Jump to content


Photo

Help With Id: Is This A Wearever?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 EclecticCollector

EclecticCollector

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 13 June 2014 - 21:06

I picked up this lever-filler at a recent estate sale. The barrel and cap end-caps are missing as well as the clip, and there are no identifying marks anywhere. The nib says "silver palladium alloy USA". Based on photos I've found online I believe this to be a vintage Wearever, but would appreciate confirmation from more knowledgeable sources as well as which model it is. The tines are slightly bent but look fixable. Is it worth restoring for service as a daily writer? Much thanks!

IMAG1022_fix_sm.jpg

IMAG1023_fix_sm.jpg

IMAG1028_fix_sm.jpg

IMAG1024_fix_sm.jpg

IMAG1025_fix_sm.jpg



#2 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,424 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 14 June 2014 - 00:21

Unlikely a Wearever and more likely a NoNami.  The cap and body appear to be crystallized.  It's a good learner pen for you to play with repairing.


How pierceful grows the hazy yon! How myrtle petaled thou! For spring hath sprung the cyclotron - How high browse thou, brown cow? -- Churchy LaFemme, 1950

Anyone so limited that they can only spell a word one way suffers a severe handicap. -- jar

The last pen I bought will be the next to last pen I ever buy! --jar


#3 EclecticCollector

EclecticCollector

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 14 June 2014 - 00:43

Unlikely a Wearever and more likely a NoNami.  The cap and body appear to be crystallized.  It's a good learner pen for you to play with repairing.


Sorry if I'm missing the joke... is that an actual brand or just slang for "no name"? In terms of the cap and body what material do you think it is - celluloid? Bakelite? Random acrylic? Thanks for your input.

#4 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    Generally, sleepy.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,935 posts

Posted 14 June 2014 - 00:59

Jar uses a generic term for, yes, a no name pen. Probably similar to a Wearever, It might be good for practicing polishing a pen body, but doubtful it would be worth tracking down the other parts. If you bought a donor pen, it would probably more fruitful to just fix *that* one up, and Wearevers (and similar pens) are plentiful and cheap on eBay for these kind of projects. I've been doing a bunch of these the last few months specifically to hook other people on fountain pens (vintage, even).

 

Best of luck!


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#5 Happy Harry

Happy Harry

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 695 posts

Posted 14 June 2014 - 04:55

It is indeed a Wearever, the nib ,feed and section put this beyond doubt. The Wearever name was on the missing clip, they used some nice plastics.



#6 EclecticCollector

EclecticCollector

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 14 June 2014 - 05:47

If you bought a donor pen, it would probably more fruitful to just fix *that* one up, and Wearevers (and similar pens) are plentiful and cheap on eBay for these kind of projects.

Yes I noticed the same thing, I think I'm just going to use it as a practice pen like jar suggested. :)

 

It is indeed a Wearever, the nib ,feed and section put this beyond doubt. The Wearever name was on the missing clip, they used some nice plastics.

This is why I thought it was a Wearever also, and the sizes/shapes of the missing end caps exactly match many of the Wearevers I found on eBay. The nice deep ruby of the striped/marbled plastic is what made me pick it up. Thanks!



#7 Estott

Estott

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Location:Albany NY
  • Flag:

Posted 27 June 2014 - 22:40

A lot of the low end pens use very attractive plastics. Here is a group of makes such as Townson, RiteRite, Arnold and Congress. 

Attached Images

  • DSCN0171.JPG


#8 ehemem

ehemem

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 27 June 2014 - 23:51

A lot of the low end pens use very attractive plastics. Here is a group of makes such as Townson, RiteRite, Arnold and Congress. 

 

Those plastics sure look like celluloid to me...



#9 Estott

Estott

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Location:Albany NY
  • Flag:

Posted 28 June 2014 - 01:03

And you're probably right- but celluloid is classified as a thermoplastic. 



#10 EclecticCollector

EclecticCollector

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 28 June 2014 - 01:44

 

Those plastics sure look like celluloid to me...

Could always put them to a flame and find out. :lol:



#11 ehemem

ehemem

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 28 June 2014 - 07:42

Could always put them to a flame and find out. :lol:

 yeh, flame testing is SO MUCH FUN!