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Drexel Collection


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11 replies to this topic

#1 antoniosz

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 19:41

Collecting does not have to be expensive. Here is my collection of
Drexel pens. Nice colors, el-cheapo pens from late 30s and 40s (I guess).
Included are also so ephemera. A small piece of FP history.
Any additional info about this company is appreciated.

Posted Image

Edited by antoniosz, 19 April 2007 - 01:39.


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#2 weepstah

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 16:38

Antonios,

Neat pens. I like the decorative capbands. With a name like Drexel, I was thinking it might have been a local brand to the Philly area. How have you found the quality of pens to be? Nibs, plating, etc...

TIA

weepstah
"My shoes were reasonably clean, my rent was paid and I had two boxes of cereal and plenty of coffee at home. The world was mine, and I had plenty of time."

#3 antoniosz

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 01:08

Antonios,
Neat pens. I like the decorative capbands. With a name like Drexel, I was thinking it might have been a local brand to the Philly area. How have you found the quality of pens to be? Nibs, plating, etc...
weepstah


I also was somehow Drexel U. related but it was not :(
I mostly enjoy the pencils and the combos :) With a transplanted nib and feed can become writers :)

The quality is ... el-cheapo. Gold plated, folded tine nibs. The plastics have characteristic defects, for example when the cap is formed from tube the closing of the top is incomplete of with a visible crack etc. :) But the colors are really even nicer than in the picture...

#4 antoniosz

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:03

One more addition to this group of nice 30s(?) plastics.
The green is in reality much better than the picture shows:
Posted Image

Edited by antoniosz, 19 March 2007 - 00:03.


#5 antoniosz

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 08:41

An updated picture of the collection smile.gif






Edited by antoniosz, 09 September 2007 - 08:41.


#6 antoniosz

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 04:20

I know that 99.9% may not be interested in this but I am excited tonight as
I think I found out who was making these pens smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif

Frank Spors, Le Center, Minn (formely known as Le Sueur) smile.gif

I am not 100% sure but it sounds logical. I know that he was doing business till the late 40s maybe even 50s there.
He started as early as 1920s with the "famous" glass nibbed crescent fillers. It appears to me that this was a mail order business.
Anyone know anything more?

Here is also a long shot. Anyone has access to the magazine Coronet v.30 1951 May-Oct.
I am looking for a relevant article around pages 138-140 related to Spors....


#7 philm

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 05:47

Sorry I missed this post originally. I have received your back channel email and am quite certain that Spors did distribute the Drexel brand pens and pencils. I have responded in kind and look forward to additional information you uncover.

Phil

#8 antoniosz

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 04:38

Sans comments for the time being...


















#9 designbydecade

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 10:47

This is fabulous. Thank you for sharing. Plus, your pens are gorgeous.

#10 philm

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 16:43

Antonios,.



Imagine my surprise as I sit in the Detroit airport waiting for a connecting flight and I pull this up. I don't have time to digest this all right now, but at first glance this answers a lot of questions and brings on a few more.

Drexels were distributed by Spors, but so were alot of other pens.

The big Japanese made pens were available at Spors

There were Drexel button fillers?

I wonder if Wahl was the manufacturer of the Drexels?

I need to look closer in MN antique stores for Drexel Ink bottles..

Too much to read but gotta catch a plane.

Thanks for showing pictures of the new catalog. I will try and read it at the hotels or when I get back home this weekend

Phil

#11 dhlr14454

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 20:09

Although I know it isn't a Drexel: there's an ink making pen? That's pretty wild: I wonder how that worked--where did the ink-stick go? What held it in place? Five sticks in a pack, but each stick only good for 2-to-4 uses?

I wonder if there was a market for "instant ink" in general. As I don't know much about it, I guess not.

Anyway, this is a fascinating thread.

#12 Johnny Appleseed

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 20:43

QUOTE(dhlr14454 @ Jun 5 2008, 01:09 PM) View Post
Although I know it isn't a Drexel: there's an ink making pen? That's pretty wild: I wonder how that worked--where did the ink-stick go? What held it in place? Five sticks in a pack, but each stick only good for 2-to-4 uses?

I wonder if there was a market for "instant ink" in general. As I don't know much about it, I guess not.

Anyway, this is a fascinating thread.


That was either a Camel, or a Sager Ink-maker pen.

The Camel:
QUOTE
Camel A pen company founded in 1935 to produce pens that made their own ink when you filled them with water. At the back end of the barrel, built into the button filling mechanism, was a replaceable cartridge that contained an ink pellet. Unlike the ink pellets for trench pens of World War I, the Camel’s pellet was intended to be good for many fillings, up to a year’s worth. The concept was good, but the execution was unsatisfactory, and Camel was out of business by the end of 1938. Shown here is a “junior” sized Camel. See also Instant Ink, trench pen.


From - Richard Binder's Fountain Pen Glossary

There was a market for instant ink, back in that era, particularly for ink pellets. A single pellet could be reconsitituted in a bottle, or dropped into the barrel of an eyedropper-filled pen and then the rest of the barrel filled with water. In WWI a few companies marketed "Trench Pens" that had a built-in container in the back for storing extra ink-pellets - they were marketed to send to the "boys in the trenches" - Parker marketed one heavily (and it seems they marketed more than they made). Other companies, including Swan, made more - Swans can be found sold through mail-order catalogs for a few years after WWI. Ink pellets were around at least through the 30s, I think.

John

Edited by Johnny Appleseed, 05 June 2008 - 20:52.

So if you have a lot of ink,
You should get a Yink, I think.

- Dr Suess

Always looking for pens by Baird-North, Charles Ingersoll, and nibs marked "CHI"






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