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Noodlers Manjiro Nakahama Whaleman's Sepia


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#31 Jared

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 11:59

It stinks! Literally, like lighter fluid, or some type of photographic chemicals.

The color is interesting--goes on like a dark red, but dries like something that you'd get off of your dipstick before needing to change your oil. I'm not sure what it's going to do to my Bexley Simplicity that I've loaded it in. We'll see...



#32 Pictrix

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 05:28

I like the backstory on the ink, and was considering getting a bottle of it for a gift... but I had one question:


Is this one of those "thick" inks, like Noodler's "Socrates"?
Which is to say it can be hard starting in fine/dry writers?


Thanks in advance for any input...

-Pic

#33 loweevan

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 05:51

QUOTE (Pictrix @ Apr 16 2009, 01:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I like the backstory on the ink, and was considering getting a bottle of it for a gift... but I had one question:


Is this one of those "thick" inks, like Noodler's "Socrates"?
Which is to say it can be hard starting in fine/dry writers?


Thanks in advance for any input...

-Pic

This is quite a thick ink. While I've never used Socrates, I think that it might be similar from what I've read about peoples' problems with Socrates. I don't have any flow issues with this ink once it's going, but it does have a few issues with start ups sometimes. Other times, it works like a dream. My experience hasn't been consistent. I also haven't experimented with diluting it slightly, which others seem to have had success with in improving flow/start up issues with the thicker eternal inks. Also, it tends to cling to the feed and nib a bit, which I take to be a trait of the eternal inks in general. This last thing isn't a big deal, it just takes a little more flushing and soaking to rid the pen of all traces of it.

I think that as long as the recipient is willing to put up with a little fussiness, the backstory, label design, and unique traits of this ink make it a fine gift.

- Evan

#34 buffalobil

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 11:13

Evan, in my experience is correct. This ink is fairly thick and dry. At my office three of us use fountain pens and share ink. Each of us have had start up issues with this ink. Each of us have used different pens in different nib sizes. That being said, we still love the color of the ink and find that once started, it is very well behaved.

#35 alkman

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 00:08

I had some in my MB Chopin and let it sit for a few days and it was like like gum getting it to flow again. I had a similar experience with Tiannenmen Red which, in no pen at the time, ever flowed properly.

As a side note, both this color and Galileo Brown match some of the inks used in the documents on display at the Galileo Exhibit here in Philadelphia.

#36 Amused

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 13:23

I wish this ink would behave nicely. The start up issue really bother me. The only pen that it works well with is my Pelikan M200 w/ "Binderized" M250 Cursive Italic Nib (0.7mm). In all other pens (various EF and F nibbers), after the first use, the ink would progressively exhibit start up problems and ultimately just clog within 48 hours.

When the ink does flow, the color is a nice sepia (a worn grayed brick red to my eye), definitely not the red biased sepia on JetPens' site. I'd be using it a lot more if the flow wasn't a problem. It's just not reliable enough for me in my daily writers to take to my regular meetings...I learned that the hard way sad.gif

I believe my bottle's from JetPens' second run, so my experience may not be the same as someone's with the first batch.

#37 Goodwhiskers

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 17:56

Does diluting this ink with water (ink:water 9:1? 6:1? 4:1?) improve the behavior?

#38 Amused

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 00:59

While cleaning out one of my Pelikan's, I noticed the color separation of this ink. I thought it was interesting and figured it would be nice to share. The picture was from my iPhone so it doesn't do the colors justice, but there are shades of black, brown, green and red here.

3453564723_07048dbb76.jpg

#39 DerekB

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 00:09

Hi everybody,

I just had to revive this old thread to indicate (warn) that I had some problems with this ink. I just received a bottle in the mail from JetPens (great seller, no issues nor affiliation with them) today. I promptly filled my XF Lamy 2000, which writes more like an F or even an M, depending on the wetness of the ink. When filled with Whaleman's Sepia, it was nearly unusable. Extremely dry and inconsistent (maybe "gloopy" is the word). It was so dry that it almost felt as if I were damaging my pen by dragging the raw metal against the paper unlubricated. And this pen is my *smoothest* writer!

I flushed the 2000 (reverted to the always-lovely Aircorp Blue Black), and I was afraid that the Sepia was going to go to waste, but then I decided to try it in my Lamy CP1, which has a true medium nib. I'm happy to say that the ink behaves wonderfully in this pen, and I do quite like the color. Maybe this is inconsistent batch-to-batch, but I can definitely see the purple undertones in mine.

Overall, I'm not *thrilled* with my purchase, because I'd really prefer that this ink were as wonderfully smooth and wet in my 2000 as Heart Of Darkness is, but at least it's not a total bust, and the color is rather unique.

#40 loweevan

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 02:20

QUOTE (DerekB @ May 18 2009, 08:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi everybody,

I just had to revive this old thread to indicate (warn) that I had some problems with this ink. I just received a bottle in the mail from JetPens (great seller, no issues nor affiliation with them) today. I promptly filled my XF Lamy 2000, which writes more like an F or even an M, depending on the wetness of the ink. When filled with Whaleman's Sepia, it was nearly unusable. Extremely dry and inconsistent (maybe "gloopy" is the word). It was so dry that it almost felt as if I were damaging my pen by dragging the raw metal against the paper unlubricated. And this pen is my *smoothest* writer!

I flushed the 2000 (reverted to the always-lovely Aircorp Blue Black), and I was afraid that the Sepia was going to go to waste, but then I decided to try it in my Lamy CP1, which has a true medium nib. I'm happy to say that the ink behaves wonderfully in this pen, and I do quite like the color. Maybe this is inconsistent batch-to-batch, but I can definitely see the purple undertones in mine.

Overall, I'm not *thrilled* with my purchase, because I'd really prefer that this ink were as wonderfully smooth and wet in my 2000 as Heart Of Darkness is, but at least it's not a total bust, and the color is rather unique.

After using this intermittently, I've found that it does have a tendency to dry out in the feed. Now that you mention it, the feel isn't quite like gliding across the paper, but I don't think that it's a grating feeling either. Gloopy might be just right. Also, I've found that watering it down even 10:1 helps with the consistency even if it doesn't necessarily make it an easier starter.
- Evan

#41 HDoug

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 02:47

So far, I've run 5 loads of this ink through my Pelikan Grand Place without rinsing. No probs to report, flow-wise. For reference, the pen wasn't "running aground" on each of the ink refills. The Grand Place doesn't have an ink window so I reload it when I think it's time, or if I plan to do a lot of writing. It's been in constant rotation and has probably gone maybe 5 days without use on the outside. (I started an ink and fill database at the beginning of the year thinking it might come in handy.)

I like the ink very much, and my snailers are about equally divided on whether it's a purple-brown or a red-brown. Again for reference, I believe it's from the Jetpens first batch.

Doug

#42 deadmuse

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:41

I ordered a bottle of Manjiro Nakahama Whaleman's Sepia from Jetpens a few days ago based on the deep red color that was posted in the picture. What I got was more of a dark grey, so I did a search on it and found this thread (and this site!).

I also wrote to Jetpens and they are aware of the issue. I'm going to exchange my bottle for another.

Their response might explain a few things about the ink:

QUOTE
Initially the Manjiro used to be a dark red, but Noodlers changed it
to a deep sepia brown later. The manufacturer's initial response to our
inquiry was:

*To more accurately reflect the 1840s whalemen's logbook ink color, future
runs beyond the first 46 bottles will be about 8% darker in shade unless
otherwise requested. Reason: after exposing the reformulated giant squid
ink based whalemen's sepia to an ageing oven and pure oxygen to accelerate
ageing effects it became a color more in line with the whalemen's logbooks
of the 1840s than fresh whalemen's sepia appears before ageing. As the
modern ink can never age anywhere near as much as the original organic
whalemen's sepia aged - the color upon first use should reflect the original
aged color as closely as possible. All other properties are the same, but
the initial shade is now darker.*

Edited by deadmuse, 28 July 2009 - 02:42.


#43 loweevan

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 03:09

QUOTE (deadmuse @ Jul 27 2009, 10:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I ordered a bottle of Manjiro Nakahama Whaleman's Sepia from Jetpens a few days ago based on the deep red color that was posted in the picture. What I got was more of a dark grey, so I did a search on it and found this thread (and this site!).

I also wrote to Jetpens and they are aware of the issue. I'm going to exchange my bottle for another.

Their response might explain a few things about the ink:

QUOTE
Initially the Manjiro used to be a dark red, but Noodlers changed it
to a deep sepia brown later. The manufacturer's initial response to our
inquiry was:

*To more accurately reflect the 1840s whalemen's logbook ink color, future
runs beyond the first 46 bottles will be about 8% darker in shade unless
otherwise requested. Reason: after exposing the reformulated giant squid
ink based whalemen's sepia to an ageing oven and pure oxygen to accelerate
ageing effects it became a color more in line with the whalemen's logbooks
of the 1840s than fresh whalemen's sepia appears before ageing. As the
modern ink can never age anywhere near as much as the original organic
whalemen's sepia aged - the color upon first use should reflect the original
aged color as closely as possible. All other properties are the same, but
the initial shade is now darker.*


First, welcome to the board! That does seem to explain the change as we came to understand it. Nathan Tardiff is nothing if not thorough with his work from what I can see. The ink is still a nice color if you can deal with some of the starting issues and the smell. I don't use it frequently, but I still like that it's in my cabinet.
- Evan

#44 Thornton

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 04:32

Deadmuse, thank you for an extremely helpful first post! Although I like the original color better (unfortunately didn't get a bottle) I do appreciate Nathan's attention to detail which I am a stickler for myself. I often wondered if the change in color was intentional or not and this explains it.
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#45 turban1

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Posted 07 August 2009 - 12:02

fascinating.

is it really made from whale, or is that just marketing for japanese customers?
"People build themselves a furnace when all they need is a lamp." Maulana Jalaludin Balkhi (Rumi)

#46 djh

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 08:27

I have a bottle of this ink and love it. To me, it is a muddy brown when wet, has red highlights and dries to a dark grey. It works beautifully in some of my pens but just this morning I flushed my Lamy 2000 as I was having hesitation problems with this combination and that is not a good thing for an every day writer.
David

#47 AlaskanWriter

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 11:05

it is a muddy brown when wet, has red highlights and dries to a dark grey.


Bingo! exactly as it is for me.
Not my idea of a sepia, but an interesting ink none the less. It hates my Lamy Safari F, got muddy in it and dried up in the nib after a day or 2 of no use... Haven't put it in any other pen, cleaning it out of that one was hard enough, even being able to force water through with a converter... since my other pens don't have that luxery for cleaning, I'm too scared to try it in them. It flows beautifully from my brush pens though!

Still not sure I like the color...

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#48 docsamson

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 10:45

Received this ink the other day and just now inked my pen with it.

It's a very interesting color. It's kind of looks like an unnatural, artificial brown made from purple, gray and red ink.

I like the color and so far it seems to be a very dry ink, turning my Nakaya soft fine into a somewhat scratchy writer. Most Noodler's make my pen write like a medium but this ink definitely makes it a fine.

I think it's a fine color but I wish Noodler's would release the original red batch under a different name; it looks so nice, I love to have some.

#49 Dave Johannsen

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 13:55

fascinating.

is it really made from whale, or is that just marketing for japanese customers?

My understanding is that it's regular ink whose color is formulated to resemble that found in the log books of old whaling ships (i.e., no whales were harmed in the making of this product).


Dave

#50 bluemagister

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 03:29

This ink is mystery in a bottle and the most excellent review and comments above this one really catch the essence of Manjiro ink. John Manjiro himself was a legendary character and this ink, with its eternal qualities, will also occupy a spot in the legends of ink.

Pairing this ink with a Waterman Phileas and a Pilot Prera (for medium and extra fine point writing) have produced no real ill effects. When you get some bagasse-based papers (like the Staples Eco-Friendly line), this ink becomes NIRVANA and PERFECTION because the light tint of the paper and the tint of the dried ink make it look like an old notebook from the whaling days.

I can DEFINITELY recommend this ink and do so without reservation. It's just one of those things you have to see for yourself and experience firsthand. Pixels definitely cannot do it justice.


**As an aside, if Staples ever comes out with grid and unlined versions of their notebooks, I will never buy anything else but those, ever again**

#51 Crim

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 15:30

PenguinMaster, do you attach your reviews or are they hosted somewhere? Just wondering cause a lot of image hosting sites are firewalled here in China, so it makes reading reviews annoying. But I never have a problem when it comes to your pictures/reviews.

Edited by Crim, 25 September 2009 - 15:32.


#52 penguinmaster

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 15:50

PenguinMaster, do you attach your reviews or are they hosted somewhere? Just wondering cause a lot of image hosting sites are firewalled here in China, so it makes reading reviews annoying. But I never have a problem when it comes to your pictures/reviews.


Crim,

They are hosted on the server of the campus I work on. They give you so much space to host your own personal website (funny thing is they don't even know what the size limit is). So I host them there and link them to the pages here. As to why you can see them in China, but not others I have no clue. My guess is because it's not an image hosting site per-se (I've made it my own personal image hosting space) that you are able to see them.

Your right though, there's no way I could host them all on FPN. In fact I believe my file storage is full here currently with other ink reviews. I can't really port them over though because they can no longer be edited unfortunately.

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#53 Crim

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 18:19

Ah, that's lucky of you then.

I know why I can't view some reviews. Probably because whatever site they're using to host the image is blocked by China. I'd bet that a lot of people here use ImageShack, which is one of the major image hosting sites currently blocked in China.

Oh well, w/e. Would you suggest any good sites to host images? I've ordered a bunch of Noodler's and I'd like to do some reviews as well.

#54 Silas

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 01:23

I just got some of this stuff today. When wet it looks brown-sepia-ish. When dried it looks like dirty motor oil. Unfortunately for me I prefer the wet color.

It seems to be well behaved and good flowing though.



Dirty Motor Oil!! Yep, that describes it well. I traded mine immediately....not for me. Looked like an ink experiment gone bad.

#55 LisaG

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 11:01

One word: THICK, that's what I would call it. Of all the inks I have tried, this one acts the most like a paint. I am using it in a medium nib Kaweco Dia, and boy does it want to skip. It bleeds through my moleskine journal paper (which seems to resist it at first) more than any of my other inks. I have a tentative theory that when Nathan made it darker, he took some of the water out of it, making it thicker. When I added some purified water, it was much easier to write with, but then it feathered. So I will try adding less next time.
Don't get me wrong, I love the color properties. It looks beautiful (if you like dark taupe, which I do) after it dries. It is also fun to watch it change color.
I will find a way to make this ink work for me.

- Lisa

The color matches on my screen, may be a shade or two off on your screen depending on thousands of variables!

<img src="http://facstaff.uww.edu/pellizzt/ink%20reviews/Noodlers%20Manjiro%20Nakahama%20Whaleman's%20Sepia.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />



#56 bluemagister

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 05:18

Despite my previous post, I've spent a month or more working this ink in 4 different pens and keep getting feed clogging after just a few days of use. I think this ink becomes more finicky the longer I have/store it...

I'm taking a break on this and will just fill with some other ink for now.

#57 HDoug

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 08:05

I haven't tried it in a variety of pens, but it's been the ink for my Pelikan 620 Grand Place. Since the first load on March 4, I've put 16 loads through it, rinsing it with water 4 times. So far so good. I have the reddish first batch. Just adding a data point...

Doug

P.S. I'm kinda weird in that I keep a database of my ink fills. I started this a year ago and will be running stats early next month.

#58 jaderabbit

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 00:45

I wish I had read these reviews before buying this ink. I really love the color and the story behind it but it's definitely a pain to write with using my Lamy Al Star fine nib. :(
Maybe I'll just use it for painting instead!

Edited by jaderabbit, 04 January 2010 - 00:48.


#59 QM2

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 00:56

That colour is darn nice!

#60 bluemagister

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 04:48

I've found that the reason this is so scratchy in my pens is that even with the cap on, one or two days of unuse will dry out the feed. To remedy this, I'll twist the converter piston down ever so slightly to force a smidgen of fresh ink into the feed. Once I see liquid ink under the sides of the nib, I write out the little glob of dye that accumulated and the pen writes like it was just flushed and filled. Maybe the solvent in the ink evaporates more rapidly than other Noodler's inks (it certainly smells strong!)

This ink might require a little finagling with the converter, but once you get that ink flow going, you'll be in good shape and I do love the color and durability of it.