Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

What Is "harmonic Steel"?


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 markh

markh

    Shaded Writing

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 997 posts

Posted 08 July 2014 - 17:33

I've seen several references recently to "harmonic steel nibs."

 

Can anyone tell me what this is, and how it effects pen nibs??

 

thnx,

 

 

.



Sponsored Content

#2 serpent

serpent

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 17:38

kinda sounds like "precious resin" to me.

#3 Ernst Bitterman

Ernst Bitterman

    Nil Magnum Nisi Bonum

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,043 posts
  • Location:The Flat Bit, Canada
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 19:21

They must be kept well clear of all Tesla resonators.

 

No, I don't actually know, but it is probably marketing nonsense.


Ravensmarch Pens & Books
It's mainly pens, just now....

Oh, good heavens. He's got a blog now, too.

 

fpn_1465330536__hwabutton.jpg

 


#4 markh

markh

    Shaded Writing

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 997 posts

Posted 08 July 2014 - 19:44

They must be kept well clear of all Tesla resonators.

 

No, I don't actually know, but it is probably marketing nonsense.

 

A little Google searching convinces this is a real metal quality - something about springs returning to their original shape.

 

http://www.metalwork...-of-innovation/

http://www.pengaller...untain-Pen.html

 

 

Don't know exactly what it is, and how it applies to nibs.

 

 

.



#5 runnjump

runnjump

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts
  • Location:Virginia and North Carolina

Posted 08 July 2014 - 20:36

My guess is that it refers to a "harmonic" microstructure: http://matjournal.or...99&stage=jlist3

 

I have a degree in engineering, but I took only one class in materials. It's possible that the improved mechanical properties could make for a more responsive nib. But it's also possible that the "new and improved" steel has no practical effect.


E quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle.

#6 WateryFlow

WateryFlow

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 21:18

kinda sounds like "precious resin" to me.

LOL I was about to say that it sounds like a term that MB would typically use to artificially inflate their worth


Edited by WateryFlow, 08 July 2014 - 21:20.


#7 serpent

serpent

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 21:28

what improved metal properties? this is ordinary spring steel. It's just another ploy to seperate you from your hard earned money. that israeli grater looks like the precious resin surrounding it returns the metal to its original shape.

#8 82Greg

82Greg

    Most Unexalted

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 374 posts
  • Location:Earth

Posted 08 July 2014 - 21:56

Harmonic usually refers to the frequency components of a time-varying signal, such as a musical note

 

In mechanics and physicssimple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement.

 -- both from Wikipedia

 

As applied to steel (or steel nibs), harmonics was probably developed deep the secret, alcohol-infused environs of some marketing lab.  The physical properties are likely indistinguishable by fountain pen users who lack an endorsement deal with the manufacturer.



#9 rwilsonedn

rwilsonedn

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,802 posts

Posted 08 July 2014 - 22:04

It appears that at least one source of harmonic steel is recycling of the steel wire in used tires.

ron



#10 owend

owend

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 351 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 22:10

Maybe it's dual-purpose and has s secondary use as a tuning-fork?



#11 serpent

serpent

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 22:21

maybe is produced by a company called "Harmonic"

#12 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,286 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 08 July 2014 - 23:34

For those who want a singing nib to go with their French singing straight razor and American singing sword.

Well both the American and French product stop singing the more one waves it around or uses it.

 

Jut what every one needs a guaranteed  singing nib....

You no longer have to put up with manufacturing accidents that has supplied the world before hand..

 

Jimmy Cricket is the best Tunemeister I know. Who's your favorite Tunemeister?


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 08 July 2014 - 23:35.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#13 Hardcase

Hardcase

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Location:Sunny Southern Idaho
  • Flag:

Posted 08 July 2014 - 23:58

"Harmonic steel" refers to the grain alignment in the metal that causes it to maintain its strength when it's elongated.  It's most typically found in the steel belts of tires because the steel is stretched when inflated and obviously needs to be strong to withstand the abuse that a tire takes on the road.  I suppose that it would be a good property for springs.

 

I'm not sure why this is a necessary quality in a fountain pen nib.  While the tines may bend some, they don't elongate.  The skeptic in me would compare this to, say, cryogenically treated audio interconnect cables.

 

Apparently it's also used in the steel recycling process to fine-tune the chemical properties of the finished steel.  The metal from tires has a relatively high carbon content.  Also, I'd guess that since most recycling smelters use induction heating to melt the scrap steel, if you put a big ol' pile of steel wires in with the scrap metal, when that jolt of electricity hits, those harmonic steel wires will act like kindling in a fire.  Again, I don't see what good that is for a fountain pen nib, but there you go.

 

-Drew


Clan-MacNeil-Buaidh-No-Bas-Victory-or-De


#14 richardandtracy

richardandtracy

    Ancient Artifact

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,687 posts
  • Location:Kent, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:45

I claim to be a Mechanical Engineer, and thus far (27 years employment) no-one has come up with enough evidence to dispute that. With my engineering hat on, I'd say it's a load of marketing bull. All 'Harmonic' steels I've come across are fancy grain structure carbon steels. It would be the action of a complete fool to put a rustable carbon steel in a nib.

 

So, either it's saying 'We've got idiots in our Marketing Department' or it's saying 'We've got idiots in our Design Office'.

In either case, the company is shouting loud and clear 'We employ idiots. Buy our pens'. Very clever.

 

Regards,

 

Richard



#15 serpent

serpent

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 July 2014 - 09:38

I claim to be a Mechanical Engineer, and thus far (27 years employment) no-one has come up with enough evidence to dispute that. With my engineering hat on, I'd say it's a load of marketing bull. All 'Harmonic' steels I've come across are fancy grain structure carbon steels. It would be the action of a complete fool to put a rustable carbon steel in a nib.

 

So, either it's saying 'We've got idiots in our Marketing Department' or it's saying 'We've got idiots in our Design Office'.

In either case, the company is shouting loud and clear 'We employ idiots. Buy our pens'. Very clever.

 

Regards,

 

Richard

the design and marketing depts of these companies are genius. i bet the buying public falls for this (bleep).



#16 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,753 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:55

I would presume this Harmonic steel is the Delta Fusion nib?... ohh a load of bullcrap I tell ye...



#17 Namo

Namo

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,416 posts

Posted 09 July 2014 - 14:18

Seems this was used with the new Marlen Aleph. I don't know to what point it's a marketing thing, but it seems that 1) it had some shape memory; 2) it's very, very hard. Concerning the Marlen Aleph, all I can say is that the steel nib is outstanding!

amonjak.com

cropped-amonjak-partie-4-de-4_page_4-modifiee1.jpg  

free 70 pages graphic novel. Enjoy!


#18 OLD TIMER

OLD TIMER

    Rare

  • Away
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:05

They must be kept well clear of all Tesla resonators.
 
No, I don't actually know, but it is probably marketing nonsense.

You are wise beyond your years

#19 OLD TIMER

OLD TIMER

    Rare

  • Away
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:11

A little Google searching convinces this is a real metal quality - something about springs returning to their original shape.
 
http://www.metalwork...-of-innovation/
http://www.pengallery.com/products/Marlen Aleph-Fountain-Pen.html
 
 
Don't know exactly what it is, and how it applies to nibs.
If you found it on google, it must be true.
 
 
.



#20 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,286 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 10 July 2014 - 10:41

Forging I could understand, back in the old days '20-30's...a very good blacksmith could forge & file a crankshaft that would be better than factory ground.

A properly forged knife, has the grains aligned to give a better blade.

Once dip pen nibs were forged. Not just stamped.

 

1900 US company Morton forged nibs, April 1914 Kaweco which had before always used the worlds best nibs, the Morton nibs, made a deal with Morton, to buy the machines, import the workers and families to Heidelberg Germany to make and train the workers for making Morton type nibs for Kaweco. Then came August, and the US families went home.

 

Up to 1930 Kaweco use to hand hammer on tiny anvils and anneal the gold nibs. To keep the iridium from burning off, the tip was stuck in a potato. (Lots of potato soup in the canteen) From 1914 to 1930 when because of other problems Kaweco went bankrupt, Kaweco made the best nibs in Germany and the world out side of Morton....if Morton was still in the business.

Then the new owner cut costs...and the Kaweco nib fell to the same level as a Soennecken or MB.....second class.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 







Sponsored Content




|