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How do I take apart this desk pen


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#1 jmkeuning

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 04:31

I know that a pic would help... perhaps you can look at the auction.

Where does this pen come apart? And how? Are the part threaded or friction fit?

There are four pieces of plastic, three not including the tail.

So, there is the barrel, a middle section, and the section that the nib attaches to. The middle section and the piece that the nib is attached to have a piece of metal sticking out the side, so I do not think this is threaded.

Any thoughts?
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#2 CaseyK

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 06:41

The cone holder pulls straight out of the glass base. The taper unscrews as you can see in the picture and the nib section is friction fitted. I am pretty sure there is no separation possible at the gold filled ring in the mid part of the barrel.

#3 Roger W.

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 06:42

You won that? - good on you (I was going to bid but, didn't get 'round to it). Anyway, it is just friction fit. Oh, the desk base - it's an N018 from 1937. The pen, if it is period correct, has a metal staple in the section and barrel as you describe. So you just need to carefully rock it out. The key (what Sheaffer calls it) was used to engage the fluted sleeve which is the "dry-proof" system. The tabs all corrode away typically so the dry-proof will probably not be functional but, the pen should work fine resaced.

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#4 rroossinck

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 13:36

I've got a pen that's almost identical to that one sitting here in my parts bin James, and I'm not planning on doing anything with it. Should you need spare parts, let me know.
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#5 Roger W.

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:45

James;

Here's the article covering these on my website -

sheafferflattops.com

Roger W.

#6 jmkeuning

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 15:47

OK, so to be clear - I need to remove the staple before dismantling the section?

Any hints to this? Can a jeweler's slotted screwdriver be wedged behind it? Or should I try to grab it with some pliers and pull from the top?

BTW Roger, thanks for chiming in on this!
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#7 Roger W.

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 16:20

James,

No, no, no. Staple (key) stays in place. I always rock Sheaffer sections out anyway but, with the key, for a short bit anyway, it has to come straight out. Sheaffer's are very strong and I've broken threads on maybe 3 out of 700-800 pens - use some care (maybe a little heat though, I usually don't - maybe would have saved those 3 even) but they are very resiliant.

Glad to help.

Roger W.

#8 jmkeuning

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 16:42

Sweet! Got it.


I almost gave up, because it would NOT budge.

So, I turned into the Hulk and yanked it out.
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#9 ebrian

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 00:46

QUOTE(jmkeuning @ Dec 30 2007, 10:42 AM) View Post
Sweet! Got it.


I almost gave up, because it would NOT budge.

So, I turned into the Hulk and yanked it out.

I always use some dry heat (hair dryer). Heat the barrel behind the section. Heat will make the barrel expand and loosen the section (and maybe soften any shellac in the junction). A hair dryer is fairly hot (about 150°F) so heat slowly and be patient. Some times you need to heat the barrel to put the section back in if the section is especially tight. Sometimes section pliers are useful to pull on the section. I usually try and use my fingers, though. For really stuck sections, I hold the joint in the ultrasound bath for a few minutes. I've found that Sheaffer overlays with the metal covered sections are especially difficult to remove. I think the metal covering keeps the heat from penetrating into the joint. You obviously can't use too much force with the metal covered section to prevent damage. For what it's worth, early Kraker and Kraker made pens have a keyed section that cannot be turned as with the Sheaffer sections with the key.
Eddie Brian

#10 Roger W.

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 23:44

Eddie;

I thought about pointing out "like Krakers are keyed" but how many people know that? I just got my first Kraker a week ago. It was hidden in another auction so I had a rare opportunity.

Roger W.



#11 ebrian

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 00:59

QUOTE(Roger W. @ Dec 31 2007, 05:44 PM) View Post
Eddie;

I thought about pointing out "like Krakers are keyed" but how many people know that? I just got my first Kraker a week ago. It was hidden in another auction so I had a rare opportunity.

Roger W.

It's fascinating that the amount of machine work required to produce one of the early Kraker pens (usually with shield imprint). Kraker apparently eventually abandoned the complex design - or maybe the later pens were really made by Sheaffer, who knows? The key in the barrel of the early Kraker pens is actually a metal sleeve with a dimple (that forms the key) that's inserted into the end of the barrel - the end of the barrel has a machined recess for the metal sleeve. This also means that the end of the barrel behind the threads is extremely thin - and easy to break. If the sleeve is corroded, it can be almost impossible to remove the section.
Eddie