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#61 Citygirl

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 19:39

I find that things always seem better once the decision is made

A bookbinder shouldn't cost too much, and will give you those journals back in book format. Costs nothing to phone and ask for a quote.

As for you paper journal in the future, use whatever book format you find best. I look for ones with 80 gsm or heavier paper (same weight as standard copy paper as a guide), firm covers (doesn't necessarily need to be hardback) and lays flat when open (it's easier to write on both sides of a page). This is what suits me, but I hope it gives you a few pointers to consider.

Lastly, well done for asking your boyfriend. Not an easy conversation to have, but glad that it helped you come to a decision.



Thanks for this, as for the book binding, I just wonder about the cost as the scanning cost me £145 which I thought would be less just to run pages through a scanner.

#62 Renfield

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 21:12


I find that things always seem better once the decision is made

A bookbinder shouldn't cost too much, and will give you those journals back in book format. Costs nothing to phone and ask for a quote.

As for you paper journal in the future, use whatever book format you find best. I look for ones with 80 gsm or heavier paper (same weight as standard copy paper as a guide), firm covers (doesn't necessarily need to be hardback) and lays flat when open (it's easier to write on both sides of a page). This is what suits me, but I hope it gives you a few pointers to consider.

Lastly, well done for asking your boyfriend. Not an easy conversation to have, but glad that it helped you come to a decision.



Thanks for this, as for the book binding, I just wonder about the cost as the scanning cost me £145 which I thought would be less just to run pages through a scanner.


Scanning would take more man hours as each page needed scanned, whereas with a binder its just sticking them together.
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#63 indigoskye

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 06:31

Thank you for your helpful suggestions. Part of me does steer towards journalling with pen and paper, keeping the old ones under lock and key is OK but that could be a bind with the current one as it would be pain unlocking it every time I want to write in it.

Another worry about the locked tin is that, and I know its morbid, but what about when I am gone, someone will have to go through my stuff and will be maybe forced to get into the tin incase anything they need to deal with is in there. I wouldn't want anyone, especially my boyfriend and family, to read any hurtful words in there.


I have been journaling for most of my life. For the past ten years it has been in a private online blog, but this year I have returned to a paper journal that I create entries with a fountain pen. I am in the process of downloading the online blog and storing it in a digital file, but I am thinking that I'd like to print and bind them onto paper one day. I feel that a paper journal is more secure privacy wise than storage on a computer or the internet. When I have downloaded the online blog, I will destroy it. I would never dream of removing it before I had saved my entries.

I find that when I look back at my past, I prefer to hold those memories on paper. Perhaps that makes me old-fashioned? I do not worry that others will read what I have written, although I do not show my journals to anyone and consider them private. If someone is interested in reading about my life after I'm gone, they are welcome to do so, but I fear they will find my day to day musings to be somewhat boring. I did have the bad experience of a nosy younger brother reading my diary when I was a pre-teen and then mocking me about what was written there. The memory makes me wince to this day. It has not stopped me from writing a private journal or publishing stories and articles.

What I suggest to you is to backup your journals via a camera to pdf and store the journals on a thumbdrive in a bank deposit box. The files you have already scanned can go on the thumb drive right now. Do not store your private entries on your computer where someone might find them. That way, if there is a fire in your home, you will not lose your past writing. Keep the paper journals in your tin box with a lock. However, make a pac with someone you trust to destroy the journals in the event of your death. Jane Austen had this done to her personal letters by her sister and now we the curious public will never know the details of her private life. It is a great loss, but it was her wish and those desires were respected.

Try and not be so self conscience about what you have written. Your journal is private and the world is not hungry to see every detail of your life. If your boyfriend is being nosy and does not respect your privacy, you may need to find a new boyfriend. Good luck to you...and happy journaling. :)
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#64 CS388

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 17:27

Interesting thread. Thanks. Pleased you found a solution.

Some years ago someone accessed and read my private writings.

The immediate effect this had was that it changed my writing. I found I was tempering what I wrote, in case it was read by others.

It is important (to me) to have somewhere to write which no-one else ever sees.
If any good comes of this writing, I can shape it up/work on it and then share it with appropriate others.
On rare occasions, it comes out fully formed, then I can choose to share it with appropriate others.
But for the most part, the original scrawl/spew which comes out is not intended for others' eyes. It's merely part of a process, rather than an end in itself.
(It's not state secrets, or damning indictments or abusive missives. It's rubbish for the most part - but private rubbish.)

I feel this privacy is an important part of the writing process and it took me some time to get over the intrusion and get back to a more honest style of writing.
My circumstances have now changed, privacy has returned and I can write whatever I want without any self censorship.

I do have about 25 years of old journals stashed in an old wooden chest. As you, I have considered shredding or burning them, But they're still there.

Thanks again.
Good luck.

#65 rustymac40

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 22:40

This is a very interesting topic for me. I have two sets of journals, a set for my kids and a set for my wife. My kids will get theirs when I feel they might be interested, or when I pass on. My wife will get hers on our 25th wedding anniversary. I want my journals to be read at some point...but until then, I have always kept them locked in a small safe under my nightstand.
I hope you find an answer to your delima and keep the pen to your journal.

Regards, Russ

#66 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:57

I'm glad you decided to keep the old ones and continue to journal citygirl.

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#67 Octo

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:07

As you investigate book binding companies, you may find the cost is not too high.

Have you considered rebinding them yourself? There are some wonderful threads on FPN with instructions on how to do so.

Would you consider stitching the pages together yourself? Even coverless, the stitched journals could be stored in a box or safe, etc. Only you would read the journals if you stitch them yourself.

Edited by Octo, 07 January 2013 - 06:11.


#68 duboing

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 20:23

Hi City-Girl, and thanks (everyone) for an interesting thread.

I journal too, for the good of my mental health. For me it's less about reading it back than clarifying my thoughts there and then (Harry Potter fans will understand the idea of the pensieve :rolleyes: ). I would curl up and die if the people involved read some of this stuff, because this is the place where I expose my darkest thoughts - if I can't be honest with myself, there'd be no point at all. Taken out of context, ie: without considering the development of thoughts, and without the inside of my head as reference, it could look pretty awful. Fortunately, my family and friends have more sense, and more honour than to read my journals, but I keep my current one about me, and the others well out of temptations way. I can't blame you for being paranoid about it: you've had some bloody awful experiences. So much the more reason you need to feel able to journal effectively, and I don't know about you, but I connect with my thoughts more effectively with ink and paper than I could do with a keyboard. So, if you want to spend money on it, I'd suggest you get the sort of safe they have in hotels: you can fit a lot of paper in one of those, and good luck to anybody trying to pick that lock!

Regarding the future-proofing of your digital records, I actually work in digital archival, so I have some experience here. Don't stress too much about the storage medium: just make sure, each time you replace your computer or upgrade your operating system, that you check that you can access the files. Keep them on two separate pieces of hardware, and in separate locations. USB flash drives are cheap, and can be password-protected, but consider optical discs too. More critical is the data format: I guess your data are in image files? Our image archiving standard is JPEG (.jpg) - it's been around for quite a while and is likely to be around for a long while to come, and it's readable by pretty much any image viewing software. If your files are in some obscure image format, take the time to convert them to JPEG, or you'll be struggling to find something that recognises them in a few years.

#69 Citygirl

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:12

Hi City-Girl, and thanks (everyone) for an interesting thread.

I journal too, for the good of my mental health. For me it's less about reading it back than clarifying my thoughts there and then (Harry Potter fans will understand the idea of the pensieve :rolleyes: ). I would curl up and die if the people involved read some of this stuff, because this is the place where I expose my darkest thoughts - if I can't be honest with myself, there'd be no point at all. Taken out of context, ie: without considering the development of thoughts, and without the inside of my head as reference, it could look pretty awful. Fortunately, my family and friends have more sense, and more honour than to read my journals, but I keep my current one about me, and the others well out of temptations way. I can't blame you for being paranoid about it: you've had some bloody awful experiences. So much the more reason you need to feel able to journal effectively, and I don't know about you, but I connect with my thoughts more effectively with ink and paper than I could do with a keyboard. So, if you want to spend money on it, I'd suggest you get the sort of safe they have in hotels: you can fit a lot of paper in one of those, and good luck to anybody trying to pick that lock!

Regarding the future-proofing of your digital records, I actually work in digital archival, so I have some experience here. Don't stress too much about the storage medium: just make sure, each time you replace your computer or upgrade your operating system, that you check that you can access the files. Keep them on two separate pieces of hardware, and in separate locations. USB flash drives are cheap, and can be password-protected, but consider optical discs too. More critical is the data format: I guess your data are in image files? Our image archiving standard is JPEG (.jpg) - it's been around for quite a while and is likely to be around for a long while to come, and it's readable by pretty much any image viewing software. If your files are in some obscure image format, take the time to convert them to JPEG, or you'll be struggling to find something that recognises them in a few years.


Thank you for this. I also need to journal for the sake of my mental health but moreso when I am upset or annoyed about something which is why there is a fair bit on venting in my journals. I do want to go back and take out some pages which refer to my family that I don't want them ever to see but the other stuff I can live with being there, some of it is also embarrassing but as you say you have to write for yourself and not others. I too feel more at ease journalling on paper.

#70 suexilin

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 15:53

I wrote in another thread about writing in my journal, and I think I will paste here some of the post.

I think that it is important to keep your journals,,,at least part of them. Writing the bad stuff is necessary, I do it too, it gets it out of me and on a page. Pages are easier to deal with, then confused feelings.

I started keeping a diary when I was 10. Back then it was simple stuff - what I ate, who I played with, what books I read. (I'm addicted to reading.)

When I was 14-15, the content of my journals drastically changed. I can say that now, because 2 years ago I dug up all diaries from the depth of my desk and started reading them. I fell in love with this 15 year old girl I have been - sparkling with new ideas, with questions, with fluid handwriting and longworded sentences. She is someone I wish I could have remained all my life.

Later, age 16, the tone had changed. I had found a new group of friends, I had started to imitate the way they spoke. I had started to swear, carefully at first, and generously later. I was dismissive, impatient, arrogant, and self-centered. I have been a horrible teenager, I think.
Later, after befriending people from my high school - (I was in a French lycee in Bulgaria) the tone changed yet again. It is fascinating to observe how the friends you keep influence your way of thinking, from the words you use to the questions you ask. The expletives disappeared, and music lyrics started filling the pages. I tracked the development of my music tastes - the first lyrics deemed worthy of writing down were from Beatles, then Queen, then Nirvana, then Metallica, then Blind Guardian,then Jimmy Hendrix, then Pink Floyd, ...I could also see how the level of my English was getting better - by the lyrics I was finding meaningful.

Some pages were filled with rage. There were huge angry letters, screaming I HATE YOU! and newly appeared expletives as well, this time coded in English, a vain attempt to sound better. I hated using swear words in my language, they tasted bad. Using them in English at that time removed the coarseness somehow. Some of them were directed at my parents. Years later, when I was rereading my diaries with delight, I tore off those pages and threw them away, hoping that my parents have not seen them. It would have hurt my mom so bad, coming suddenly from nowhere, because now my father is not here anymore, and my mom and I have a great relationship. Actually we've always had, just that I seem to have been a very angry teenager.

Later the first loves came, some with relationships, some one-sided and silently pleading from the breathlessly written pages.

The diaries were the place where I wrote my poems too, after several drafts on flying paper, I transferred the sculptured verses on the pages and dedicated each and everyone to someone from my life.

Then I went to university, and the diaries recorded new friendships, lots of parties, lots of entries written in the middle of the night, when I had come back from a dance club, and needed to write a bit, so I can record the excitement I felt, and to allow the room to stop spinning. I was never much good with alcohol.

Then I came to China, and the diaries captured the novelty of everything, the new smells, tastes and cultures, the names of my colleagues at the university here, names that I needed help remembering and spelling. The journals kept inside their pages the loneliness I was afraid of spilling out, the feeling of displacement that enveloped me every evening while I was pulling the curtains to keep the night out.

Then I stopped writing. There were entries, one per year? Not very happy, not very meaningful...there were just dated words on a page that confirmed that I existed. I guess that this is all I did- existed. Alongside people, jobs, and passing friends. Years went by. I was still not writing. I was updating my facebook statuses, yes, but how much can you really write there? I tried keeping a blog or two, but lacking the tactile feeling of a paper notebook, the screen could never hold me for long.

Then I met my boyfriend. Something happened. Something that washed the smudged windows between me and the world outside. I can't explain it better. I just woke up. I was able to see clear, to feel better, to love. Not just to exist, but to live. It was such a novel and exhilarating experience, that I started keeping a journal again. I had to, HAD to write this down, so I could sit one day, reread it and feel it again.

So this is what I write in my journals - good and bad, whatever catches in my throat and needs to be written down. Sometimes I tear off pages, sometimes I cherish them.
All of them are from the road I have walked to stand here today.

I am still worried that my mom may find the diaries, now that I am not home, but the notebooks are. Or that my boyfriend may one day read some dar thoughts from the past and change his opinion about me. I worry about a lot of other things too. I keep my old diaries here in carton boxes under books, out of the day, and the new diary...well, the new diary is happy.

#71 indigoskye

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 18:14

I wrote in another thread about writing in my journal, and I think I will paste here some of the post.

I think that it is important to keep your journals,,,at least part of them. Writing the bad stuff is necessary, I do it too, it gets it out of me and on a page. Pages are easier to deal with, then confused feelings.

I started keeping a diary when I was 10. Back then it was simple stuff - what I ate, who I played with, what books I read. (I'm addicted to reading.)


I think that it was not so much that you had nothing to say, but that you were caught in technology as most of us were. I think that the transition from paper to tech has interrupted many of us in our lives as society has slowly learned to adapt to this new way of storing and processing information. I'm glad to hear you have returned to paper and that you are happier. :) I doubt that any of us use paper as much as we used to back in the day, but it still has its uses. Journals are one of the ways that I think paper excels over tech.
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#72 ethernautrix

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 18:43

I do have about 25 years of old journals stashed in an old wooden chest. As you, I have considered shredding or burning them, But they're still there.


Me, too.

But then what I really want is to tear out and burn the boring parts. Heh.

Then again... sometimes the minutiae sheds a lot of light.

I seldom page through these old notebooks -- I keep them all in a cabinet, so they're all easily accessible -- but every once in a while, I'll want to remember a detail, and I'll know about when it happened, so these notebooks are handy as a reference library.

Burn 'em? Keep 'em? It's a tantalizing thought -- wipe out one's own written history, a kind of self-induced amnesia. Doesn't mean all that stuff didn't happen, but there's no proof. I don't know. I always end up saying, "I don't have to decide today."
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#73 Citygirl

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 19:12

I wrote in another thread about writing in my journal, and I think I will paste here some of the post.

I think that it is important to keep your journals,,,at least part of them. Writing the bad stuff is necessary, I do it too, it gets it out of me and on a page. Pages are easier to deal with, then confused feelings.

I started keeping a diary when I was 10. Back then it was simple stuff - what I ate, who I played with, what books I read. (I'm addicted to reading.)

When I was 14-15, the content of my journals drastically changed. I can say that now, because 2 years ago I dug up all diaries from the depth of my desk and started reading them. I fell in love with this 15 year old girl I have been - sparkling with new ideas, with questions, with fluid handwriting and longworded sentences. She is someone I wish I could have remained all my life.

Later, age 16, the tone had changed. I had found a new group of friends, I had started to imitate the way they spoke. I had started to swear, carefully at first, and generously later. I was dismissive, impatient, arrogant, and self-centered. I have been a horrible teenager, I think.
Later, after befriending people from my high school - (I was in a French lycee in Bulgaria) the tone changed yet again. It is fascinating to observe how the friends you keep influence your way of thinking, from the words you use to the questions you ask. The expletives disappeared, and music lyrics started filling the pages. I tracked the development of my music tastes - the first lyrics deemed worthy of writing down were from Beatles, then Queen, then Nirvana, then Metallica, then Blind Guardian,then Jimmy Hendrix, then Pink Floyd, ...I could also see how the level of my English was getting better - by the lyrics I was finding meaningful.

Some pages were filled with rage. There were huge angry letters, screaming I HATE YOU! and newly appeared expletives as well, this time coded in English, a vain attempt to sound better. I hated using swear words in my language, they tasted bad. Using them in English at that time removed the coarseness somehow. Some of them were directed at my parents. Years later, when I was rereading my diaries with delight, I tore off those pages and threw them away, hoping that my parents have not seen them. It would have hurt my mom so bad, coming suddenly from nowhere, because now my father is not here anymore, and my mom and I have a great relationship. Actually we've always had, just that I seem to have been a very angry teenager.

Later the first loves came, some with relationships, some one-sided and silently pleading from the breathlessly written pages.

The diaries were the place where I wrote my poems too, after several drafts on flying paper, I transferred the sculptured verses on the pages and dedicated each and everyone to someone from my life.

Then I went to university, and the diaries recorded new friendships, lots of parties, lots of entries written in the middle of the night, when I had come back from a dance club, and needed to write a bit, so I can record the excitement I felt, and to allow the room to stop spinning. I was never much good with alcohol.

Then I came to China, and the diaries captured the novelty of everything, the new smells, tastes and cultures, the names of my colleagues at the university here, names that I needed help remembering and spelling. The journals kept inside their pages the loneliness I was afraid of spilling out, the feeling of displacement that enveloped me every evening while I was pulling the curtains to keep the night out.

Then I stopped writing. There were entries, one per year? Not very happy, not very meaningful...there were just dated words on a page that confirmed that I existed. I guess that this is all I did- existed. Alongside people, jobs, and passing friends. Years went by. I was still not writing. I was updating my facebook statuses, yes, but how much can you really write there? I tried keeping a blog or two, but lacking the tactile feeling of a paper notebook, the screen could never hold me for long.

Then I met my boyfriend. Something happened. Something that washed the smudged windows between me and the world outside. I can't explain it better. I just woke up. I was able to see clear, to feel better, to love. Not just to exist, but to live. It was such a novel and exhilarating experience, that I started keeping a journal again. I had to, HAD to write this down, so I could sit one day, reread it and feel it again.

So this is what I write in my journals - good and bad, whatever catches in my throat and needs to be written down. Sometimes I tear off pages, sometimes I cherish them.
All of them are from the road I have walked to stand here today.

I am still worried that my mom may find the diaries, now that I am not home, but the notebooks are. Or that my boyfriend may one day read some dar thoughts from the past and change his opinion about me. I worry about a lot of other things too. I keep my old diaries here in carton boxes under books, out of the day, and the new diary...well, the new diary is happy.



Thanks for this, its very interesting. My journalling story goes like this. I first started keeping a diary when I was about fourteen, my Auntie bought me one of those little page a day cutie ones with a lock and thats when the interest in diaries set in. I kept one every year. I would write it in every night, just day to day stuff and what was number one in the music charts at the time. I wish I'd have kept them but they got lost along the way. Then came the diary I kept when my so called workmates photocopied it and I ended up ripping that up as I said before and was put off keeping a diary for a long time. After that I didn't even keep an appointment diary for a while, goodness knows how I remembered everything! I married for the second time, had just started keeping the page a day small lockable diaries again when I met my intended but once we moved in together I abandoned the diary, didn't want him to see it. I soon started keeping an appointment diary, then I started having problems in my marriage and a friend of mine got me into journalling properly and venting on paper, not just writing a quick summary of my days. It really helped, it was therapy and I've been doing it ever since. I did throw away ten years worth of journals once during a paranoid moment and stopped journalling for a while but when my Mum contracted dementia, I needed that outlet again so I started journalling again.

So I am now at another stage where paranoia has set in. I do so want to keep those journals and feel encouraged by what you said about you ripping out pages you don't want others to see - does that spoil the continuation of the entries though? I don't want to destroy a lot of the entries or there would be nothing left but certain ones, other entries I guess I need to take the risk. Or I could go purely digital but am not sure if that would work for me.

#74 ethernautrix

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 20:52

So this is what I write in my journals - good and bad, whatever catches in my throat and needs to be written down. Sometimes I tear off pages, sometimes I cherish them. All of them are from the road I have walked to stand here today.


I just read this and am moved by it. Thank you for writing this.
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#75 CS388

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 00:12

...edit...

Burn 'em? Keep 'em? It's a tantalizing thought -- wipe out one's own written history, a kind of self-induced amnesia. Doesn't mean all that stuff didn't happen, but there's no proof. I don't know. I always end up saying, "I don't have to decide today."


Very nice. "I don't have to decide today" is an excellent (and true) solution. Thanks.

Re some earlier posts: Ripped out pages count as valid entries. Statements in themselves, in my book. (Or out of it).

Enjoy!

#76 suexilin

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:06


So this is what I write in my journals - good and bad, whatever catches in my throat and needs to be written down. Sometimes I tear off pages, sometimes I cherish them. All of them are from the road I have walked to stand here today.


I just read this and am moved by it. Thank you for writing this.


I feel delighted having this comment come from you :) I have noticed your posts around the forum and love your writing style :blush:

#77 Mags

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 12:03

CityGirl:

Privacy infringement by others has been inexcusable in the past for you. If journals help your state of mind and help you cope you really should continue though I am not giving any medical advice. Now administrative advice....well I can share a thought or two.

As for the therapy of writing in your journal, if you also see a counsellor (which is no ones business but yours) ask them to store the old journals with the other protected client files they have on you. Medical and mental health experts often keep things for more than 7 years in the office and archive files securely on or off site normally for 10 years after they conclude practice in the event of a liability issue or claim arising.

Safety deposit boxes serve a purpose for diaries, rare and special uninked fountain pens and negatives for pictures right? The challenge for digital journalism is some people can allow thoughts to flow better in ink and others....perhaps Gen X, Y, Z... it is a keyboard and the digital word or blog approaches that work best for them.

A locked document box or trunk literally could work also for your journal. Dump it in the crawl space or put the box in the attic. Most older journals today were locked away and found long after our words were inked on the pages. Those words if read by others now could cause their authors discomfort of seeing how another person was reacting to reading them. Your great, great, great grandchildren will likely only know you from a picture but the journal will bring the picture to life as you share memories and feelings and thought process. The picture becomes a person, you once someone reads your thoughts. You have invited them in to your head when reading what you wrote however lucid or jumbled. I dont redraft versions in a journal or on FPN. At work carefully crafting clear public messages for me is a chore that takes time and hard work as it is not my talent.

Keep your journals intact. Just make a storage decision the preserves your privacy which you value given the journal entries. I would say bank and safety deposit box is your best bet. Pay annually.... and send your executor a key. If you want the journals destroyed or held for a few more years share the instructions in a will that hopefully is not needed for yourself for another 90+ years.

Mags

So I am now at another stage where paranoia has set in. I do so want to keep those journals and feel encouraged by what you said about you ripping out pages you don't want others to see - does that spoil the continuation of the entries though? I don't want to destroy a lot of the entries or there would be nothing left but certain ones, other entries I guess I need to take the risk. Or I could go purely digital but am not sure if that would work for me.
[/quote]
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#78 Plume145

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 23:53

As for the therapy of writing in your journal, if you also see a counsellor (which is no ones business but yours) ask them to store the old journals with the other protected client files they have on you. Medical and mental health experts often keep things for more than 7 years in the office and archive files securely on or off site normally for 10 years after they conclude practice in the event of a liability issue or claim arising.

Wow, I had no idea about this, but it actually makes a lot of sense! I'm sure many people who are in therapy have privacy challenges - in fact I bet having one's privacy vip;enty invaded or one's confidence betrayed has to rank among the top reasons for *needing* the therapy in the first place!

I can see that Mags is in a different country than CityGirl, so maybe this doesn't apply everywhere. But I think it's an excellent solution. For anyone not in therapy, then perhaps a lawyer would be an alternative? After all, they keep hold of things like wills or other personal documents for many years, and these things are often handed over when a lawyer retires to whoever takes over their clients - surely they can keep hold of a key to a safety deposit box or something like that?

In any case, hiding one journal in use has got to be heaps easier than hiding a stack of them, whether it's burying it deep enough to evade a systematic snoop attach or quickly tucking it away from prying eyes. As far as OP goes, I still think the problem is mostly with the people in her life than with her method of journaling, but I am still grateful for this idea because I know sometimes there is no choice but to be in an environment where privacy is not guaranteed (eg a dorm, barracks etc) Even though personally I'm not all that likely to find myself in such a situation (too old for school dorms, too bad with authority for the military :P) I am glad to have something concrete to suggest next time I encounter a query like Citygirl's! So Mags, thanks for contributing that :)

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#79 Letterman

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 02:09

Fascinating thread. A friend of mine has an electronic writing pad thing for his computer. He is an artist, so maybe his pad would be good enough for handwriting. The scanning sounds like a pain for you. Maybe it would be better to write your journal entries into an encrypted file and periodically back it up onto an encrypted flash drive. This way at least you would get to view your handwriting although you wouldn't have the same tactile experience paper gives you.

As for your existing journals, you could seal those in envelopes. Locks only keep honest people out, so an envelope is better than nothing. I had a massive safe once. It weighed a thousand pounds. I wouldn't recommend getting one though because you wouldn't want an intruder forcing you to open it and the small ones just get carried away. I used to use a safety deposit box. It cost ninety dollars a year for a medium sized one. This would be cheaper than getting a storage unit somewhere and much more secure.
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#80 Mags

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 17:23

Happy to contribute and hope it works out.
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#81 chud

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 16:02

But then what I really want is to tear out and burn the boring parts. Heh.

Then again... sometimes the minutiae sheds a lot of light.


Exactly. How cool is a daily journal, full of all the boring minutiae of daily life, from some average person no one has every heard of, from the year 1675, say? Or even 1875? We'd be really glad they didn't decide to destroy the stuff that was only boring at the time. :)

#82 MikeZ

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 22:33

I won't weigh in on the security of digital over paper since there have been quite a few good ideas. I can, however, say that there is merit to a hand-written journal. I've been putting pen to paper for over twenty years, and have found its tactile nature to be as cathartic as the written word. Some days my handwriting is barely legible, some days billowing, but on most days it just looks like my "hand". Any deviation from that norm, though, tells me something about my state of mind that words cannot. And that picture is something that a typed page could never deliver.

For what it's worth, if someone wants to read what you've written they will find a way. In those twenty-odd years of paper journals I've had three people close to me break the unwritten "code" and read my words, and in each case what I wrote was held against me. Anyone determined to know your inner thoughts will not be deterred by the format. Had my thoughts been recorded more securely I'm sure that these three would have found a way to access it.

#83 Citygirl

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 00:07

Did this experience put you off journalling if what you wrote was used against you? This is my main worry when it comes to keeping a journal.

Edited by Citygirl, 18 January 2013 - 13:42.


#84 Citygirl

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 13:43

[quote name='MikeZ' timestamp='1358461999' post='2568416']
I won't weigh in on the security of digital over paper since there have been quite a few good ideas. I can, however, say that there is merit to a hand-written journal. I've been putting pen to paper for over twenty years, and have found its tactile nature to be as cathartic as the written word. Some days my handwriting is barely legible, some days billowing, but on most days it just looks like my "hand". Any deviation from that norm, though, tells me something about my state of mind that words cannot. And that picture is something that a typed page could never deliver.

For what it's worth, if someone wants to read what you've written they will find a way. In those twenty-odd years of paper journals I've had three people close to me break the unwritten "code" and read my words, and in each case what I wrote was held against me. Anyone determined to know your inner thoughts will not be deterred by the format. Had my thoughts been recorded more securely I'm sure that these three would have found a way to access it.


Did this experience put you off journalling if what you wrote was used against you? This is my main worry when it comes to keeping a journal.

#85 Martini25

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 16:07

Citygirl, I'm glad you found a solution that works for you. I started journaling when I was about 10 or so and have kept one since then. I don't have a lot of my older ones, what with moving and just general storage issues, but the few that I found have shown me the huge difference in how I journaled then and now. Now I have a catch all, where I write my personal thoughts and creative fiction all in once place. So someone reading it, thinking it was just a journal, would think I had the most delusional mind in all of creation.

Privacy will always be a matter that will hang out in your brain but that is what happens when you choose to write or type something down.

I have written somethings that definitely would change how a relationship would be viewed. But very few people would understand where I'm coming from. And I'm okay with that.

I also had something that I wrote down nearly tear my family apart but now, years after that fact, the most important people in my family are still at my side. It happens, but I was able to deal with it in a way that helped me and my family.

Edited by Martini25, 18 January 2013 - 16:26.

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#86 MikeZ

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 19:42

CityGirl,
My apologies for not responding sooner. To answer your question; no my unfortunate experiences have not stopped me from writing but they have made me a tad gun-shy. I'm a little cautious about what I record, concerned about the next possible breach, and I've used a few "code" words or phrases that have meaning to me but no one else to protect the innocent (so to speak). But in many cases I have taken a damn the torpedoes attitude and written what I like. Despite my experiences I'd like to believe in the goodness of man and not become too concerned over a possible interloper. I suppose I still trust that those close to me will honor my privacy as much as I honor theirs.