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#1561 canibanoglu

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Posted Yesterday, 16:42

Alright, this is my third notebook that I bound myself, the first one was kind of a disaster but people around me kept saying that it was a very decent one for a first try. I don't have that one handy right now, so I can't post pictures of that one, maybe later :) It was an A5 sized notebook, cloth covered and it used A4 sized Rhodia DotPad paper. 

 

The second notebook was pretty much the same as the one I'm about to post, it had blue flyleaves and the paper was 100 gsm A3 paper. It used faux leather as the cover material and apart from a couple of snags, I think it was a pretty good one. I gave that one to my girlfriend as a gift. The size of the finished notebook was a little bit smaller than A4, because I had my local stationary trim the edges for me (a couple of millimeters at most) so that it would have straight edges.

 

The third one is another A4 sized notebook, uses the same material as the cover material and I did this with my girlfriend, so it has special value. We sewed the bookblock together and she helped me a lot with covering up the board for the cover. It uses 160 gsm paper and I'm happy with how it turned out. Here are some pictures of the finished notebook:

 

swdjU7s.jpg

 

The board has bent a little bit, in hindsight I should have been a lot more patient with the weights... Oh well, I'm already planning my next one.

 

jrgV9uI.jpg

 

The flyleaves. The I chose red because I wanted the flyleaves to match the sewing thread I used. You can see that I've had trouble placing the bookblock in the cover because the flyleaves have bent a little bit into the crease. And the material I used for the flyleaves wasn't really my first choice. I'm waiting for the next month to place an order for some awesome Conqueror papers for my flyleaves. Along with bookbinder clothes (I'm leaning towards Buckram).

 

Ss3uYBb.jpg

 

Random page from the notebook. I'm happy with how it lays quite flat.

 

3Ufo0ij.jpg

 

The corners were the hardest part for me, they ruined my first notebook and they are extremely hard to cleanly pull off. Maybe that has something to do with the clothes that I'm using, we'll see when I get my hands on some proper bookbinding cloth. 

 

8y1ZZxk.jpg

 

Another corner. Notice that it's different from the other one, I screwed up cutting material from the corners and the previous one is different from the others. This one, I think, looks pretty good.

 

Q7pvfI2.jpg

 

Side view next to a Pelikan M1000. You can see the bent cover and how the problems with the placement of the bookblock in the cover screwed up my flyleaves.

 

 

WCri98I.jpg

 

The thread color (kinda) matches the flyleaves, I really wanted to have that. My girlfriend's notebook uses purple thread and the flyleaves are a close blue color.

 

 

The paper I used is pretty good, absolutely no feathering/ghosting/bleedthrough but then again it is pretty heavy at 160 gsm. The only problem is that with very wet nibs there is some letter border definition loss because the paper can't handle with that much ink. 

 

After doing two A4 sized notebooks, I now understand why TMLee doesn't do notebooks in this size, they are hard to handle! The stitching is pretty easy but aligning the bookblock with the cover and working fast enough to glue every piece is a pain in the neck. 

 

For the foreseeable future, I plan to make open-spine notebooks as I like how they look a lot and case-binding has its own set of problems for me. And I plan to do some embossing/debossing and that would be quite painful with case binding. 

 

TMLee, I have a question for you and if you could answer it I would appreciate it very much. Is there a way for me to use any cloth for binding my notebooks? I've seen some videos that back the cloth with a thin sheet of paper but my first notebook's cloth was quite porous and glue seeped at some places. 

 

I would appreciate any feedback and pointers everyone could give me.



#1562 TMLee

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Posted Today, 03:29

Alright, this is my third notebook that I bound myself, the first one was kind of a disaster but people around me kept saying that it was a very decent one for a first try. I don't have that one handy right now, so I can't post pictures of that one, maybe later :) It was an A5 sized notebook, cloth covered and it used A4 sized Rhodia DotPad paper. 

 

The second notebook was pretty much the same as the one I'm about to post, it had blue flyleaves and the paper was 100 gsm A3 paper. It used faux leather as the cover material and apart from a couple of snags, I think it was a pretty good one. I gave that one to my girlfriend as a gift. The size of the finished notebook was a little bit smaller than A4, because I had my local stationary trim the edges for me (a couple of millimeters at most) so that it would have straight edges.

 

The third one is another A4 sized notebook, uses the same material as the cover material and I did this with my girlfriend, so it has special value. We sewed the bookblock together and she helped me a lot with covering up the board for the cover. It uses 160 gsm paper and I'm happy with how it turned out. Here are some pictures of the finished notebook:


 


 

3Ufo0ij.jpg

 

The corners were the hardest part for me, they ruined my first notebook and they are extremely hard to cleanly pull off. Maybe that has something to do with the clothes that I'm using, we'll see when I get my hands on some proper bookbinding cloth. 

 

 

 

Well done ..

You tried , and that is whats important.

You should be proud of yourself.

It can only get better.

 

 

 

Now is to backtrack and troubleshoot what you were not satisfied with :)

 

What is the covering material?

Its nice.

Looks like Moleskine cover material.

 

 

CORNER FOLD-INs

I am not sure I understand what are the problems you are facing,  regarding the corners.

 

Follow this  video clip  where the lady showed how much to trim off the yellow paper covering.

 

From the little I see in your photo, there is too much material there, you can afford to  trim off more. 

 

Cut straight too :)

 

 

The next thing to watch carefully is the glueing stage when doing corners.

A common mistake is to hurry this stage.

Glue still too wet, so its not sticky enough to hold the folded corners down.

So you keep pressing and kneading and all that and it becomes 'over handled'.

In the end , the corner looks not crisp and well defined.

 

 

Watch your glueing technique , which I will explain next.

 

 

Keep it up :)

 

 

 

 

And yes !

You are correct that I don't do A4 sizes becos its very unwieldy.

 

I also have left doing case-binding becos I cant master that stage of attaching the flyleaves to the covers and bookblock.

Until I find a failsafe technique , I wont revisit making them :)


Edited by TMLee, Today, 06:46.


#1563 TMLee

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Posted Today, 03:34

GLUEING FABRIC TO  GREYBOARDS ...

 

Mentioned here in post #899 ...

 

http://www.fountainp...30#entry2186196

 

 

The concept is this,

 

 to glue the fabric onto the greyboards,

the challenge is to do so without the glue penetrating up thru the fabric and appearing on the finish side.

 

so to do this ,

you need to ensure your glue is not wet enough to do so.

 

there are some ways to achieve this :

1) use a non-liquid glue , like spray adhesive ( eg, 3M brand) (these things are super strong and are permanent. they also create a huge mess on your work area so work away from your worktop. They are also highly flammable and toxic. Very strong and very sticky glue - zero room for error ! )

 

2) turn your fabric into bookcloth , eg use 'Heat n Bond' - you get your homemade bookcloth !

perfect , my only complaint is that it gets thickish !

 

3) use PvA glue , like I do , but just work smart with it. as explained in that post mentioned above. Its liquid glue, but I glue it very dry, ie brush it so until its like painted with glue. the trick is to let it dry till its tacky - not wet - then attach it to the fabric .

 

4) you can even use glue stick - paste glue stick - its a non-liquid glue .

Especially if the area to be glued is small, like when I make co-ordinated hinges - I use a glue stick , it works fine too.

 

 

a note about FABRIC ...

 

many kinds of fabric around.

my best experience is with cotton.

 my worst experience is with polyester. just doesn't stick. This one works best with spray glue. and you will experience a great challenge  when you attempt to fold-in the corners. Very difficult - they just don't stay put.

 

so the same concept applies...

find a glue that is best suited to that fabric.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRY this ...

 

learn to glue-dry fabric on your scraps of discarded greyboards.

 

applying glue is easy.

the catch  is  learning  to apply NOT TOO MUCH glue.

and what to do IF YOU APPLY TOO MUCH glue

 

1) apply glue onto  greyboards ;

 

2) keep brushing around till every corner of the greyboard is 'painted' with glue.

 

2a) if too much glue deposited (like when you see too whitish a certain part on the whole greyboard) , then just keep brushing and spreading the glue around till it gets spread away .

 

( its too much glue if your whole greyboard looks white with glue. This is what we don't want.)

 

( your greyboard should still look grey - except that it looks wet)

 

 

 

Here's the learning part :

 

3) learn how to tell whether its too wet or not.

  look at the freshly glued surface with light  reflecting off from the surface.

If it glistens , its too wet.

You can tell if its too wet , becos you see sharp , well defined reflections.

 

continue watching as it dries out,

the reflection will slowly turn less and less glistening ,

till the reflections looks blurry , THIS IS THE STATE OF DRYNESS YOU WANT.

 

At this stage , it feels tacky when you touch with your fingertips.

 

(when its too wet, it is not tacky, its just wet when you touch with your fingertips )

 

[ 3a) what if some parts are too dry and have totally dried out?

Just pick up your brush and brush the dried parts - your brush is half dry by now and just nice.

Don't reload your brush with glue unless really necessary.

If you reload your brush with glue , you are just bringing a fresh and wet load of glue onto the greyboard and a fresh load of glue will have a different drying time from the rest of the half dry glue on the greyboard.  ]

 

[ 3b) there are some who have tried and reported positive results , like when the greyboard has dried spots unbeknownst to you ,  then you see the flaw later on ( a bubble , ie no contact between fabric and greyboard). someone tried , and I experimented , using a hot iron , and it worked ! The heat melted the dried glue underneath - enough to revive its glueing properties. The bubble disappeared. ]

 

 

 

4) At this stage , just place this greyboard onto your fabric.

 

This concept / technique of glueing applies to all your glueing tasks whenever glueing is required.

For example, when you glue the flyleaves.

Some of you will already have experienced by now , the flyleaves wrinkling and bubbling etc as you glue them.

When you see that , a natural reaction is panic! and understandably so.

 

The reason for the wrinkling  is the same , the glue was too wet.

The wetness gets to the flyleaves (paper)  first, causing the paper to deform / warp / wrinkle...

In cases where its not too bad, you will see the flyleaves return to normal after the wetness has dried out.

sometimes it doesn't recover.

 

 

 

SOME THOUGHTS ...

Consider your work environment too.

I don't work in an air-con environment, but I can imagine it can affect your glue drying times significantly faster.

You just have to factor this in.

 

An aircon environment is so much more comfortable.

You will experience a cleaner , stain free work experience.

 

When there is a fan around, the drying happens faster.

If there is a fan blowing directly, it dries a lot faster. We don't want that too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think I drank too much coffee ! :blush:


Edited by TMLee, Today, 05:49.


#1564 Nonstickron

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Posted Today, 13:20

14766457702_41d1f1ecc9_n.jpg

Untitled by NonstickRon, on Flickr

 

14580375498_2d825a52e8_n.jpg

by NonstickRon, on Flickr

 

14744092396_c22ce9b50c_n.jpg

Untitled by NonstickRon, on Flickr

 

Revisiting the pockets, I've found this method to work, but I'm not happy with the gaps I end up leaving at the end of the pocket. I still can't puzzle out how your pockets fit together at the base. They seem to wrap around underneath, but I can't see how far that goes, or if you maybe overlap your side hinges with the bottom hinge. 


Edited by Nonstickron, Today, 13:21.

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#1565 Nonstickron

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Posted Today, 13:51

Perhaps this is an improvement to what I just posted...but it still would need the have the bottom flap and side flaps overlap on the side glued to the cover.

 

14580587850_5b1a857ba6_n.jpg

Untitled by NonstickRon, on Flickr


Edited by Nonstickron, Today, 13:51.

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#1566 TMLee

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Posted Today, 13:56

POCKETS ..

 

an early design of the pocket described here in post #267

 

http://www.fountainp...e-9#entry954315

 

Pretty much the same in concept today.

 

There are no hinges at the bottom of the pocket...

 

The namecard slot hasn't been invented yet at the time of that post.

 

The 1mm cut off at the sides to accommodate the hinges is also not discovered yet.

 

HTH

 

 

 



#1567 TMLee

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Posted Today, 13:57

Perhaps this is an improvement to what I just posted...but it still would need the have the bottom flap and side flaps overlap on the side glued to the cover.

 

14580587850_5b1a857ba6_n.jpg

Untitled by NonstickRon, on Flickr

 

 

Yes , this is correct.

 

You figured it out :)



#1568 Nonstickron

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Posted Today, 14:30

Thanks   :)

 

I didn't realize it wasn't all one piece in those photos. 


Edited by Nonstickron, Today, 14:54.

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#1569 Nonstickron

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Posted Today, 18:25

I really like those Birch elastics. I don't see anyplace to get them online, their own website requires a login but doesn't have any way to create a login that I can find. Prym seems to go by the name Dritz over here, and there's a huge variety on amazon.com, colors and patterns. 


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