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Practicing writing at a slant.


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#1 Pink Ink

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 01:50



Apparently to do Spencerian and Copperplate, I have to get comfy with writing at a slant, something I never do. So I spent today working on my own handwriting and seeing what would happen if I slanted it. Top is how I normally write, bottom is at the end of today's efforts.

Following caliken's advice, I did turn the paper at a slant. It helps somewhat but every now and then I have a brain fart and write perpendicular to the line instead of straight up and down from my point of view. Learning to write at a slant might require multiple mental tricks from me.

Sorry but, writing at a slant just feels so wrong.

ETA: BTW, that's wide-ruled paper I'm writing on. Oh and the text is from a video game, trust me it's more disturbing than romantic.

Edited by Pink Ink, 27 October 2008 - 01:53.

Writing instruments of the moment:
  • Pilot Prera Fountain Pen in Vivid Pink XF (Levenger ink, Pinkly).
  • Uniball α-Gel Slim Pencil in Pink (0.3mm leads).
  • Pilot 742 Fountain Pen in Black with Falcon (flex) Nib, (Pilot ink, Black).
  • Nikko G Nib in the penholder.

#2 Renzhe

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 01:58

Have you tried paper with slant rules? I made something with 55-degree slants here, a .pdf at the bottom of the post. I made that for myself. Your results may vary.
Renzhe
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#3 Ken Fraser

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 13:16

QUOTE (Pink Ink @ Oct 27 2008, 01:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Apparently to do Spencerian and Copperplate, I have to get comfy with writing at a slant, something I never do. So I spent today working on my own handwriting and seeing what would happen if I slanted it. Top is how I normally write, bottom is at the end of today's efforts.

Following caliken's advice, I did turn the paper at a slant. It helps somewhat but every now and then I have a brain fart and write perpendicular to the line instead of straight up and down from my point of view. Learning to write at a slant might require multiple mental tricks from me.

Sorry but, writing at a slant just feels so wrong.

ETA: BTW, that's wide-ruled paper I'm writing on. Oh and the text is from a video game, trust me it's more disturbing than romantic.

I quite like upright handwriting, and yours is attractive as it is IMO.

However, if you want to try Spencerian or Copperplate, steeply sloped lettering is essential or the styles become something else. BTW I think that the sloped letters in your example, are already very good - it just takes time.

To help make the adjustment to sloped writing, you could try the same technique but at a much reduced slope, until you get used to the feeling.
Using this technique, the paper is always turned so that the slant line is pointing straight at you, at right angles to the edge of your desk. This applies whether it's 10 degrees for italic or 55 degrees for copperplate.

Please keep posting!

caliken

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#4 Monsieur Dupont

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 14:45

I was taught upright cursive in England back in the 50's and have many times tried to improve the look by using slant. IMO it does look much better but not all will agree. I wrecked numerous pens writing slanted in school and gave up until just recently re-learnt the art with decent pens/nibs.

The clue to nice writing is not the angle but consistency. I think it is easier to write consistently at a slant than upright..... you only need to slope slightly eaither way a couple of times on a whole sheet of writing and it looks a mess immediately. If you try to slope 55degrees and miss by a couple of degrees it isn't so obvious. Our eye is trained to know perpendicular and NOT perpendicular.

Cheers,
MD

#5 Pink Ink

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 07:16

QUOTE (Renzhe @ Oct 26 2008, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have you tried paper with slant rules? I made something with 55-degree slants here, a .pdf at the bottom of the post. I made that for myself. Your results may vary.


Oooh, thanks. It does help in that I make fewer errors though my brain still does resist. Though with both the slant-ruled paper and tilting the paper, this seems to make my brain give the least resistance.



QUOTE (caliken @ Oct 27 2008, 06:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I quite like upright handwriting, and yours is attractive as it is IMO.

However, if you want to try Spencerian or Copperplate, steeply sloped lettering is essential or the styles become something else. BTW I think that the sloped letters in your example, are already very good - it just takes time.

To help make the adjustment to sloped writing, you could try the same technique but at a much reduced slope, until you get used to the feeling.
Using this technique, the paper is always turned so that the slant line is pointing straight at you, at right angles to the edge of your desk. This applies whether it's 10 degrees for italic or 55 degrees for copperplate.

Please keep posting!

Aw, thanks for the compliments!

Regarding slants, 85 to 80 aren't too much of a problem to me. I think it's around 75 to 70 where my brain starts rebelling noticeably. I'll take your advice to take it easy next time I get a chance to.



QUOTE (Monsieur Dupont @ Oct 27 2008, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was taught upright cursive in England back in the 50's and have many times tried to improve the look by using slant. IMO it does look much better but not all will agree. I wrecked numerous pens writing slanted in school and gave up until just recently re-learnt the art with decent pens/nibs.

The clue to nice writing is not the angle but consistency. I think it is easier to write consistently at a slant than upright..... you only need to slope slightly eaither way a couple of times on a whole sheet of writing and it looks a mess immediately. If you try to slope 55degrees and miss by a couple of degrees it isn't so obvious. Our eye is trained to know perpendicular and NOT perpendicular.

All things in handwriting and typography are subjective. I like small x-heights and tall ascenders and deep descenders and I think these are why Bernhard Modern is one of my fave typefaces and why I gravitate towards Spencerian more than Copperplate. But I know lots of people look at my choices and think, "Wha?..." Slant, too, is like that. Generally, I like my writing to look less "forward" and more "upright" if that makes sense.

Being off by a few degrees when I'm going after that 55-degree slant, I don't notice when I'm writing. However, after I'm done and I'm criticizing my latest practice session, even slight mistakes feel like I'm off 180 degrees. And then it's even more discouraging that not only did my letterforms feel unnatural while writing them but they also look forced. But I think practicing handwriting etudes instead of whole sentences will give me more of the repetition I need to practice problem spots -- both in inconsistent slants and with letters that don't look naturally slanted so next time I'll try that.
Writing instruments of the moment:
  • Pilot Prera Fountain Pen in Vivid Pink XF (Levenger ink, Pinkly).
  • Uniball α-Gel Slim Pencil in Pink (0.3mm leads).
  • Pilot 742 Fountain Pen in Black with Falcon (flex) Nib, (Pilot ink, Black).
  • Nikko G Nib in the penholder.