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Seys Ruling (a.k.a. French Ruling)


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#1 Guest_Denis Richard_*

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Posted 29 December 2004 - 22:52

I have read several enquiries in the past few months about "French ruled" paper, properly called "Seys". I found today a font that mimics it, and shows how useful it is to teach children how to write with even, proportionate letters. It sets guides for each letter, majuscule and minuscule, for where they start, end, connect, etc... There are 3 minor lines between two majors. Not shown with this font are the vertical lines, giving this ruling it's popular name in schools, "grand carreaux", which means "big squares", as opposed to "petits carreaux" (graph paper). A wide left margin is also defined by a red vertical line, and is usually reserved for teacher notes. All lines, other than the margin one, are printed in blue.

For the story, Seys is the name of the bookstore owner who patented this ruling, in the first years of the 20th century. After his patent was granted, he filled a law suit against a rival who was using the same ruling. He lost his claim, as it was demonstarted that it actually existed since 1890, when it was invented by a school inspector. The name of the original inventor was lost, and the name Seys is still attached to this typically French ruling.

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Edited by Denis Richard, 30 December 2004 - 00:30.


#2 celfyddwr

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 00:15

I was one of the people who have asked about French-ruled paper on one of these forums, and this is a very good explanation. It seems like a wonderful concept. But I just have one question, you mentioned the vertical lines (not shown), but what are they for? Are they just guides to help people write the letters perfectly vertical? Or to they have another purpose?

I promise, this will be my last question about the subject. :blush:

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Edited by celfyddwr, 30 December 2004 - 00:16.


#3 Guest_Denis Richard_*

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 00:29

Hi Ted,

Good question. The vertical lines are used as tabulations. This way you have position references to align your paragraphs, items, etc...

Not sure I was clear on this one... after 4pm I tend to completely lose my english :lol:

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#4 celfyddwr

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 00:42

Ah-ha! So they're kind of like tab-stops on a typewriter, or in a word-processing application on a computer - if I understand correctly.

I think that was quite clear. After 4pm I tend to completely lose my mind, so it's all good. :P

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Ted

Edited by celfyddwr, 30 December 2004 - 00:45.


#5 Guest_Denis Richard_*

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 00:52

Exactly Ted ! (for the tab thingy... not your mind :lol:)

#6 Kate Gladstone

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 01:04

For several other useful kinds of ruled paper (the "Stage-Rite" paper series, which I invented), visit
http://www.theraprod...4245/sub-19342/
Ignore the rather pitiful graphics (2005 should bring much larger, clearer ones, and just send the publisher (Karen Conrad) an e-mail ( kcotr@theraproducts.com ) asking for samples of the different kinds of "Stage-Rite" paper - then use the web-page as your price-list.

Some of my early drafts for various "Stage-Rite" designs actually had vertical lines like those in the Seys paper, but the publisher didn't feel a need for them. (She sells the paper mainly to schoolchildren. However, I've done pretty well selling it to adults through my Handwriting Repair booth at the rare fountain-pen show that I manage to attend.)
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#7 Titivillus

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 15:41

For several other useful kinds of ruled paper (the "Stage-Rite" paper series, which I invented), visit
http://www.theraprod...4245/sub-19342/
Ignore the rather pitiful graphics (2005 should bring much larger, clearer ones, and just send the publisher (Karen Conrad) an e-mail ( kcotr@theraproducts.com ) asking for samples of the different kinds of "Stage-Rite" paper - then use the web-page as your price-list.

Some of my early drafts for various "Stage-Rite" designs actually had vertical lines like those in the Seys paper, but the publisher didn't feel a need for them. (She sells the paper mainly to schoolchildren. However, I've done pretty well selling it to adults through my Handwriting Repair booth at the rare fountain-pen show that I manage to attend.)

Those sort of look like the pads that I've seen at Walmart that are staged for different levels of writing.

#8 Guest_Denis Richard_*

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 22:28

I had a question backchannel about the availability of this ruling in the us, and I thought I would post my answer here too :

The seyes font I used for that post is available here :

http://www.fortuneci...232/page01.html

The only source I know, are U.S. retailer of French stationary brands. And actually, th eonly brand I know that is sold here, is Clairefontaine. The list of retailers can be found on the mother company web site :

http://www.exaclair.com/

Pendemonium does carry it (they call it French ruled). Swisher does not have the Seyes ruling from what I know.

#9 georgem

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Posted 18 March 2005 - 00:02

A few months ago, after learning somewhat more about it from one of Denis posts, I started using some Clairefontaine notebooks with the Seyes ruling. I find that it helps me keep my writing within bounds.

After using these notebooks for a while, I thought it would be useful to have a computer template that would print a sheet with this ruling whenever desired for other use.

After a fruitless search for one, I devised one using Microsoft Word, and after the effort, wanted to share it with others. Since the ruling itself appears to be public domain, I did not think there would be a problem in doing so

Here are links to three documents which will produce the Seyes ruling.

http://www.fountainp...mages/seyes.doc

http://www.fountainp...mages/seyes.dot

http://www.fountainp...mages/seyes.pdf

They are all the same document. For those familiar with Microsoft Word, http://www.fountainp...mages/seyes.dot is perhaps the more useful. Save the document to the templates folder used by Microsoft Word.

The File ending in .doc may be more useful for those using programs that can open and read a Microsoft Word document.

Finally, there is a pdf file for those who prefer to compute without Microsoft.

Finally, I would like to thank Denis for his assistance. Since I do not have a document or image server, nor a way to create a pdf file, Denis kindly hosted these files for me and created the pdf file.

Thank you again, Denis.
George

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#10 Kevin in Atlanta

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Posted 18 March 2005 - 04:21

Gentlemen,

I use an outline guides made by the calligrapher Margaret Shepherd. She has a book on calligraphy and I got the outlines there. However, do a google search on her and you will find her website which has the guides there. You can shrink them or whatever. I use them on a light table with other paper as practice. Its really useful for calligraphy and regular italic writing and just general proportion and height keeping.

my .02 worth (with inflation and the price of gas aint worth 2 cents)

Kevin in Atlanta

Edited by Kevin in Atlanta, 18 March 2005 - 04:22.


#11 Anne-Sophie

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 01:08

This topic sent me back to memory lane and I decided to make my own seyes paper using Appleworks drawing program.

I first made a tricolor ruled guideline with vertical lines to practice capital letters.

Then I added more horizontal line to make a true Seyes tricolor guideline.

Then I made a black and white version of the Seyes to guide me when I write on blank paper.

Tricolors guidelines impossible to scan :(

I'll try to scan the Seyes black and white version later.

My version has wider spaces between the lines, regular Seyes lines like the ones in Clairefontaine and all french papers and notebooks have smaller space between horizontal lines.
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#12 KCat

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 14:38

Hi Anne-Sophie!

I don't know anything about Appleworks - can that file be exported to a WinXP format of a related software?

Is this a word processor, desktop publisher, or??? that you used to do this.
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#13 Anne-Sophie

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 17:05

Hi KCat,

The sample was created in the painting program of Appleworks, Apple's answer to Microsoft Works.

I printed the tricolor version blue main horizontal lines/purple secondary horizontal lines /teal vertical lines to make a personalized journal out of my very nice printer paper.

I though I scan the sample to share with fellow Seyes enthusiasts. But the colors did not come out at all, which is weird because the scanner scan pet pictures wonderfully.

I will scan the black and white version which I use as guideline under blank sheets of printer paper.

I took a clue from you and started using printer paper for calligraphy practice.
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#14 Anne-Sophie

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 17:21

I cannot post scans! Where is the browse button? :doh:
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#15 wimg

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 17:31

Hi Anne-Sophie,

Scans you have to post as a picture. IOW, you need a picture host, place it there, and link it here through the IMG button. If you dont have a picture host, send it to me via email, and Ill host it for you and send you the link back, no problem.

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#16 drifting

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 13:32

Hi all. This is only the second time I've used my scanner and the first time I've used Photobucket, so bear with me.

The orginal is a 17x22cm notebook page. (roughly 6 5/8"x8 5/8")

Ryan.

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#17 zxc

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 15:54

Beautiful handwriting Ryan. Thanks for sharing it!

I really hope I can acquire some more of this paper. I had a Rhodia Pad with it on it but I haven't been able to track anymore down in the UK :(.

#18 Sonnet

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 00:39

Resurrecting the thread. I just purchased a french-ruled Clairefontaine notebook from Pendemonium. I'm glad I found this thread because I had been wondering about the origins and purpose of French-ruled lines. Thanks, Denis!
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#19 J. John Harvey

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Posted 05 February 2006 - 22:40

Where in the United States, Minnesota, can one buy Clairefontaine papers? I have looked in Office Max, where I couldn't find it; perhaps it can be found at my Paradise Pen Co. store?

#20 Sonnet

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 15:25

Pendemonium is one of the few, if not the only, US seller offering Clairefontaine French-ruled notebooks in cloth-bound and wire-bound versions.
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#21 Lynn

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 04:57

QUOTE(J. John Harvey @ Feb 5 2006, 04:40 PM) View Post
Where in the United States, Minnesota, can one buy Clairefontaine papers? I have looked in Office Max, where I couldn't find it; perhaps it can be found at my Paradise Pen Co. store?


I know it's over a year since you asked this, but if you still haven't found it, Clairefontaine notebooks and journals are available at Wet Paint, a small, but packed, art supply store in St. Paul. It's on the corner of Grand Ave. and Cambridge St.

www.wetpaintart.com

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#22 succubus

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 16:48

I've found that if your stationer already carries Clairefontaine, you can just request him/her to add whatever products you want to the next order. That's how I got my cloth-bound, French-ruled notebook - by special request. (Since then I've just been ordering from nota-bene.ca. I think I might like the Atoma notebooks better than the Clairefontaine; the ruling is lighter.)

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#23 hardyb

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 18:10

If you want to make your own via your desk top printer, I can download some formats and post here. I have collected (pdf,doc, dot formats).
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#24 Robert Hughes

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 02:36

In Minneapolis, I buy Clairfontaine wire-bound books at Art Materials on Lyndale Avenue. They also have a pretty good fountain pen & ink store there; I bought a Lamy Safari and a Parker Sonnet from them last fall, and go there for the standard inks from the usual players.
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