he owns 100%, Dr. Manfred Lamy retires last week from his leadership. He is now 70 years old, got several awards for his outstanding products and joins as a member of the advisory board, which will influence the firm philosopy in the future. The new CEO is Bernhard M. Rösner, he had worked for Mercedes Benz and Margarete Steiff (toys).
Thank you, Dr. Manfred Lamy for 40 years of excellent ideas in the world of writing articles.
Kind Regards
Thomas

pic:
Orthos from 1930/ 1931
LAMY 2000, old, with the letter "L" at the filling knob
Lamy- Lady, unbreakable Rosenthal porcellaine gold plated, produced until 2003

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#2 HyperCamper

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 20:25

I suppose that resume warrants a great, big "Thank you!" indeed! smile.gif
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#3 johnr55

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 01:44

Let me add my appreciation for the 2000, along with a couple of other Lamy pens I bought in the 70's and still look spacey.

#4 saintsimon

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 02:26

One of the reasons, which make Lamy a sympathetic company in my eyes, is the lack of the 'premium' hybris other German makers often exhibit (Do I have to name some ? biggrin.gif ). Others are a reasonable pricing and products which deliver on promises.

Edited by saintsimon, 10 November 2006 - 20:28.


#5 James P

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 16:56

I really like Lamys for their clean designs - not a lot of ornamentation to clutter up the pen visually, plus the fact that they just plain work well.

A few months ago, I inadvertently stabbed myself with my Safari. Two minutes later, I was signing my name (literally in blood, as it turned out) - but the nib never skipped a beat. It still writes beautifully.

James P.

#6 Maja

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 19:31

QUOTE(James P @ Nov 10 2006, 08:56 AM)
I really like Lamys for their clean designs - not a lot of ornamentation to clutter up the pen visually, plus the fact that they just plain work well.

<clapping>

Hear, hear!! biggrin.gif

All of my Lamys are great writers, and I love the thought that went into the designs. smile.gif
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#7 DonS

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 02:11

Gotta say, I'm charmed by Lamy too. My ex "inherited" my original 2000 (1970) in our divorce many years ago. The cap had split. I saw another one in a local shop recently and bought it, this time with F point. Better for me; pretty wide anyway.

My only complaint. The cap doesn't stay firmly in place when you are writing. I've tried various remedies, none very pretty. Problem is with the shape of the barrel and the slipperiness of the resin.

#8 HDoug

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 18:43

Let me join in to thank Manfred Lamy for the perfectly functional, slickly designed writing instruments. My current favorite, the Al-Star:


Uh oh! I think Gort has his eye on one!

Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!

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#9 Russ

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 22:02

Dr. Lamy deserves great applause. Lamy products represent, IMHO, the best in German character: flawless performance and few words.

I've had my Lamy 2000 for a month and love it.
My daughter can't keep her hands of her new Safari (1.1 italic nib). She writes, doodles, and draws with it.

Thank you, Dr. Lamy.

#10 cmeisenzahl

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 18:58

Wonderful post, Lamy is my favorite brand too! ;-)

#11 Dillo

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 19:10

Hi,

I like Lamy's customer service very much! biggrin.gif

Dillon

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#12 Hephaestus

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 00:01

We all admire companies like Pelikan for using screw in nib/feed units, but on Lamy pens the nib slides right on the feed so you can replace it independently. Even given this design, I've never experienced hard starting or any feed problems with a Lamy.

The only non fountain pen I look forward to using is the Lamy Swift rollerball. It had a nice weight to the pen, the cartridges glide across the page, and when you click the pen to use it the clip retracts into the pen body leaving the pen a smooth cylinder. Beautiful.

Meanwhile, the Lamy tri-pen with pen, pencil and fine highlighter is a joy for marking and editing documents.

Have I mentioned the Lamy ink bottle? Outstanding design with a collector divot in the bottom of the well, and a spool of cleaning paper around the base so to absorb excess ink from the nib.

There are individual pens that I like more, but there is no other complete product line that I respect more than Lamy’s. I hope that never changes.

-Ryan

#13 MYU

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 06:30

Thomas, thank you very much for that tribute to Dr. Lamy! I learned a lot from what you wrote--hard to find that info on the Internet.

I too greatly appreciate Dr. Lamy's achievements. I'm a big fan of the 27. It's my "alternative Parker 51". Although slightly smaller, it has a nicer 'art deco' style cap, a very useful ink window section, and an extremely reliable piston filler with attached screw cap (no blind cap needed). The nib is semi-hooded, so at least you have a little more visual appeal and they write quite beautifully. Also, the nib section unscrews very easily--interchanging is a snap (almost like Pelikan). I find the Lamy 27 starts just as quickly as a 51.

So technically I think the Lamy 27 wins over the Parker 51. But the Parker has that undeniable enormous legacy and a bit more rugged feel... that's why I like them both as much.
smile.gif

I'll have to post a comparative photo expose on these models (I have a 27 and a 51 of the same color scheme).
Posted Image
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#14 brh

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 06:58

QUOTE(MYU @ Jan 4 2007, 06:30 AM)
I'll have to post a comparative photo expose on these models (I have a 27 and a 51 of the same color scheme).

Yes, please do!

#15 MYU

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 08:16

QUOTE(brh @ Jan 4 2007, 01:58 AM)
QUOTE(MYU @ Jan 4 2007, 06:30 AM)
I'll have to post a comparative photo expose on these models (I have a 27 and a 51 of the same color scheme).

Yes, please do!

Done!

Lamy 27 & Parker 51 comparison

Edited by MYU, 05 January 2007 - 08:17.

Posted Image
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#16 EventHorizon

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 23:56

QUOTE(Hephaestus @ Dec 19 2006, 12:01 AM)
Have I mentioned the Lamy ink bottle? Outstanding design with a collector divot in the bottom of the well, and a spool of cleaning paper around the base so to absorb excess ink from the nib.

There are individual pens that I like more, but there is no other complete product line that I respect more than Lamy’s. I hope that never changes.

-Ryan

I have an 8 year old Lamy Safari that I use daily and have had zero issue. I also have the same ink well.

FYI - The Lamy ink works pretty good in my Pelikan M200
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#17 kirchh

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 15:56

I just purchased a used Lamy 2000, which is an amazing writer, and I am also very impressed with its construction and heft. I disassembled the front end to give it a good cleaning, and I was surprised to find that the nib (which is at least a BB, perhaps wider) is marked 18K.

Does this give a clue as to its age or intended market? Are there other ways to data a 2000?

Thanks!
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#18 Namo

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 14:48

Just want to thank you for this nice and interesting post.

amonjak.com

cropped-amonjak-partie-4-de-4_page_4-modifiee1.jpg  

free 70 pages graphic novel. Enjoy!


#19 Kaweco

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 20:21

Just want to thank you for this nice and interesting post.

Hello Namo
Thanks for reading, alas this article is more than 3 years old. I made some more historical investigationes and have to correct some thoughts about the early days of Artus.
Artus appeared in 1936 or 1937 as a fountainpen factory but changed their profession to a fountainpen- mail order- trading compagnie in 1939. Until 1941 Artus/Kaufmann and Orthos/Lamy always had the same post adress and the same phone number and together they moved to a larger factory building in 1940. Orthos fountainpens are extremely rare to be found in the wild and on the markets although the trade mark Orthos existed for 19 years. I suppose that Orthos and Artus had ever been the same firm and Orthos disappeared when Artus came on display. The idea for a mail- order trading surely came from Lamy who had worked for Parker and introduced American production and trading methods to the old continent. But he joined a battle against the union of the German stationary and writing equipment sellers because it was outrageous in the old times not to buy a fountainpen in a special shop.
Artus/ Kaufmann disappeared in 1943 and Lamy changed his name in 1949 to: Artus, C. Josef Lamy. Artus was deleted in 1972.
Artus- Ballit, -Favorit, and -Record date from the 50th
Kind Regards
Thomas

#20 Namo

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 07:35

Thanky again. It is one of the many nice thing here that we still can access so many threads - it is a hudge memory of pen world. And such articles are always interessting.

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#21 beluga

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 16:13

I very much like Lamy for all the reasons mentioned here already:

For me, Lamy stands for simple, elegant, innovative and functional designs.
Lamy has not forgotten the middle range price segment, offers exceptional value for money and does not get carried away chasing a "lifestyle" or "luxury brand" image.
Lamy customer service is responsive, fast, efficient and extremely helpful

Lamy has developed a knack for coming out with fresh new ideas, has managed to involve some of the best European designers, but has also continued to follow the maxim that "form follows function."

For a long time now Lamy has become one of my favourite brands.



B.

#22 MiamiArchStudent

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 17:23

Granted I just bought my Lamy, I love it! The quality is amazing and the minimalist design is, to me at least, a real eye-catcher.
What I'm looking for: Montblanc 132, 234 1/2, 235, 422 and 432. Any help would be most appreciated.

#23 Spector

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 07:08

I really like Lamys for their clean designs - not a lot of ornamentation to clutter up the pen visually, plus the fact that they just plain work well.

A few months ago, I inadvertently stabbed myself with my Safari. Two minutes later, I was signing my name (literally in blood, as it turned out) - but the nib never skipped a beat. It still writes beautifully.

James P.



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#24 ivysherisse

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Posted 20 March 2010 - 05:43

I love Lamy!! I got an old 26p and a vista (bought used)... both works wonderfully.
I think I'll probably start collecting diffent safari colors soon (as soon as I get hold of more money! lol).

#25 Robert Alan

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 04:34

QUOTE(brh @ Jan 4 2007, 01:58 AM)QUOTE(MYU @ Jan 4 2007, 06:30 AM)I'll have to post a comparative photo expose on these models (I have a 27 and a 51 of the same color scheme).
Yes, please do!
Done!

Lamy 27 & Parker 51 comparison


Greetings! I really have enjoyed this post.

Please note that Lamy models 27, 99 and 2000 are related in their modular design, nib shape and feed design. Also, the Lamy Ratio has the same inner-workings and the nibs are inter-changeable with 27 and 99 nibs. One can easily cannibalize parts from less-expensive Ratios to fix 27s. The 2000, and other Lamys, can be easily dismantled by hand (no tools are, generally, required). The ability to service these fountain pens with such facility is also a credit to Dr. Lamy's original design concept.

The Studio series and Safari/AL-Star series have a similar modular, interchangeable parts aspect although the design is not the same as the original 27/2000 concept. The nibs of Studios & Safaris are exactly the same shape and easily slide off the feed. Personally, I think the steel Studio nibs--robotically produced--are better than the 14K "hand-finished" nibs.

Cheers, Robert
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