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The Parker Vector


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#61 ANM

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 20:34

I won it on ebay- buy it now. It came from India. There are 5 left @ http://www.ebay.com/...#ht_1796wt_1398

Edited by ANM, 28 July 2012 - 20:43.

And the end of all our exploring
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And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#62 fiberdrunk

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 21:43

I won it on ebay- buy it now. It came from India. There are 5 left @ http://www.ebay.com/...#ht_1796wt_1398


Thanks!
Find my homemade ink recipes on my Flickr page here.

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#63 Anitropius

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 16:00

I've had two Vectors, but for some reason they've all been taken apart by me. I have fond memories of them as I wrote my fifth journal almost entirely with them, even though that time of my life wasn't... well, that very well. I see the Vector as a memento of me finding myself. I recently looked through my room to find all the parts and restore them, and I managed to restore one them. I wrote with it for a day, then I gave it to a friend when we talked about how she wanted to get into writing.

"This pen is cheap, simple and sleek and I've done a hell of lot of writing with it." I said. "And now, it's yours." She's said that she really enjoys it, so I guess it's true that it's a good entry level pen. I've recently taken a nib and built an unholy Frankenstein-pen composed of the Vector nib, Pilot V5 shell and a Lamy cartridge. It doesn't look good at all, but works just fine.

And that's my story about the Vector, which I obviously like. I also have a Batman Vector ballpoint which I love, got it for about two bucks and it's my back-up pen.

#64 LisaN

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 19:40

I love my two vectors. First, because I can put any ink in them, or neglect them, let them dry out... and they still flush and write. they are not so much in daily rotation, though.

I also love them because of nostalgic reasons.
When I was in grad school, a guy joined my lab who was... hopeless. A big, careless, inconsiderate, stupid galoot, and that was being generous. My project was pretty far along, three years in, and working out well. His, umm, no. He would constantly go on about how smart he was, and how important his non-working project was- as an excuse for why he kept taking my glassware, using up the last of the solvents, etc. When his experiments didn't work out, he would throw mini tantrums, throwing notebooks and pens. He kept saying how he would be done in less than one year.

So I decided to buy a pair of vectors, for red and blue- black ink, and started writing out my dissertation on yellow pads. He'd quit playing some video game, amble over and say, "boy, you are being lazy ... no labwork today?"
It was quite nice to say, "I'm writing my dissertation while today's experiments are running." He would quickly disappear.
So I associate my vectors with the motivation to get done and get out, while simultaneously annoying that jerk.
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#65 pencils+pens

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 20:55

I have three Vectors. The navy blue one was purchased as part of a three piece set in the 1980s. The other writing instruments were a rollerball and a mechanical pencil. That was the first matching set of writing instruments I had owned since grade school. It was also the first fountain pen I had owned and used in many years. It kept my interest in fountain pens alive until that interest bloomed again a few years ago.

The second Vector is black. It is the main piece of a tinned calligraphy set I purchased on eBay a few years ago. I purchased in when my interest in fountain pens and penmanship began. I have since switched from Italic hands to non-Italic hands and put the Vector in semi-retirement. It and the Italics nibs to the Sheaffer Prelude were the only calligraphy components I kept.

The third Vector is white. I purchased it after this year's Miami Pen Show. I bought it to match a white Vector rollerball I picked up at the show for $2.50.

Two of the three Vectors remain in the rotation. I fitted the blue Vector with a converter this morning. When it goes back into the rotation it will be inked with Private Reserve American Blue. The white one is currently inked. The white one is being used to use up my remaining Parker cartridges. Once the cartridges are gone, it will also be given a converter. I have not decided what ink it will carry. Since white is a neutral color I could put any color ink in it.

All of my Vectors have been good writers. I have had no problem with skipping. I can leave them for a long time and they usually start right up. If they don't, a few shakes and a pass on the tongue and they are good to go.

I also like their simple, functional look. What is not to like about an inexpensive, durable, functional pen.

#66 SUNIL GARG

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 03:44

The problem with Parker Vector is not the pen but the quality of ink. In an Indian Summer of
40 degrees plus that lasts for 7+ months the ink has to be tropicalized. I wonder if there was
any available, previously. The best ink made here is Quink, made for Parker by Luxor.That too only recently.
In the 70s,80,90s & early 2000s only Chelpark, Camlin etc. were available in India which despite
having nice colors & flow used to cake & clog even my Mont Blanc 144 and even ate up the so called
'precious resin'.
Then I changed to Sheaffer Skrip,Waterman Encre & MB Inks & the like. Wow!another world experience unfolded.

Presently, I have Inks from cda, PR, Omas,Peli-Edel,Sailor etc. The best bang for money spent I
get is on PR whose inks are saturated & flow nicely in any pen-MB,Sailor,Omas,Waterman,Duofold
& the finicky S.T.Du Pont also. Yes, STDP runs only in Cda Amazon & any of the 6 shades of PR that I
have. Strangely it stops writing in Peli-Edel.Inscrutable world of Inks & the Pens.

Back to Parker- just a few days ago I took out my quarantined Parker Vector, fitted it with a
Parker slider convertor and filled it with Omas Red. No problems, doing what a Vector can be
normally supposed to do on paper.

Few inks, if any, can run well in any fountain pen & one has to match/wed inks with pen.
Lots of trial & error involved here.

#67 robofkent

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 19:51

I bought another Parker Vector the other day. I went into well known UK store WH Smiths and saw they were priced at £10, which for a Vector is a little too expensive, so I went down the road and picked one up in equally well known UK store Wilkinsons, where they were priced at under £6.

Although you can pick them up even cheaper on Amazon and Ebay of course!

#68 inkstainedruth

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 20:24

My Vector is a little workhorse. Completely dependable. No matter what ink is in it, no matter that it sat unused in someone else's house for 2 months (and certainly not kept nib up), and then after that spent a week in the bottom of my husband's car in 20 degree MA weather -- when I got it back, it started right up the next morning without skipping a beat. Or a pen stroke, for that matter....
Would I buy another one? In a heartbeat, if I could find one for under $30 US for a fine nib (for some reason the medium nib ones I"ve seen on Amazon are cheaper). I've even considered buying ESSRI (in spite of the exorbitant overseas shipping costs to the US) and folding a pen order in with it, just to spread the shipping costs out somewhat.
Does it beat out my vintage 45 with the 14 K nib? No. Does it perform better than the Urban that I've had to send back to Parker twice (and for which they just sent me a replacement pen, with a cryptic note that the barrel on the first one was "defective")? Heck, yeah.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth
"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#69 benn093

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:13

My Vector is a little workhorse. Completely dependable. No matter what ink is in it, no matter that it sat unused in someone else's house for 2 months (and certainly not kept nib up), and then after that spent a week in the bottom of my husband's car in 20 degree MA weather -- when I got it back, it started right up the next morning without skipping a beat. Or a pen stroke, for that matter....
Would I buy another one? In a heartbeat, if I could find one for under $30 US for a fine nib (for some reason the medium nib ones I"ve seen on Amazon are cheaper). I've even considered buying ESSRI (in spite of the exorbitant overseas shipping costs to the US) and folding a pen order in with it, just to spread the shipping costs out somewhat.
Does it beat out my vintage 45 with the 14 K nib? No. Does it perform better than the Urban that I've had to send back to Parker twice (and for which they just sent me a replacement pen, with a cryptic note that the barrel on the first one was "defective")? Heck, yeah.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth



Not only are they reliable in the warm, I took one to Alert on Ellesmere Island and it worked quite well, as did the Pilot Varsity I had with me.

I like the "flighter" style best, and only wish two things of this humble yet hardworking design: one, that the fine nib were more easily available; and two, that they came with a convertor (as, once upon a time, did the Frontier).
I've had no luck with the Urban nor with the ghastly IM. Both have nibs made of horseshoe nails and the trim around the end of the section on my Urban rusted. My favourite Parker of today is still the Sonnet but it is a Vector that goes with me into the field or on long trips.

Are the newer ones really made in China? I ask this as the rollerball sold in Staples now is. I bought a fountain pen version, black barrwl and silver crosshatched cap, and it seems to be of, shall we say, a slightly less robust finish?

#70 inkstainedruth

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:00

I like the "flighter" style best, and only wish two things of this humble yet hardworking design: one, that the fine nib were more easily available; and two, that they came with a convertor (as, once upon a time, did the Frontier).
I've had no luck with the Urban nor with the ghastly IM. Both have nibs made of horseshoe nails and the trim around the end of the section on my Urban rusted. My favourite Parker of today is still the Sonnet but it is a Vector that goes with me into the field or on long trips.

Are the newer ones really made in China? I ask this as the rollerball sold in Staples now is. I bought a fountain pen version, black barrwl and silver crosshatched cap, and it seems to be of, shall we say, a slightly less robust finish?
[/quote]

Funny -- my Vector has an F nib. I wasn't sure I'd get used to it at first, since my previous (unknown model) cheapie Parkers from Staples were Ms But I grew to like it, and ironically, the new Urban, with its M nib, writes much drier (although I just read that Sailor inks are fairly dry, so that may be part of the issue, and I've got Sky High in the Urban at the moment). OTOH -- I seem to recall reading that the nibs for Vectors and Urbans are the same.
As for where the Vectors are now made, I couldn't say -- mine is marked as being made in the UK.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth
"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#71 ANM

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:58

Parker slide converter fit Vector pens.
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#72 Boris87

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 13:21

Gosh, the vector was my very first fountain pen at age 7! Not exactly the greatest FP in the world and if honest, as a left-hander, I always found it awful to write with back then (and FP's in general) due to excessive smudging.

Strange then that I love using ink pens today. Anyway, the vector is a scratchy pen, however, for somebody just starting out with FP's, it's an inexpensive way to try them out. Also due to them only being able to take cartridges, it's not possible to use really good ink (that's my love with this hobby):)

#73 ANM

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 15:58

You can use bottle ink. The modern slide converters will fit. I have one in my vector. As for scratchiness, that is not a characteristic of Vectors in general but rather a fault with your particular nib, unless you happen to have an italic nib, then it is probably scratchy for cursive, but a round tip will only be scratchy if misaligned or otherwise damaged.
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#74 inkstainedruth

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 16:12

And you *can* clean out and refill cartridges. Sort of a pain, I've found (I prefer using the converter and bottled ink) but I've done it and you can use whatever ink you want in them if you clean them out well enough.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth
"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#75 Freedomcoach

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 12:44

Hi Everyone:

 

I'm a long standing Parker pen lover and recently got really into the Vectors. I love the simplicity, low cost and the fact that they carry forward that famous parker style and brand into a modern yet inexpensive form. I have a parker vector rollerball with fun geometric design and found a way to adapt a pilot G2 broad black refill into this pen so it writes like a dream and looks so playful and fun. You just have to clip the end of the G2 refill slightly and it works. Since parker doesn't make a broad rollerball refill, I was ecstatic when I discovered this.

 

Now onto the vector fountain pens. I started out recently with a pure white one (seems classic to me) with a medium nib and LOVE it! I started out with Noodlers black which writes very smooth yet was a touch "gray". I'm about to shift this one to Aurora Black which to me is the darkest black I've ever been able to find. Please let me know if you've found a blacker black. I think my white vector will be fabulous with this ink. Also, by refilling a parker cartridge using a syringe, you get a really huge ink supply, way more than the converters.

 

My next item is a black vector calligraphy set i just recently purchased on eBay. These pen sets are readily available and very inexpensive (about $20). They appear to come from India. It came with 3 nibs, all stubs. The only nib which has reasonable ink flow is the middle of the lot which I consider to be a broad, a bit too much for me as an everyday writing tool. The nib i want to get going is the medium but the flow on it is weak and intermittent. I'm stubborn though and determined to get it working. I soaked it a lot but still not much. All suggestions appreciated.

 

I have one more Vector Calligraphic on order, a red one. It is slated for Diamine Red Dragon ink which should be super dramatic and fun. This one comes with two nibs and  hopefully the flow will be okay with them. I want to use the broad one with the Red Dragon so if the medium one writes okay, I'll add it to the black vector with Aurora.

 

Thats my Vector story so far. More to come I'm sure. The analogy of vector being like a modern day Esterbrook is not far off but it would be cool if the nib units were a bit more readily available. 

 

Howard



#76 inkstainedruth

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 17:39

Interesting to see this thread keeps getting resurrected.  Since posting initially, I have gotten a few more Vectors, including a calligraphy set with 4 widths of italic nibs.  The only one I had *any* trouble with was one I got on Ebay over the summer that had (apparently) a DIY stub nib.  Had the wrong (i.e., not Parker converter) and then when I got the correct one at DCSS in August, the thing leaked.  So it got taken back to the table where I got the converter.  And got told I would be given a replacement pen, at no extra charge (only then things fell through the cracks) and that got pushed back -- I will be getting the replacement at some point (including a similar nib), only don't know when....  :( 

One thing to note.  All of the pens were marked as being UK made (even the one that is getting replaced, although I don't know whether the replacement pen will be from the UK or not).  Dunno if that makes a difference.  I've also gotten a FP and BP "set" (only really not so much  :angry:) as a graduation gift for my husband's niece, and a Warner Brothers "Tasmanian Devil" pen (dunno where that was made) for a friend who, well, NEEDED a "Tas" pen -- just because.  And because she and her housemate lost everything -- including all but one of their cats -- in a devastating fire last year (and I didn't know until afterwards that she also collected pens).  Although looking at the pen just now I thought I had remembered also ordering her a converter....  :huh:  Think that pen is also UK made :unsure:, but not seeing a date code -- markings are printed and the "UK" (?) part is printed over a light section of the design so it's kinda illegible -- might say "FR"....  Sigh.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#77 Matlock

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 19:10

All Vectors up to 2010 were made in the UK. They are now made in India and China.



#78 inkstainedruth

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 19:24

All Vectors up to 2010 were made in the UK. They are now made in India and China.

Not all.  Some I've seen on Ebay have been marked as having been made in France.  And older ones were labeled as being US made (most of those have black clips).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#79 Matlock

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 19:56

Not all.  Some I've seen on Ebay have been marked as having been made in France.  And older ones were labeled as being US made (most of those have black clips).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

That is interesting. I know that the RB-1 and FP-1 (the forrunner of the Vector) was produced in Janesville. Early production problems were some of the reasons for Janesville's demise. It is just possible that some were made in France before production moved to the Far East. I wonder if anyone has any pictures?

The RB-1 and FP-1 had a slightly different two piece clip.



#80 Princeps Anglorum

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 20:32

I have 3 Vector FPs (and a couple of rollerballs). I have had them for years; two are from the calligraphy sets. I personally prefer a bulkier pen when writing but like a slimmer pen for annotating, highlighting etc. That's where my Vector comes in. I have always found it to be reliable and a good writer. Cheap and unassuming but does the job. The Jotter FP fills a similar niche for me and again a reliable, vfm budget instrument.