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Waterman Hemisphere


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16 replies to this topic

#1 AuthorofDarkness

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 00:34

Pen: Hemisphere
Make: Waterman
Cost: $50
Nib: Fine

Packaging & Accessories: (8/10)
The pen came in a a very nice square box that looked very regal. There is a small space between where the pen sits and the bottom of the box and there was a cartridge but no converter.

Appearance & Design (8/10)
The pen looks very cool I love the metal brushed finish on it. I do wish the grip wasn't plastic and the nib seems a bit large but other than that I love the design of this pen.

Construction & Quality (9/10)
The pen is very well made and you can tell. The cap clicks on well and it posts securely. The grip is comfortable and I haven't noticed any fatigue after use which is a big plus. The craftsmanship is obvious it is a high quality instrument in my opinion.

Weight & Dimensions: (8/10)
The pen is actually lighter than I thought it would be. I like a heavier pen so it's not as heavy as I'd like. It is very well balanced and the grip section is the perfect length for comfortable writing.

Nib & Performance: (10/10)
The nib is very nice on this pen. But it was my first pen with a fine nib, so it was a new experience for me... I do like the finer line but it did take some time getting used to especially since Parkers tend to write a bit wider than a lot of medium points. But despite this, I really do like the nib. It always starts right away and have had no issues with dry out.

Filling System & Maintenance: (10/10)
Pen can use cartridges or converter, can't really ask more than that out of a pen....

Cost & Value: (8/10)
I personally thought this pen was a bit expensive. That may just be my opinion. But I think the steel Parker Frontier is comparable in quality, (at least in my experience). So to me the pen was a bit pricey, but I am very glad I got it.

Conclusion: (61/70 – 87%)
All in all a great pen, no real complaints at all. Glad I got it, and would buy it again if I lost it.

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#2 OTDoc

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:50

Nice review. Thanks for sharing. :thumbup:
Long live the Empire!

#3 Craig9802

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:13

I bought my Hemisphere in about 1997, and I've enjoyed it regularly since.  Although I haven't tried out a newer version, the only issues I've had with it were with stretching out of the clip (dang!) and the cap refusing to stay posted securely.  I've since learned not to post the cap.  The nib and ink flow have been faultless.  Based on my recent shopping, I have to believe the Hemisphere is worth much more than I paid back then ($60), as the nib alone is far better than any pen of lesser value I've tried since.

 

Unfortunate that yours didn't arrive with a converter.  I used cartridges for a year or two, but have really enjoyed the flexibility of the converter for many years since.  At least a converter should be easy to track down.

 

Enjoy your new pen!  I really like that color.



#4 mohan

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:51

Thanks for the review. Hemishere is "the pen "for me and have accumulated nine pens in different finishes over last 6 years. it is not at all overpriced even after recent price hike. ( probably I am biased also)

#5 Rebel

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 16:48

I've got two different Waterman Hemisphere fountain pens. The first one I bought, was the "Deluxe" with a medium nib. I liked it so much that when I decided I wanted another pen with a fine nib, I got the plain Hemisphere. The only difference is the Deluxe has a chrome-plated cap.

 

 

 

                                Hemisphere Deluxe                                                                                         Hemisphere Standard     

 

$(KGrHqJ,!lgE1FzJt8)rBNgSpp(Dd!~~_35.JPG                            230689031.jpg

 

 

IMHO, the Waterman Hemisphere just might be the best $95 - $110 fountain pen value on the market.

 

 



#6 Sasha Royale

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 17:39

Many, many, many years ago, I bought my mother-in-law a Waterman Hemisphere.  It was a year

when $39.95 was a heavy price for a fountain pen. 

 

Mom passed-on last month.  Her son went through her Spartan possessions, and sent us a few things.

The presence of her Waterman was clear in letters and many volumes of her journals.  Oh, yeah ! 

I got the Waterman back, and it has a honored spot with other heirloom pens.

 

$39.95 wasn't such a heavy price, after all.  


Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn. 
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen: 
Verweile doch, du bist so schön ! 


#7 Rebel

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 17:47

Many, many, many years ago, I bought my mother-in-law a Waterman Hemisphere.  It was a year

when $39.95 was a heavy price for a fountain pen. 

 

Mom passed-on last month.  Her son went through her Spartan possessions, and sent us a few things.

The presence of her Waterman was clear in letters and many volumes of her journals.  Oh, yeah ! 

I got the Waterman back, and it has a honored spot with other heirloom pens.

 

$39.95 wasn't such a heavy price, after all.  

And now it is absolutely priceless. My condolences on your Mom's passing.



#8 Waine Smith

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 19:31

I recently purchased the Waterman Hemisphere white fountain pen.  The price was a little hefty R1600, that is a about $160.  However, I could not resist such a beautiful white fountain pen.  Initially I found that, loaded with the ink cartridge that was in the box, the ink flow was very wet with the medium nib.  The nib was also overly smooth -- the proverbial: "baby bottom smoothness".  I had a sudden pang of buyer’s remorse.  Then, after spending days learning on YouTube about the various nib tweaking methods, I decided to amend the nib.  I folded the tines, Leg-cross-over style to narrow the gaps between the tines.  After making the tines too tight, it hardly wrote at all.  I panicked at first but persevered.  I ran an extremely fine razor blade in between the tines a few times.  Then I made sure the tines were perfectly aligned, with the thumbnail trick.  Eventually, the nib was bent into a nice shape, so I filled it with Sheaffer skript blue ink.  Suddenly it wrote near perfect.  I found the Sheaffer ink on the "dry" side, which I enjoyed.  However, when I changed the ink back to Waterman Florida blue, the pen wrote "wetter".  I learned that even in a good quality fountain pen, without doubt: different inks with different thickness nibs produce different writing results.

 

In conclusion, it is a stunning looking pen.  I am really happy with it and as a fountain pen enthusiast, I do recommend owning at least one Waterman Hemisphere in whatever finish you desire.  A lot will depend on whether you get a fine or a medium nib, and how you tweak the nib, as mine certainly required some attention.

 

The pen is light enough to be a perfect top pocket pen for work and the clip holds the pen firmly in the pocket.



#9 GreyPix

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 18:26

My wife purchased one for her God son as a birthday present.

They are very nice and very reliable pens.

Always had a soft spot for Waterman fountain pens.

My wife has a Carene. A really lovely shaped pen.

#10 Cushy Butterfield

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 22:00

I have 2 Hemispheres, one in black lacquer the other full metal deluxe, both with broad nibs. Love them!



#11 deepak23

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 06:04

Somehow the Hemisphere never appealed to me and sits unused since 3-4 years. The Expert OTOH is a favourite.

A lifelong FP user...


#12 om_nom_nomigon

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 07:10

I bought one of these to ink up with a sensible colour for my exams. I never got on with the nib though finding it to be a very dry writer which frequently skipped. I tried playing about with the nib which did improve things, but basically I haven't used the pen in about 18 months. After reading this thread though I might give the nib tuning another go perhaps...

#13 Manalto

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 07:37

 Initially I found that, loaded with the ink cartridge that was in the box, the ink flow was very wet with the medium nib.  The nib was also overly smooth -- the proverbial: "baby bottom smoothness".  

Although the term refers to smoothness just about anywhere else, my understanding is that, in regard to fountain pen nibs, "baby's bottom" does not, but rather to a nib issue where the two halves of the tine mimic the shape of a baby's bottom, thereby interrupting capillary action and restricting ink flow. If this is correct, using the expression to describe smoothness can be confusing. Shouldn't we stay with the proverbial "butter on hot Teflon" for this purpose?


James


#14 Manalto

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 07:42

Many, many, many years ago, I bought my mother-in-law a Waterman Hemisphere.  It was a year

when $39.95 was a heavy price for a fountain pen. 

 

Mom passed-on last month.  Her son went through her Spartan possessions, and sent us a few things.

The presence of her Waterman was clear in letters and many volumes of her journals.  Oh, yeah ! 

I got the Waterman back, and it has a honored spot with other heirloom pens.

 

$39.95 wasn't such a heavy price, after all.  

 

I'm glad the pen ended up in the right hands, where it will be appreciated. Thanks for your story.


James


#15 chromantic

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 17:30

I'm primarily a Parker guy but I like to experiment. I came across the Hemisphere and thought it looked nice enough but just sort of filed it away for future reference. Then I stumbled on a Metallic Cognac, omg, I had to have it. Just came the other day and haven't tried it out yet (waiting on ink and converter) but it is absolutely stunning. Was so impressed I went ahead and ordered the Comet Red, which was the one that had originally caught my eye.

I enjoyed your review and am looking forward to using mine.


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#16 Old_Inkyhand

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 19:29

I got interested in fountain pens thanks to a nice little Hemisphere.

I wanted to have a fountain pen, but I simply couldn't afford one (I have always been trying to buy everything with my own money). This is why my father decided to give me a Hemisphere. He used to be a fountain pen user many years ago, but in his job he uses mainly computer and self-copy paper. The Hemisphere was abandoned for quite a few years - fortunately I gave her a new loving home.

 

After 18 months of usage (including about 10 months of heavy usage) I have a few observations:

- the finish (a matter of taste) - I wouldn't have chosen stainless steel with gold trim, but it is just my personal opinion.

- the plating - it has tarnished a  bit, but not in an easily noticeable way, it doesn't flake or come off visibly. It collects all the scrathes, especially the plating on the flat end of the barrel and on the end of the cap.

+ the metal - the brushed stainless steel wonderfully covers scratches and doesn't collect fingerprints

+ the nib - it is nice and gives a pleasant amount of feedback, I have adjusted it to suit my taste and fix after a small accident, but it wasn't necessary

- long writing - I have very small hands and this is a thin pen. Sounds like a perfect combination. Unfortunately, I have experienced much hand fatigue during long writing sessions. My Carene is better for this purpose, as it has a thicker section. If you like thin pens, it shouldn't be a problem though.

 

I don't use it very often nowadays, but I would never consider giving it away.

 

It is a charming little pen, use it with joy  :)

 

EDIT: And it is sooo wonderful for people who like fancy finishes and colours. Sometimes I barely resist the urge to buy a new Hemisphere just for its look.


Edited by Old_Inkyhand, 20 March 2016 - 19:32.


#17 Jozsef K.

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 04:44

I got interested in fountain pens thanks to a nice little Hemisphere.

I wanted to have a fountain pen, but I simply couldn't afford one (I have always been trying to buy everything with my own money). This is why my father decided to give me a Hemisphere. He used to be a fountain pen user many years ago, but in his job he uses mainly computer and self-copy paper. The Hemisphere was abandoned for quite a few years - fortunately I gave her a new loving home.

 

After 18 months of usage (including about 10 months of heavy usage) I have a few observations:

- the finish (a matter of taste) - I wouldn't have chosen stainless steel with gold trim, but it is just my personal opinion.

- the plating - it has tarnished a  bit, but not in an easily noticeable way, it doesn't flake or come off visibly. It collects all the scrathes, especially the plating on the flat end of the barrel and on the end of the cap.

+ the metal - the brushed stainless steel wonderfully covers scratches and doesn't collect fingerprints

+ the nib - it is nice and gives a pleasant amount of feedback, I have adjusted it to suit my taste and fix after a small accident, but it wasn't necessary

- long writing - I have very small hands and this is a thin pen. Sounds like a perfect combination. Unfortunately, I have experienced much hand fatigue during long writing sessions. My Carene is better for this purpose, as it has a thicker section. If you like thin pens, it shouldn't be a problem though.

 

I don't use it very often nowadays, but I would never consider giving it away.

 

It is a charming little pen, use it with joy  :)

 

EDIT: And it is sooo wonderful for people who like fancy finishes and colours. Sometimes I barely resist the urge to buy a new Hemisphere just for its look.

 

Hand fatigue after long writing sessions. That's interesting. Do you use to hold the pen at lower part of the section, near to the nib? I am trying to figure out how long is the section, and the nib?

 

img-2016-10-20-07-37-55_zpsnu4zsi4q.png


Best,

Jozsef K.







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