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Too Much Ink In My Pink #5

waterman #5 pink

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#1 mm1624124

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 14:14

I have a vintage Waterman #5 pink that is just too wet for me.  The adjustment seems to be intended to really put a lot of ink out to keep up with any maximum flexing done with the nib, but it is excessive when writing normally or with just a tad of flex. As a result, what "should be" a fine line width is much broader and wetter and there is very little difference in the line width if writing normally but adding a bit of pressure for expression. Can the feed be adjusted to decrease the amount of ink? I'm not an aficionado of pen adjustments or repairs (don't want to be either), so it would probably be sent to a pro for nib adjustments. Recommendations? I'd like the use the pen more frequently, but I don't enjoy the gushing ink experience.

#2 Uncle Red

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 15:53

Have you tried a really dry ink? That would be my first attempt to solve the issue. A repair man can adjust the nib and feed to reduce flow a bit. Can you take the pen to a pen show?
These pens tend to be wet, especially the really flexible one. My 52 and 5 Brown are both very wet, they need to be to keep up with the full flex. You may want to look for something with less flex that writes a bit drier for everyday, like one of my 55's.

#3 Sinistral1

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 16:00

First, let me say that I am GREEN with envy over your PINK #5!

But, I digress... Have you tried using "dry" inks, like most of the iron galls tend to be? You are asking a Thoroughbred to pull a pony cart, you know!

Edited to add: Willing to helpfully take your too wet pen off your hands for a minimal fee.

Edited by Sinistral1, 13 April 2014 - 16:05.

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#4 Vintagepens

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 01:01

It is usually not a feed issue, but rather that the tines are not set tightly enough. Your nib might be slightly sprung -- is there a visible gap between the tines at the tip?



#5 mm1624124

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 21:19

Have you tried a really dry ink? That would be my first attempt to solve the issue. A repair man can adjust the nib and feed to reduce flow a bit. Can you take the pen to a pen show?
These pens tend to be wet, especially the really flexible one. My 52 and 5 Brown are both very wet, they need to be to keep up with the full flex. You may want to look for something with less flex that writes a bit drier for everyday, like one of my 55's.

 

Hmm, no I haven't tried any really dry inks yet.  Were these pens originally designed to write only full flex?  I'm not a calligrapher by any stretch of the imagination.  I've found the vintage nibs that are very flexible give a really nice performance just for normal writing and will impart some "character" to the lettering.  Actually, I've got a couple that are equal to the pink's flex but aren't nearly as wet and are fun to write with.   I've got some drier inks, so will give it a try.  Never been to or heard of pen shows until joining FPN.  I'll have to see what is scheduled within reasonable distance and give that some thought.  Thanks for the suggestion.

 

First, let me say that I am GREEN with envy over your PINK #5!

But, I digress... Have you tried using "dry" inks, like most of the iron galls tend to be? You are asking a Thoroughbred to pull a pony cart, you know!

Edited to add: Willing to helpfully take your too wet pen off your hands for a minimal fee.

 

I've got some of pharmacist's iron galls that I can try.  A great excuse to play with those inks. :wub:

 

Well, honestly I heard so much about the nib, I had to snap one up when it came available.  I love vintage pens, especially Waterman nibs, so it was just asking too much to ignore!  And truthfully, after trying it out, I'm not all that in love with its performance.  I tend to ink up others before this one, so it remains in storage more than most.  While I also consider the pen an investment, that is not its primary role.  I'd like to get the ink flow to conform more to my tastes.  From my pragmatic view of the world, I think something should be used as it was intended.  For a "fine" flexible, it writes like a very, very wet medium with very little difference in the line width unless I use quite a bit of pressure to flex the tines.  I have noticed that as the ink sac begins to need refilling, it writes like I prefer with less flow.

 

It is usually not a feed issue, but rather that the tines are not set tightly enough. Your nib might be slightly sprung -- is there a visible gap between the tines at the tip?

 

Good question, but I am very lucky to have a pen body and nib that is in excellent, original condition.  The tines are properly, evenly aligned.  Previous owners were obviously very respectful; and I've got a light hand hence why I prefer fountain pens over ball points.  This will not be the pen I learn any lettering with for sure until I get proficient.

 

Thanks for everyone's responses and suggestions.  It does sound like I'll need to have a face-to-face consultation with an expert at a pen show and then decide how to proceed.  In the meantime when I have time, I'll try some drier inks and will report back.



#6 Sinistral1

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 21:26

Can you post a photo of your writing with this pen as well as show us the underside of the nib so we can see how the nib and feed relate to each other?
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#7 Mauricio

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 13:24

There are two probable causes here:

(1) Improper pen/nib setup by the last person who serviced that pen. This is the most likely culprit of the problem. Most folks repairing pens do not know how to properly write with flex nibs. As such, do not expect a great or a perfect setup with such an exotic flex nib if that repair person cannot feel the nuances of that flex nib. Then, there are the amateur folks fiddling with pens and who know very little in terms of pen/nib adjustments in that pen.

(2) Your pen might have incorrect parts or might have slight wear or warping in the section and/or feed. Also, do not be surprised if someone has widened the ink channels in the feed or done some other sorts of "plastic surgery" procedures to parts in that pen/nib, which is also done by amateur folks fiddling with pens and who do not know of advanced flex nib setups in a pen body. Instead, they resort to very unconventional approaches, many times inflicting irreversible damage to pen parts and flex nibs. Just recently I repaired a gorgeous solid gold Waterman 552 pen. The customer sent it to me indicating excessively wet ink flow and some sporadic leaking problems. I found a very thick coat of shellac in between the nib and the feed, combined with the incorrect section and feed for that pen model. I see this quite a bit in pens customers send me for repair.

Edited by Mauricio, 20 April 2014 - 17:26.

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#8 tmenyc

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 14:15

My #5 Brown is also quite wet, but works perfectly with Pelikan 4001 inks.  Needed that touch of dryness...

 

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#9 mm1624124

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 19:06

There are two probable causes here:

(1) Improper pen/nib setup by the last person who serviced that pen. This is the most likely culprit of the problem. Most folks repairing pens do not know how to properly write with flex nibs. As such, do not expect a great or a perfect setup with such an exotic flex nib if that repair person cannot feel the nuances of that flex nib. Then, there are the amateur folks fiddling with pens and who know very little in terms of pen/nib adjustments in that pen.

(2) Your pen might have incorrect parts or might have slight wear or warping in the section and/or feed. Also, do not be surprised if someone has widened the ink channels in the feed or done some other sorts of "plastic surgery" procedures to parts in that pen/nib, which is also done by amateur folks fiddling with pens and who do not know of advanced flex nib setups in a pen body. Instead, they resort to very unconventional approaches, many times inflicting irreversible damage to pen parts and flex nibs. Just recently I repaired a gorgeous solid gold Waterman 552 pen. The customer sent it to me indicating excessively wet ink flow and some sporadic leaking problems. I found a very thick coat of shellac in between the nib and the feed, combined with the incorrect section and feed for that pen model. I see this quite a bit in pens customers send me for repair.

 

I am suspecting (1) to be the real issue.  Since I may be expecting the pen to perform outside its normal ink flow range, I think the best approach is to attend a pen show where there are some experienced, reputable professionals to look at it and how I write for best advice.   Except for this one issue, the pen and nib are maintenance free.  I'll also take everyone's advice and try some inks that are less free flowing and will report back.  This may take a few weeks. :blush:







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