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#1 WOBentley

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 14:34

I was looking through some of the ink reviews and came across this brief excerpt from Crewel's review of Iroshizuku Tsuki-yo.

Posted Image

The top two lines show the writing styles I would like to learn. I believe these are Copperplate (or a type of copperplate?) and Italic (certainly there are likely many styles of Italic, so maybe I need more specificity in nomenclature?). I have a couple of questions
1. Is it possible to write in these styles fairly rapidly, i.e. can I use these styles for my everyday handwriting (after suitable practice!), or are these too demanding of time to use that way?
2.Other than time and patience ;) what do I need to get started; Any good books, practice sheets, tips, videos, pointers? Very specific recommendations would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!!!

Edited by WOBentley, 02 February 2013 - 14:36.

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#2 mliptrot

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 18:07

I was looking through some of the ink reviews and came across this brief excerpt from Crewel's review of Iroshizuku Tsuki-yo.

Posted Image

The top two lines show the writing styles I would like to learn. I believe these are Copperplate (or a type of copperplate?) and Italic (certainly there are likely many styles of Italic, so maybe I need more specificity in nomenclature?). I have a couple of questions
1. Is it possible to write in these styles fairly rapidly, i.e. can I use these styles for my everyday handwriting (after suitable practice!), or are these too demanding of time to use that way?
2.Other than time and patience ;) what do I need to get started; Any good books, practice sheets, tips, videos, pointers? Very specific recommendations would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!!!


Hello there,

I've been practising for a few years now, both at calligraphy and improving my handwriting. I sought out The Osmiroid Book of calligraphy (1p + postage from Amazon) and that was a great start. It's got advice on the fundamentals of calligraphy and also a nice simplified Italic that you can use as a quicker form of handwriting.

I've got to the stage now where I can produce a simplified italic - with a straight-cut nib - or copperplate - with a flexible nib - at a reasonable speed.

As to the picture, the italic is fairly 'sharp' and you can find examples of many different italic styles. My 'natural' style is slightly less sharp than in the second line, but not as rounded as I have seen elsewhere.

Mark

#3 Keyless Works

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:21

wow I wish my hand writing looked like that. People always ask my if my parents were doctors because my hand writing is so bad. :headsmack:

#4 WOBentley

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 04:54

wow I wish my hand writing looked like that. People always ask my if my parents were doctors because my hand writing is so bad. :headsmack:

I am a doctor...so you know how much help I need!
Thanks for the responses so far!
Dave
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#5 Mickey

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 05:52

Either hand can be written quickly enough for daily handwriting. Of the two, Round Hand is potentially the more rapid and definitely more rapid in its monoline or business writing form (no shades). Where Italic has an advantage is in portability. Where shaded Round Hand, as in the example, is more easily and effectively done with dip pens, Italic can be done quite well with a fountain pen.

Edited for correction. The first hand is a strongly slanted Round Hand or Copperplate, not Spencerian.

Edited by Mickey, 04 February 2013 - 03:40.

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#6 WOBentley

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 19:57

Thanks Mickey!
So that is Spencerian? Learning something every day, that helps with knowing where to look for information.
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#7 Mickey

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 21:53

Thanks Mickey!
So that is Spencerian? Learning something every day, that helps with knowing where to look for information.


It's actually Copperplate. What threw me at first, was the slant, which is extreme even for Spencerian. (Copperplate is written at 55 degrees, Spencerian at 52, and the sample at barely 48 degrees.) I didn't bother to look at the actual letter forms, the slant yelled Spencerian. Bad on me. Sloppy me.

Still, the same advice applies. Round Hand can be written rapidly, though most practitioners these days do not do so, leaning more in the direction of Engrosser's (or Engraver's) script for inspiration, which is written or drawn quite deliberately.

If you want to see actual Spencerian check out

http://www.iampeth.c...lege_letter.jpg

or

http://www.iampeth.c...udy_as_much.jpg

And to see Copperplate

http://www.iampeth.c...certificate.jpg

As I said, bad on me.

Edited by Mickey, 03 February 2013 - 21:58.

But I believe that since my life began

The most I've had is just a talent to abuse.

Hey ho, if love were all.

 

With apologies to Noel Coward


#8 Ken Fraser

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:37

The top two lines show the writing styles I would like to learn. I believe these are Copperplate (or a type of copperplate?) and Italic

In pinned topics at the top of this forum, there are examples in various styles including Italic, Copperplate and Spencerian in "Depository..." and instructions in Italic in "Handwriting Aids...".

Ken

Available at :   www.kenfrasercalligrapher.com

 

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#9 josiah

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:47

Either hand can be written quickly enough for daily handwriting. Of the two, Round Hand is potentially the more rapid and definitely more rapid in its monoline or business writing form (no shades). Where Italic has an advantage is in portability. Where shaded Round Hand, as in the example, is more easily and effectively done with dip pens, Italic can be done quite well with a fountain pen.


Or, if you are more particular than you are accurate like me, you'll spend a long time writing whatever way you choose, so pick one you like.

Unless I'm using a flexible nib (on a fountain pen or with a dip pen), my cursive is rotten: I need the directional feedback of the nib to guide me. When I have to use a stiff, smooth nib, or if I'm stuck with a ballpoint, I revert to my semi-cursive italic handwriting. It may be a little bit slower for me, but at least it's legible.

If you want a more-or-less standard roundhand-derived cursive handwriting (including, say, Spencerian or Palmer), I will defer to others to guide you. But if you want an italic handwriting:

In general, if you like stub nibs or italic (or chisel-point) nibs, italic is a good choice for a handwriting. If you want an italic handwriting, you can certainly use a mono-width nib, but my reflex as a teacher would be that learning with a chisel nib helps to learn why certain shapes work the way they do. I have an Article In Progress™ about this very topic, and will spare you. In any case, my handwriting usually settles on italic, and my better examples of cursive usually use italic letter shapes as a base.

#10 tdzb36

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 09:53

Wo .......... your penmanship is too nice!

#11 DanielCoffey

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 14:38

wow I wish my hand writing looked like that. People always ask my if my parents were doctors because my hand writing is so bad. :headsmack:


To which you should reply... "Yes, but I can afford not to worry about it."

#12 torstar

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 15:00

Where there's a will, there's a way.

Slow and steady and tons of hours and painful patience and you are on your way.

#13 dickydotcom

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 16:04

From a complete amateur who tries both styles:
Copperplate style with the line variation I find very slow. I think it really requires a dip pen to get the fabulous effects shown.
I do use a monoline version in everyday writing and while it looks OK it's no work of art.
I also carry at least one italic nibbed pen and if I want something to look a bit better I'll use italic. It is bit slower than my standard writing but quicker than trying to use a flexible nib.
Dick D

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#14 torstar

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 16:16

From a complete amateur who tries both styles:
Copperplate style with the line variation I find very slow. I think it really requires a dip pen to get the fabulous effects shown.
I do use a monoline version in everyday writing and while it looks OK it's no work of art.
I also carry at least one italic nibbed pen and if I want something to look a bit better I'll use italic. It is bit slower than my standard writing but quicker than trying to use a flexible nib.
Dick D

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Very impressive if you are just learning to write like this!!

#15 WOBentley

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 17:35

Thanks all for the tips.
Ken, I will look more thoroughly at the lists above especially now with some feedback! I don't think I can ever hope to have your level of skill!
Dick D, Our native handwriting is very similar so I have some hope now, thanks!

I do prefer using edged nibs, mostly CI's and I have some dip pens and nibs and have been playing around a bit, but want to get more serious. As stated above I guess all I need is TONS of practice :roflmho:
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#16 Penne Stilografiche

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 21:34

Barnes and Noble has some nice Calligraphy books. I'm 14 and I basically mastered the Italic style in about 2 hours of practice.
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#17 MusinkMan

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:04

Barnes and Noble has some nice Calligraphy books. I'm 14 and I basically mastered the Italic style in about 2 hours of practice.



You mastered the Italic Style in 2 hours of practice? Um, are you certain that you mastered it? You would impress the hell out of me if you mastered any style with 2 hours of practice. :rolleyes:
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#18 Mickey

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:09


Barnes and Noble has some nice Calligraphy books. I'm 14 and I basically mastered the Italic style in about 2 hours of practice.



You mastered the Italic Style in 2 hours of practice? Um, are you certain that you mastered it? You would impress the hell out of me if you mastered any style with 2 hours of practice. :rolleyes:


In an (d)evolving language where 'awesome' has now become a mild expression of approval, mastery means you figured out which end of the pen goes on the paper.

But I believe that since my life began

The most I've had is just a talent to abuse.

Hey ho, if love were all.

 

With apologies to Noel Coward


#19 medicalcpa

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:36

Barnes and Noble has some nice Calligraphy books. I'm 14 and I basically mastered the Italic style in about 2 hours of practice.



Pics or it didn't happen.

#20 atamantara

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 16:04

Pics or it didn't happen.


I second this. After using a italic nib, I didn't found it too hard to "use", but I have a long road to "master" it. Plus, do you have some pics of the before/after trying the italic nib? I'm curious about it.

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#21 thang1thang2

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 18:19

In an (d)evolving language where 'awesome' has now become a mild expression of approval, mastery means you figured out which end of the pen goes on the paper.


Awesome, broski, that grammar, like, right there that you, like, just used was just, like, uhm, like just so stupendously fantabulous and, like, totally amazing! Yo. B)

#22 Mickey

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 18:50


In an (d)evolving language where 'awesome' has now become a mild expression of approval, mastery means you figured out which end of the pen goes on the paper.


Awesome, broski, that grammar, like, right there that you, like, just used was just, like, uhm, like just so stupendously fantabulous and, like, totally amazing! Yo. B)


...and no, I can't get you Scarlett Johansson's cell phone number.

But I believe that since my life began

The most I've had is just a talent to abuse.

Hey ho, if love were all.

 

With apologies to Noel Coward


#23 thang1thang2

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 19:17

...and no, I can't get you Scarlett Johansson's cell phone number.



Awww...

That's okay, I don't think my girlfriend would allow me to own such a phone number, anyway. :roflmho:

#24 neuro23

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 16:40

Rather than post a new topic on such a similar topic (but without "jacking" your thread WOBentley), I too am looking to learn a different style. I also really like the top line of Crewel's review of Iroshizuku Tsuki-yo but I'm looking for a cursive set of capitals that easily join to lowercase letters and that can be written with a nib such as a Sailor fine. I'm happy with the lower case cursive I adopted from here. I've found some cursive Russian similar the style Immoteus used in his [url="[url="http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php?/topic/62598-pilot-ajisaihydrangea-brief-review/page__p__603381#entry603381"]Pilot Ajisai ink review[/url].

TIA for any help!

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