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Five Spot model


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#1 simp

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 00:00

Trying to classify flattop ebonite pens produced by Wahl after the Tempoint but before the introduction of the Personal Point nib, I found a reference to a Wahl ''Five-Spot" pen.

This is the reference that I found:

and the full ads is here:

the caption is the one on the left of the central picture.

So it seems that that rosewood pen was called Five-Spot. Does anyone know something about this?

Thanks
Simone

PS a full resolution scan of the AD can be found here; (sorry but that page is in Italian).
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#2 Wahlnut

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 00:33

The "Five Spot" was adapted slang of the day and used in Wahl's advertising when a five-spot meant a $5.00 bill. The pen you are writing about cost $5.00 and so they got labeled the Five Spot pen in print and as a catchy way to refer to them. But they were never called that in the manufacturers catalogs or the order forms. The pen in question is the 1926 to 1928 (pre-Gold Seal), usually called Signature Pens which itself is confusing since only the #8 size #4 nibbed pens were Signature pens. These pens carried the "Signature" nib. This was the era when Wahl Pens in plastics were brand new and the Rosewood without the Gold Seal were a part of that line up. Whether plastic or rosewood, the size 8 #4 nib was the Signature Pen.

Of course manufacturer's model or stock numbers never fail. The pen you are referring to is always known as #847SC. Folks who are familiar with the numbering system will know that the 8 means a #8 size pen, and the 4 stands for a #4 size nib and the last number 7 stands for rosewood. and the SC means side lip. So if you really want to get the name dead on it is a 847SC. But if you want to go with the ad you posted I guess you could call it a Five Spot, but that label was only good for about 4 or 5 months in the ads. The rest of the time they were SIgnature Pens.


Syd
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#3 simp

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 20:18

QUOTE (Wahlnut @ Feb 8 2009, 01:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The "Five Spot" was adapted slang of the day and used in Wahl's advertising when a five-spot meant a $5.00 bill. The pen you are writing about cost $5.00 and so they got labeled the Five Spot pen in print and as a catchy way to refer to them. But they were never called that in the manufacturers catalogs or the order forms. The pen in question is the 1926 to 1928 (pre-Gold Seal), usually called Signature Pens which itself is confusing since only the #8 size #4 nibbed pens were Signature pens. These pens carried the "Signature" nib. This was the era when Wahl Pens in plastics were brand new and the Rosewood without the Gold Seal were a part of that line up. Whether plastic or rosewood, the size 8 #4 nib was the Signature Pen.

Of course manufacturer's model or stock numbers never fail. The pen you are referring to is always known as #847SC. Folks who are familiar with the numbering system will know that the 8 means a #8 size pen, and the 4 stands for a #4 size nib and the last number 7 stands for rosewood. and the SC means side lip. So if you really want to get the name dead on it is a 847SC. But if you want to go with the ad you posted I guess you could call it a Five Spot, but that label was only good for about 4 or 5 months in the ads. The rest of the time they were SIgnature Pens.


Syd

Thank you for the precious informations, I'm italian so I did'nt figure that the name could be adapted slang. The only catalog I have (a 1928 one) is not so easy to decipher (at least for me...) so I could not figure a model number.

But I was searching for a generic label for these pens, and you gave me the right one, I'll call them Signature Pens, that more than adequate.

Regards
Simone


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#4 simp

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 21:06

I found another ADS talking about the "Five spot pen", and two times in this

FiveSpot1.jpg

and:

FiveSpot2.jpg

the full resolution scan can be fount starting at this page:

http://www.fountainp...re-AllMetal.jpg

It seem a nikname used for a short period at the end of 1927.

Simone
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#5 jonveley

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 17:49

In the 1928 catalog, these were referred to as the "New $5 Pens," even though the short ringtops sold for only $3.50. Could be that in 1927, when this ad ran, they hadn't quite settled on a name yet. After all, the company had been running essentially the same product line for 10 years by that point!

Question, Syd: you identified the dates for this as 1926 to 1928, but I thought these weren't introduced until 1927. I looked at the Chrismas 1926 Catalog on the PCA site, and it doesn't say anything about these. I know that document isn't a comprehensive catalog, but if you only had 6 pages wouldn't your newest line be on page 1?

#6 Wahlnut

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 04:49

This might be splitting hairs, but it matters if we are talking when the pen line "began" as in first was manufactured in prototype and when the pen line went to market. in order to introduce the pens for mass sales and to allow time for a a mass advertising campaign, the pens had to be manufactured prior to the big unveiling. There was about a 5 month lead time from beginning of the production process until the ad campaign and even later in the catalogs depending on the last and next catalog print date. The First ads appeared in August 1927. The first unveiling of the pen to the dealers in their "back to school "EVERSALES" dealer newsletter was in June of 1927. Prototyping and beginning production runs would have been late 1926 as an admittedly very earliest outside date of manufacture. SO when "dating" the pen, I allowed for that in the bracketing of the dates I used.. If asked when was my pen sold, it would be 1927. There is a great article in he EVERSALES newsletter citing all the "research" that went into the $5.00 pen as being the dollar amount tipping point above which people would not easily go. They say their research showed that 72% would not pay more than $5 for a good pen. These were not #8 pens and these did not encompass all of the flat top,pre gold seal pen line that were available.

Syd
Syd "the Wahlnut" Saperstein
Pensbury Manor
Vintage Wahl Eversharp Writing Instruments
Pensbury Manor

The WAHL-EVERSHARP Company
www.wahleversharp.com
New WAHL-EVERSHARP fountain and Roller-Ball pens