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The Parker Vector


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#31 Apollo

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 23:00

QUOTE(TataiFromIndia @ Jun 16 2008, 01:03 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Shamouti @ Mar 26 2008, 01:32 AM) View Post
.................................................................

In summary, Vectors are utility pens and not for displaying with your Sonnets, Duofolds and the like. I use them mostly for testing new inks and playing darts now. Otherwise it's a personal choice.


Nice review,but *********************.If u use a fountain pen for playing dart,you are certainly one.And how proudly u say that.........



Tatai, insulting members of this board the way you did is a quick way to get yourself banned so I've edited your post. Let this be the last time I have to address it.
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#32 MYU

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 23:14

It's a pretty good pen for the price, IMHO. Yeah, you can have some nib problems depending on random chance and the abuses of the previous owner, but generally they're quite capable. I prefer the thicker and more attractive Lamy Vista... but hey, the Vector is still cheaper and if you lose it you don't end up feeling like you lost a valuable artifact.

My only gripe with the Vector is the calligraphy set. I find the stub nibs a bit unreliable. They skip if you don't repeated prime them. You have to move slowly most of the time. But this pen makes for a very convenient art set. It is small and travels well. Plus, you can use cartridges or converters. The black body with chrome clip and metal bottom section has a nice look to it. The brushed aluminum version is the best looking of the bunch and easy to obtain without much extra cost. Seriously, I see no reason to bash this pen. smile.gif

Edited by MYU, 16 June 2008 - 23:15.

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#33 tbfalsename

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 13:19

My first Parker was a Vector and I now own embarrassed_smile.gif 20..ish Parkers, and that's only because I can't afford to buy more.
However my first fountain pen was a Sheaffer NoNonsense and I only own 6 Sheaffers, so obviously the Vector struck a nerve which the NoNonsense failed to impact.


Mike

Edited by tbfalsename, 18 June 2008 - 13:19.

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#34 Apotheosis

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 15:23

I'm digging up this old post for the fun of it !
My 2 Vectors have been sitting in a drawer for way too long so I thought I'd bring them out for a spin !
I've been fortunate that both writes smooth even after so long. Just too bad it's not used very often though..
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Edited by Apotheosis, 01 May 2010 - 15:23.

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#35 redneckwes

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 16:24

I have an old Vector I got in a lot of pens off e-bay, (mostly for the 60's Jotters) but it seems to work ok, it's not an older "45" by any reach, but it's not unpleasant. I have a couple more that have the cat from the Shrek movie on them, still in the package.

#36 Apotheosis

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 16:31

Agreed.
Expecially for the price - not an unpleasant instrument overall, although some may dispute comfort on account of their huge paws..
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#37 Garageboy

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 03:08

Not a bad pen (I do dislike the Reflex, though) but for the price, I rather have the Pelikano

#38 rochester21

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 02:00

well, it`s an older topic, and some of you already expressed their "hatred" over the humble vector, but let me just say the things that i really appreciate about it. 1. it`s cheap, but not that cheap to write with. maybe for those who never used a fountain pen that didn`t came with a gold nib, this comes as a an overstatement, but the fact is that many kids today learn to write using fountain pens worth 50 euro cents, like the ones produced by schneider and others, which are really horrible. in comparison, the vector appears as a solid performer.
2. because it`s cheap, one doesn`t have to worry about it. when i go to college with my sonnet, i have to be extra-careful not to scratch or drop it- not the case with the vector. i can drop it, walk on it, or even lose it. no big deal, because besides the fact that that it`s really resistant, it`s also very easy to replace.
3. i really like the though nib and overall design of the pen. very easy to write with, very comfortable. functional design and distinct look to it- one cannot mistake it.
to sum up, i would say that the vector is not an exceptional pen(it`s not meant to be). but that doesn`t mean that the person who is using it isn`t :)

Edited by rochester21, 07 August 2010 - 17:54.


#39 Venner

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Posted 07 September 2011 - 01:44

Well, I'm not the first to drag this topic out of the closet and dust it off, but I had to simply chime in about how much I enjoy the Vector.

I've been using one since 1995 or so, and it's been my daily pen for all these years. Great for school notes, business, correspondence, etc.

I really like the slim non-flashy design and long-lasting ink. I've never found it takes a lot to break in, as other have suggested, but perhaps my grip and writing style is just right for this pen. In contrast, I hate the Reflex. I've owned two and thrown them both away in frustration...can't get a good grip, stiff nib, etc.

I purchase a couple of Vectors a year on eBay. Being inexpensive, I don't fret if one gets lost or lent-out and never returned. (Does anyone else ever feel apologetic when a lefty asks you to borrow a pen and all you have is your fountain pen? :-p )

The only quirk I don't like is that I seem to distend the barrel clip easily -- it gets caught on clothing, etc -- and there's no easy way to bend it back flush with the barrel.

I've used other, more expensive sets, but always come back to my Vectors.

(At my desk, I typically write with a dip pen, a nib w/a reservoir, and some Higgins Eternal -- but that's another story.)

#40 Rockyrod

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 17:32

I have a vector too.Is it really a thrash pen?Im thinking to upgrade from vector to higher level pen.Whats your suggestions?Pelikan M200 or maybe cross whats do you think about that?

The M150 or M200 are great pens. I prefer a 400 or better just for size but cost makes the 150 worth while.
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#41 MME

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 19:05

i don,t like vectors because i not really plug them.

#42 MrMGWard

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 19:23

I love my Vector!

Now that I think about it, the Vector is the only non-flex pen in my rotation. It's home is permanently clipped to the back of my pocket soft cover Moleskine, which travels with me literally everywhere I go. I cant remember what the stock nib wrote like to be honest, the day I got it I ground the nib to a slight stub to suit my personal daily writing style. I did get a crack in the barrel once from screwing it a little to tight, but as I initially ordered the pen in a package of three, I just swapped in the barrel from one of my spares.

Its not the fanciest of pens, but I can throw it in every bag, and not worry about it. Something I can't do with my vintage flex's.

:P Swavey
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#43 nxn96

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 16:53

I'm no fan of the Vector fountain pen, but I think one has to respect the pen for what it is:

For Parker, the Vector is the basic "introduction" to fountain pens. It was never intended to be a "fine" writing instrument, but rather a student pen/hobby pen/introduction to the world of fountain pens. If someone finds great joy out of a Vector, great; otherwise, have a good time with it. In my opinion, the Vector must be just "good enough" to encourage further interest in fountain pens, but no less than that. In that realm, I think the Vector works. Personally, I don't expect more from a Vector, am pleasantly surprised when someone else does, and am somewhat perplexed when people gripe about an entry level fountain pen that doesn't perform at the level of a Duofold.

#44 DFerguson

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 13:37

I, too, generally dislike the Vector. However I don't dislike it for the nib. That may be because each time I get a new one I write figures of 8 on 600 grade wet & dry paper for about 10 minutes to grind it to my way of writing. Then I smoothe it off with doing the same on a bit of brown paper. This does wear the nib a lot - but it's not the bit that limits the pen life.

The reason I dislike the Vector is the way the cap clutch ring wears out the platic grip area on the section. There seems to be no way to repair this. A terrible waste of money.

Generally the size & everything else suits me.

Regards

Richard.


nothing really to do with this subject, so i apologise, but i found your tip on writing 8's very useful. i have a vector, my first fountain pen, and it was a bit scartchy, but this has gotten the nib very well suited to my writing style, so thankyou.
after this pen, i bought the parker im series fountain pen with a medium nib, which i personally prefer much more than my vector. i prefer a heavier weighted pen and the fact that the vector is made of light plastic is one reason i dont praticularly like it. but as a first pen it is very good and it does write quite well

#45 grandpasmurf

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 22:30

I'm no fan of the Vector fountain pen, but I think one has to respect the pen for what it is


I've had quite a few vectors myself and the one thing I would say is that no 2 are the same, especially when the Medium standard nib is used, some are scratchy and take time to wear in, others are quite smooth from day 1 and then there are others that don't seem to flow correctly and 'skip'

This is not a problem restricted to vectors, I have a rialto that skips constantly and always has, and a 95 that started life scratchy but now is as smooth as you like.

The vector is a good little pen for what it is, I will never use it in preference to my 95 or arrow, or even my vector xl/profile/whatever else they are known as, and is far from being the worst pen parker made (the parker reflex deserves that honour) but at the end of the day, there are times that the vector will be the pen I use as it suits a task better than others.

I have just managed to get my 12 year old nephew interested in calligraphy and have bought him for Christmas the best pen for the job, a vector calligraphy set, just like the one my parents bought me when I was 12, and I hope that he comes to appreciate it as much as I have over the last 18 years!

#46 fiberdrunk

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 19:02

I truly want to know, why is the Parker Vector liked by so many people? Enlighten me...please!


I find the Vector well-suited for iron gall inks, including my homemade iron gall ink (and I've only found a few fountain pens that can handle my homemade ink without clogging). That's why I like them. It's a good little workhorse pen. It puts down a unique line. I'm also a fan of cheap pens.
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#47 Mike 59

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 00:49

I have a few Vectors, and one from '92 is very smooth indeed. It's a small pen, thin and not long enough to suit me.
I think the main problem with it all stems from the design being that the cap is the same diameter as the body, all smooth and flush when the cap is on. So the aluminium section is much thinner in diameter,
(it has to be, to keep the cap the same outer diameter), and the sharp joint is unfortunately right where my fingers grip.
Some things about it are very good design, i.e. the fit of the cartriges, superb, never leaks, overall looks sleek, modern and the clip works well and can't rotate.
It's a case of appearance over everything else, it looks modern and compact but.......
Saying that I do use mine sometimes, but it really feels like a pen for youngsters to learn with.

Edited by Mike 59, 14 December 2011 - 12:30.


#48 Korybas

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 08:13

Had a Parker Vector Burgundy FP throughout my highschool years and I can attest that it was a reliable writer, especially because it could withstand a more than normal misuse. I don't remember how many times I dropped it, threw it or used it inappropriately - still it wrote as it should. Used Quink ink back then, the pen never skipped...
Still have it today: scratched a lot and battered, it still writes. For an inexpensive pen, it was pretty good in doing what it was made for: write... During my Portsmouth University years I switched to Duofolds (1994 and on) and to tell you the truth I had many more problems with them than with the poor Vector! Especially with Penman Rubis ink, the Duofold skipped and skipped and skipped.... Granted, the Duofold is prettier and balanced... but it wasn't so reliable as the Vector...
Will I use a Vector now? Think not, not since my Parker 51. Still, I cannot but have fond memories of the pen! Even wrote my first poems and love letters with it...
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#49 Gnome DePloom

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 04:46

[quote name='nxn96' timestamp='1319129590' post='2134486']
I'm no fan of the Vector fountain pen, but I think one has to respect the pen for what it is:

For Parker, the Vector is the basic "introduction" to fountain pens.

And this is what hacks me off about Parker. If they intend it to be the intro to fountain pens (and I think that's a pretty good way of looking at the Vector), then they ought to have it available at the retail level.

Somewhere.

When I decided I wanted to get back into doing some journaling, I wNted to go back to my trusty Vector Rollerball, which is what I used for many years, but I could not find it. When I went looking to buy one, I could not find ANYTHING Parker in the city of Tulsa, with the exception of a couple of pink Jotts at Office Depot.

I get that the YP are much more into texting that using a pen. I do get that.

but that won't last, surely. Eventually, they will have to use a pen for some things, even if only signing their name. How does Parker expect to have a future for their FP line, if only people who already know of it know to go look for it.

Their pool of FP users has to be aging out. I don't see what they are doing to attract anyone new. Marketing the Vactor, or doing any marketing at all of their FP line would address that, but they don't seem to be doing that.

I really thought that Parker had perhaps gone out of business, until I realized that those pink Jotters had to be part of the Breast Cancer awareness deal, and that's pretty current. Otherwise, tyeir visibility to someone who does not know of them seems to be set at zero.

But at least they still sell Sharpies. <eg>.

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#50 jisip

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 04:57

I have 2 inked Vectors. One is a '93 Flighter and has a VERY smooth M nib, which I now use exclusively w/ J. Jerbin 1670. Another is a 2010 Vector Premiere, a gift I got a week ago, and had misaligned tines, bad flow, and a mysterious white pattern on the feed. It took 2 days of washing, feed widening, and alignment before I was satisfied with the performance. It still have start up issues now and again. My first fp is a blue 2000 Vector, where the barrel cracked while I was attempting to adjust the nib position. It had a very scratchy nib.

The difference in weight, construction, and overall quality between the 1993 pen and the more recent ones are pretty obvious. The modern ones are lighter, with flimsier barrels, looser caps, and sometimes bad nibs. In terms of design ergonomics, Vectors are not good beginner pens for adults, with the small barrel and no gripping area. The transition from barrel to section is also abrupt, and sometimes scratch my knuckles.


I'm no fan of the Vector fountain pen, but I think one has to respect the pen for what it is:

For Parker, the Vector is the basic "introduction" to fountain pens.

And this is what hacks me off about Parker. If they intend it to be the intro to fountain pens (and I think that's a pretty good way of looking at the Vector), then they ought to have it available at the retail level.


For a beginner pen, I think Parker's offering is the Jotter. I'm not sure if they are still making it but the supply is still pretty good where I am. It's definitely much better than the Vector for beginners. I just inked a Jotter Flighter last night with J. Herbin Eclat de Saphir (hmm, I seem to have a lot of J.H. inks come to think of it) with wonderful results, relatively smooth nib, though the workmanship on the section is rather rough.

In short, I mostly use Vectors for experimentation, or because I have to use a gift. I experiment with the cheaper Pilot 78G nowadays, but the Vector is a good pen for elementary schoolkids, nothing more.

#51 Mike 59

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:27

As mentioned by jisip, the older Vector nibs seemed to be surprisingly good, I have one (code IIA) so 1992, which is very smooth indeed, always has been. Looking at at it under a loupe, the nib looks wide, it writes medium, and if it means anything, there is a white sticker on the top of the cap.
I have a couple of more modern Vectors, but they are not nearly so good.
I believe the modern I.M and Urban fountain pens use the same nib, and I hope they have been improved over my 2011 Vector's nib, as the premium I.M's are on sale at over £30.
Two photo's of my '92 Vector attached, if of interest. It is Made in UK.

Edited by Mike 59, 27 December 2011 - 12:31.


#52 Penpower

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 00:51

I came across this forum whilst searching for a spare fine point nib for my Vector. It's interesting - I have a Rialto, a 45, a Lamy, a Pelikan and a Sheaffer. I keep coming back to the Vector: I guess years of ballpoint writing has ruined my handwriting to the extent that the "better" nibs in those other pens are now too soft and flexible for me.

I don't find the Vector skips or that it is scratchy. I'd prefer it if it was heavier, and it's certainly not a pen for using "capped". Never had any of the problems that have been mentioned and its low cost means it's a great pen for carrying round without worry. It's just a pity that if you have to replace one in the UK you will have to spend time looking for anything other than a medium nib.

Edited by Penpower, 20 March 2012 - 00:51.


#53 Mike 59

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 10:49

Hi penpower, Yes the 'Vector' is a popular enough pen, it's on sale in the Stationer's everywhere I go.
It's a modern looking design, which some like, and it could be said to be a school or student pen.
The main complaints are, it too light, it's too short with no cap fitted, & the sharp edge of the barrel is just where your finger needs to be, and the nib can be good, sometimes not so good.
I own three, and my '92 version writes so smoothly, is a 'wide-ish' medium nib. I have never seen a fine nib for sale, but I don't shop on the 'net, so I can't complain too much.
With the cap posted, I find it not too bad, but that really depends on the writers hand, as the posted cap on any pen does change the weight distribution, sometimes greatly. (e.g. Parker Urban.)
From my experience day to day, I notice I write with a narrow upright style using a ballpoint, but a very different style with fountain pen.
If you follow what Parker make, note that the current range has the 'I.M.' and the 'Urban', (and 'Jotter'), which all use the same nib as in the 'Vector', so it's possible they have improved the quality to the extent that it is considered good enough for the higher quality ranges.
You may know of the 'Frontier' range by Parker, where the fountain pen has been discontinued, which many
see as a surprising decision, as for only a few pounds more, it was/is a very much better design.
Plenty available on the'net though, currently.
But for the money, say £8, for what can be a reliable pen, 'Vector' is probably worth it.

Edited by Mike 59, 20 March 2012 - 11:00.


#54 Bill Wood

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 18:51

Nothing wrong with the Vector. I have one, and have played around with the nib. I've had a couple that are smoother than some higher end $200 pens. All makers have an entry level pen - this is Parkers. Sheaffer has the no nonsense - Pelikan had the GO pen a while back. Lamy have an entry level pen. School kids love em'. What a great way to introduce someone to Fountain pens. I used to hand out GO pens all the time. two thumbs up !

#55 Oregon Duck

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:05

I had the opposite experience from the writer who started this thread. I puchased a Vector 20 years ago as my first fountain pen, loved the way it wrote, and I've been writing with fountain pens ever since. I rarely go back to the Vector (it's a bit thin and lighter than I like), but it showed me what's possible with a fluid ink line.
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#56 robofkent

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 21:58

To me the Vector holds memory of school days in the 80s and 90s when it was the FP of choice in UK schools.

#57 GradesWithFPen

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 03:01

Say what you will about the Vector, but I always kept a couple of the cheap plastics around for when someone wanted to come into my office and "borrow" my pen. (I never let anybody else who has never handled a pen to touch my more expensive ones as they can possibly tear up a nib without even realizing it.)

Well, one of my students "borrowed" one of my Vectors and fell in love with fountain pens. Her father was a doctor in town, and she conned him into buying her a very nice Montblanc. Quite a step up, but it all began with the humble Vector. What a way to get introduced to the joys of fluidity.

By the way, I still have two that I use occasionally. Never had any problems with them even after 20 years.

Stay addicted, Penlovers.

Edited by GradesWithFPen, 14 April 2012 - 03:06.

Stay addicted, Penlovers!

#58 drbalajipsy

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 15:39

The Vector is cheaper and affordable and does a good job for daily use.
It may not be stylish, sophisticated, bejeweled or show-worthy; but it is surely a wonderful work-horse.
In India, there are cheaper pens available (Camlin) for school kids and the Vector may be at a higher rung for use by the bourgeois college student.

What would FPN members suggest for the next level of experience in FP-ing? Waterman Hemisphere??

edit: spelling corrected

Edited by drbalajipsy, 28 July 2012 - 15:40.


#59 ANM

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 19:40

I just got this Vector in the mail. I have never seen one like it before. It even has a gold plated nib. It has a slide converter and so far it writes very nicely. The nib seems to be a fine.

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#60 fiberdrunk

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 19:59

I just got this Vector in the mail. I have never seen one like it before. It even has a gold plated nib. It has a slide converter and so far it writes very nicely. The nib seems to be a fine.

Posted Image


Very nice! Where did you mail order it from, if you don't mind me asking?
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