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#1 dragondazd

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 05:30

20130912_215603 (1).jpg

 

The topic is a little overwhelming and while some things are going to apply to me like everyone else, others aren't. For instance, there's a lot of handwriting styles I can't even read: too much slant, flourish, or overlap, etc.



#2 smk

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 05:57

Dazey - I can read your note clearly. Your handwriting is better than many I have seen.

 

You write closest to the Italic style of writing and I think you'll enjoy learning that style. You already own and enjoy a broad edged nib so at least the initial challenge of learning how to use one is out of the way.

 

If you choose to go this route I think it would be best to start learning the formal letter forms. You won't write like that but it will give you a sound foundation in the essence of the style. Look at Ann's instructions pinned at the top of this forum (here). Start with the 'n' and 'o' followed by 'm' (you can make the m based on the instructions for 'n'). 

 

What you want to achieve is:

1. Uniform slant

2. Uniform shapes (for this lesson the distance between the valleys and the hills of n and m should be the same as the width of the 'o')

3. Uniform size 

 

You can use your italic pen (with the nib held at 45 degrees so your horizontal and vertical strokes are the same thickness) or a regular round nib - or even a pencil if that gives you better results.

 

If you would like, you can post your best examples of the words 'on', 'no', 'moon' and 'noon' here for feedback.

 

Salman


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#3 dragondazd

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 06:41

oh wow, what great detail! I definitely appreciate the step-by-step. Thanks, I got a lot of ink samples to use up.



#4 Randal6393

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 17:00

Great advice, Salman. Love your caring attitude, really shows through.

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#5 smk

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 03:35

Dazey - I will be looking forward to the exercises. Take your time, there is no hurry.

 

Randal - thank you for your comment. It is much appreciated.

 

Salman 


I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

 

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#6 dragondazd

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 04:55

I'm working on it! Finding it difficult to match the o angle with any consistency. Got lots of ink to go through



#7 smk

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 06:11

The 'o' does take some getting used to. Try drawing a little oval representing the negative space inside the o with pencil - now form your strokes around this space and you'll begin to see that is is not the ink lines but the inner trapped shape that makes an 'o' good or bad. It will get more interesting as you go along.

 

Also, don't write a zillion o's in one go. Write a few (4 or 5) and then look for the best one. Then try to replicate it another 4-5 times - repeat. This engages your brain fully in the process. Keep it fun. Stop if it becomes a drag, even if it has been only a few minutes.

 

Our fingers already know how to form the strokes - it is our brains that we are training. Keeping it engaged speeds up the learning process and keeps boredom at bay.

 

I hope you are enjoying the process.

 

S.


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#8 dragondazd

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:25

ehehehe, proof, if nothing else, that I'm having fun

 

20130914_004600.jpg

 

I've identified one of the pen/ink combos for my project: Jia Lin

Franklin-Christof 29 Bellus Medium Stub

Scribal Workshop Zhulong on Rhodia

 



#9 smk

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 18:12

It does show your enjoyment - and an improvement in flow. Feel free to close your eyes, envision a perfectly written 'moon' and then let your hand draw the letters on the paper with your eyes still closed. It feels a bit strange but you'll be surprised at the results.

 

S.


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#10 N2theBreach

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 21:33

I'm impressed. Your writing was very legible before, far, far from atrocious. Now, it"s attractive.

BTW, cleanse your mind of what people told you as a child.
That was then. This is now.

#11 dragondazd

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 06:47

Thanks so much for the help guys.

 

Ok, I'm going to be working on this in the upcoming weeks, but thinking ahead...

 

For my Art of War project, I'd like to have 2-3 other forms of writing to choose from. What would you recommend? I want to have some lined up to work on if I have time. We're going for simple and legible but distinct from each other.

 

20130914_230936.jpg

 



#12 smk

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 08:22

How about using the same style but writing the main text with an italic nib using a dark ink (dark blue or black) and adding the commentary in lighter colored ink using monoline (or smaller sized italic) nibs. 

 

This would let you concentrate on the penmanship aspect and provide enough separation in style without being jarring. 

 

I suggest planning and writing a page in different styles. It is fun and lets you experiment before you commit to a style. Page layout is also very important. I highly recommend watching the episodes on Page layout by Llyod Reynolds (starts in the middle of Episode 17). BTW you may want to watch all of them for some great instruction in Italic lettering (why didn't I think of that before?)

 

Salman


I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

 

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#13 dragondazd

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 15:50

hmm good point. I was going to use a lot of colors so I suppose adding more fonts would just make it even harder. I guess I was thinking I might reduce the colors if I repeated some with a different style, but maybe that's just worse.

 

I have:

Main text (black 1.3mm italic)

11 commentators (various colors, various pens)

 

my comments (pink)

husband's comments

 

and possibly comments from two other translations (was thinking having that in two different shades of grey)



#14 smk

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 19:18

That is a lot of detail for each part, you'll need to think through the page layout very well to keep the main text from getting overwhelmed by the commentary. A landscape layout with the main text at the top and the commentary laid out below might do the trick but that assumes that everything will fit on one page.

 

An alternative can be to think of the open book as a unit i.e. the two pages of an open book form one unit (from Reynold's videos). One page can have the main text and the commentary can go over to the next.

 

I agree - different colors and different hands will give the page a chaotic appearance. Do a page both ways and see how it looks to you. 

 

How is the practice coming along?

 

Salman


I have an opinion and I'm not afraid to use it.

 

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#15 dragondazd

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 19:33

Ohh that's a nice idea. Could have the main text on the lined right side (leuchtthurm master) and all the commentary on the left. I could then have arrows pointing to specific parts as needed.

 

I'm really enjoying the practice. I've been sampling ink in my pens to get the right combination of color/pen/nib so there's a lot of ink to work with. I see I need to work on hitting the same heights more consistently.