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Just Found A Stylist


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19 replies to this topic

#1 jptech

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 00:52

While visiting my mom for christmas, I asked her about the pens she had. We looked in her junk drawer and imagine what I found.
The Barrel says Esterbrook Made is USA. The Skrip was bone dry when I found it. I added an ounce of water. I rinsed the nib for a minute and it just started writing.
I know the sac isn't filling. I rinsed it completely and no more ink comes out, but I can't get it to fill, so there must be a hole in it under that sheath.

Is it possible to remove the sheath? Is it possible to replace the sac? I didn't find the base or chain that goes with the set.

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#2 pajaro

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 01:09

In the thread about repair topics, read the thread about replacing the sac on an M2. What you have there looks identical to an M2 squeeze filler. The sheath comes off as the thread says.

http://www.fountainp...-esterbrook-m2/

Edited by pajaro, 27 December 2012 - 01:12.

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#3 jptech

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 01:26

In the thread about repair topics, read the thread about replacing the sac on an M2. What you have there looks identical to an M2 squeeze filler. The sheath comes off as the thread says.

http://www.fountainp...-esterbrook-m2/


Thank you! Strangely, the sac is still supple where it was exposed to air. Now how do I figure out what size this is?

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Edited by jptech, 27 December 2012 - 01:27.


#4 pajaro

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:24


In the thread about repair topics, read the thread about replacing the sac on an M2. What you have there looks identical to an M2 squeeze filler. The sheath comes off as the thread says.

http://www.fountainp...-esterbrook-m2/


Thank you! Strangely, the sac is still supple where it was exposed to air. Now how do I figure out what size this is?

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Your filler does look like the M2 filler. Recommendations I have read for sac size were a size 14 sac or a size 16 sac. I have pulled the squeeze frame from the M2, but haven't got around to the resac job yet. I figured I would buy both and see which one would fit best. I have also been tempted to try a new silicone sac, for longer life. I think all this is in the repair thread compilation done recently, which has links to the threads.

Edited by pajaro, 27 December 2012 - 03:25.

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#5 GClef

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:36

Is that 9550 one of the sweeetest nibs, or what?!
Now, THAT'S an "everyday writer", once it all set up.

#6 jptech

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:29

Is that 9550 one of the sweeetest nibs, or what?!
Now, THAT'S an "everyday writer", once it all set up.


Mine's scratchy. I'm left-handed and the previous user was right-handed.


I'm gonna have to grind it a bit.

I've got 2000 grit metal wet/dry sandpaper I'll try. I heard the 9000 series are iridium tipped. Will grinding remove that?

Edited by jptech, 27 December 2012 - 04:29.


#7 GClef

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 06:12


Is that 9550 one of the sweeetest nibs, or what?!
Now, THAT'S an "everyday writer", once it all set up.


Mine's scratchy. I'm left-handed and the previous user was right-handed.


I'm gonna have to grind it a bit.

I've got 2000 grit metal wet/dry sandpaper I'll try. I heard the 9000 series are iridium tipped. Will grinding remove that?


Before you hit it with the sandpaper, check to make sure it just not misaligned.
I would guess that sanding would somehow remove some iridium.

#8 myn

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 13:51

What a sweet find. You've got a beautiful pen there.
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#9 pajaro

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 14:39

This is the first I have seen of a desk pen like this. Is this unusual or rare?

Definitely check the nib alignment before you use sandpaper on the nib. Before using sandpaper to smooth the nib, I would try using one of those nail-smoothing blocks found in drugstores, and I would start with the moderate smoothing surface on the block. I am left handed. I sometimes find Estie nibs to be a tad scratchy, even in cases where right handed people think they are smooth. I think the tipping surface might have some micro-corrosion on it that can be gently smoothed off. I have had to do this smoothing to 9550 and 9556 nibs that sellers thought were smooth writers. I have also gently smoothed some NOS nibs to remove some kind of sharpness. Sandpaper would be my last resort, but I have used it where gentler methods and aligning the tines failed to produce satisfactory results. I don't think you will get one of these Estie nibs to write with the same smoothness as a Montblanc, Parker 51 or Pelikan, but Esties, when properly and gently smoothed have a unique smoothness all their own for me. It feels like writing with a velvet nib.
"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

#10 jptech

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 15:33

This is the first I have seen of a desk pen like this. Is this unusual or rare?

Definitely check the nib alignment before you use sandpaper on the nib. Before using sandpaper to smooth the nib, I would try using one of those nail-smoothing blocks found in drugstores, and I would start with the moderate smoothing surface on the block. I am left handed. I sometimes find Estie nibs to be a tad scratchy, even in cases where right handed people think they are smooth. I think the tipping surface might have some micro-corrosion on it that can be gently smoothed off. I have had to do this smoothing to 9550 and 9556 nibs that sellers thought were smooth writers. I have also gently smoothed some NOS nibs to remove some kind of sharpness. Sandpaper would be my last resort, but I have used it where gentler methods and aligning the tines failed to produce satisfactory results. I don't think you will get one of these Estie nibs to write with the same smoothness as a Montblanc, Parker 51 or Pelikan, but Esties, when properly and gently smoothed have a unique smoothness all their own for me. It feels like writing with a velvet nib.


Well here's the thing about the 2000 grit sand paper. It actually puts a shiny polish on soft metal. Strange and counter-intuitive, but true. I use it for copper heat sinks for my computer processor. I start with 1000 to remove CNC machining marks and go to 2000 to shine it up. It's much much finer than a nail-smoothing block. There's a post here which has pictures to show what it does to copper.

As for the pen, there's no cap to speak of, and That makes me think about buying a barrel and cap for another type of Esterbrook.

I'm awaiting a sac order from pendemonium. In the mean time, a single dip and I can actually write a half a page with this pen.

#11 jptech

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 15:34

What a sweet find. You've got a beautiful pen there.


My sister is sending me the other pens my mom had. I am pretty sure there's at least one wahl eversharp in there.

#12 jptech

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 04:28

Quick update. My sister is sending me a Wahl Eversharp Skyline All gold fill FP

And I have also done the re-sac on the stylist. It was quite easy as I'm no stranger to repairs, small repairs, or crafting. I have also purchased an esterbrook base on ebay.

Unfortunately the 9550 nib has been damaged by stupidity. I'm going to get another.

After the re-sac, I filled it with diamine chocolate brown. It wrote well except for a tiny amount of scratch. I have screwed up my first vintage FP nib. I started to grind it with 2000 grit sandpaper, which is finer than nail blocks and other such things.
Well, the alignment was slightly off and I kept grinding. Now the tip digs into paper when pushing, and the osmiridium is 99% gone. Stupid mistake, but It's my first, and hopefully got my big mistake out of the way. It's not the first time I've done fine micro grinding, but this nib is just too fine for me to reshape without experience.

So I decided to just get another 9550. I will post pics when it's complete. I also have been continually washing it out with water. And when the brown finally went away, it's started washing blue. The 50 year old skrip blue is starting to wash out.
I will be soaking this pen until the nib comes free from the section. If anyone wants the nib after I remove it, let me know. It's possible to restore by an experienced nibmeister I would imagine. It would need to be re-aligned and re-tipped.

I've had a blast with this one and I can't wait to start on the eversharp skyline.

Edited by jptech, 01 January 2013 - 04:33.


#13 pajaro

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:02

[Well here's the thing about the 2000 grit sand paper. It actually puts a shiny polish on soft metal. Strange and counter-intuitive, but true. I use it for copper heat sinks for my computer processor. I start with 1000 to remove CNC machining marks and go to 2000 to shine it up. It's much much finer than a nail-smoothing block. There's a post here which has pictures to show what it does to copper.



I see. You are asserting that 2000 grit sandpaper is smoother than all four surfaces of a nail-smoothing block? Four progressively finer surfaces.
"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

#14 jptech

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:01


[Well here's the thing about the 2000 grit sand paper. It actually puts a shiny polish on soft metal. Strange and counter-intuitive, but true. I use it for copper heat sinks for my computer processor. I start with 1000 to remove CNC machining marks and go to 2000 to shine it up. It's much much finer than a nail-smoothing block. There's a post here which has pictures to show what it does to copper.



I see. You are asserting that 2000 grit sandpaper is smoother than all four surfaces of a nail-smoothing block? Four progressively finer surfaces.


Unless you're using a nail block with finer than 2000. Though I've never seen one.

#15 jptech

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:54

I have fully restored this pen to it's original working condition. The nib is NOS, the sac was done by me. Size 16.

The pen holder is not the original style which was used on the stylist. That style featured a chain which would attach via a ring onto the joint near the end of the pen.

This pen holder suits me fine. I'm really glad I fixed it. The nib needs some breaking in, as it's a tiny bit scratchy on copy paper.

It is a much later model nib than the original 9550. It's design is completely different than the original. I don't know whether this is a fake or not.

The one in the first pics is the original legit nib. Does anyone know when the 9550 was manufactured? And if it changed design?


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ink is Noodler's Liberty's Elysium

Edited by jptech, 08 January 2013 - 01:57.


#16 pajaro

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 03:46

That nib is genuine, as you wrote, it is the later style. I find all these nibs need some smoothing, as you noted. Nice pen.
"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

#17 Gerry

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:45



[Well here's the thing about the 2000 grit sand paper. It actually puts a shiny polish on soft metal. Strange and counter-intuitive, but true. I use it for copper heat sinks for my computer processor. I start with 1000 to remove CNC machining marks and go to 2000 to shine it up. It's much much finer than a nail-smoothing block. There's a post here which has pictures to show what it does to copper.



I see. You are asserting that 2000 grit sandpaper is smoother than all four surfaces of a nail-smoothing block? Four progressively finer surfaces.


Unless you're using a nail block with finer than 2000. Though I've never seen one.


The three surface nail files sold by a number of pen supliers such as WoodBin - http://www.woodbin.c...shProducts.html contain grit as fine as 12,000. While I know that different suppliers / materials have different scales for fineness, rarely are they different more than 2:1 - so these would be at a minimum, 6,000 grit. They will give you a mirror shine. I use them for plastic polishing, nib smoothing and other metal polishing.

Regards,

Gerry

#18 pajaro

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:23




[Well here's the thing about the 2000 grit sand paper. It actually puts a shiny polish on soft metal. Strange and counter-intuitive, but true. I use it for copper heat sinks for my computer processor. I start with 1000 to remove CNC machining marks and go to 2000 to shine it up. It's much much finer than a nail-smoothing block. There's a post here which has pictures to show what it does to copper.



I see. You are asserting that 2000 grit sandpaper is smoother than all four surfaces of a nail-smoothing block? Four progressively finer surfaces.


Unless you're using a nail block with finer than 2000. Though I've never seen one.


The three surface nail files sold by a number of pen supliers such as WoodBin - http://www.woodbin.c...shProducts.html contain grit as fine as 12,000. While I know that different suppliers / materials have different scales for fineness, rarely are they different more than 2:1 - so these would be at a minimum, 6,000 grit. They will give you a mirror shine. I use them for plastic polishing, nib smoothing and other metal polishing.

Regards,

Gerry


That's what I thought. It was in threads here on nib smoothing that I found out about these smoothers. Those guys gave me a thrashing about using 2000 sandpaper.

About the Stylist: how common is this pen? I haven't seen one before, and I like it.
"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

#19 jptech

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 22:02

That's what I thought. It was in threads here on nib smoothing that I found out about these smoothers. Those guys gave me a thrashing about using 2000 sandpaper.

About the Stylist: how common is this pen? I haven't seen one before, and I like it.


It's not common at all. I've only seen one picture online of the pen, which is how I identified it.
This post has it.

http://www.fountainp...ylist-desk-set/

And this page
http://www.pendemoni...ook_gallery.htm

I don't have the original base or chain, though I do remember seeing them while growing up.

The base is a DB113 porcelain base.

Edited by jptech, 13 January 2013 - 22:03.


#20 pajaro

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:01


That's what I thought. It was in threads here on nib smoothing that I found out about these smoothers. Those guys gave me a thrashing about using 2000 sandpaper.

About the Stylist: how common is this pen? I haven't seen one before, and I like it.


It's not common at all. I've only seen one picture online of the pen, which is how I identified it.
This post has it.

http://www.fountainp...ylist-desk-set/

And this page
http://www.pendemoni...ook_gallery.htm

I don't have the original base or chain, though I do remember seeing them while growing up.

The base is a DB113 porcelain base.


Thank you for the links. It might be that you have a rare pen. Congratulations on having that pen. I like the squeeze fillers. They are very convenient, and they use the same size sac as the lever fillers. A nice and unusual pen.
"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.