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Feel Of Inks


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#1 vivere

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 17:56

I am notibly a novice when it comes to the usage and art of FP's. I just bought a bottle of Mont Blanc Midnight Blue to go along with my Waterman Intense Black, and Noodler's Air Corp Blue Black. I am amazed at how the different inks produce such a variety of "feel" when ran though the same pen. Specifically, I've loaded them all into my Lamy Al-Star M, and Noodler's and Waterman (atleast in the limited inks I own) seem to produce a much smoother feel than the Mont Blanc. The Mont Blanc delivers a more tactile feel, and feeds back against the cheap paper I use. Just an interesting observation for a "newbie" to this beautiful art.

Can anyone give a more technical insight as to this variation? What are the proponents that contribute to the, what I can only call, friction?

Best,

Forrest?

#2 Tiffanyhenschel

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 18:12

What you have discovered is one of the peasures of using a fountain pen, :happyberet: and you are beginning to understand why some of use can fill whole notebooks with doodles and ink swatches. I don't have a technical explanation other than it has to do with the viscosity of the ink and how that particular ink combines with that particular nib, feed, and paper.


Your next step is to try those same inks with more nib sizes and different papers. Have fun experimenting!



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#3 Sandy1

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 15:07

Hi,

I briefly touched on the aspect of 'feel' in my Review of Pilot tsuki-yo, Post № 68 LINK

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#4 mAnuscript69

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 17:57

I believe the difference in feel you are experiencing can be attributed to the wetness/flow of the inks. Waterman inks tend to flow really well (wetter) while iron-gall inks generally do not flow as well (drier).

EDIT: Sandy pretty much nailed it with that post!

Edited by mAnuscript69, 13 December 2012 - 17:59.


#5 Eyedoc

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:22

I opened up a bottle of J Herbin ink (Éclat de Saphir) a week ago and was stunned by its smoothness. The 'feel' was incredible, and there is no other way I know to describe it. Some times mere words fall short. I have ordered some 1670 Bleu Ocean to see if I can find something even more special.
We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give - Winston Churchill

#6 Sandy1

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:56

I opened up a bottle of J Herbin ink (Éclat de Saphir) a week ago and was stunned by its smoothness. The 'feel' was incredible, and there is no other way I know to describe it. Some times mere words fall short. I have ordered some 1670 Bleu Ocean to see if I can find something even more special.


Hi,

IMHO, Visconti Blue offers a truly special writing experience and is an excellent ink.
*wiggle toes*

Bye,
S1

Edited by Sandy1, 10 February 2013 - 19:36.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#7 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:01

"""some inks really want to be absorbed""" Sandy.

Ah, Ha...a new to me thought....now I got to find out what inks, what papers.
:happyberet: Does that mean I got to look at Ink Jet Paper...some day???

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#8 Eyedoc

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:15

Thanks, Sandy. I will definitely try Visconti out. No matter what colours I try, I always end up back at blue!
We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give - Winston Churchill

#9 Sandy1

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 16:46

"""some inks really want to be absorbed""" Sandy.

Ah, Ha...a new to me thought....now I got to find out what inks, what papers.
:happyberet: Does that mean I got to look at Ink Jet Paper...some day???


Hi,

I think that ink jet paper may well have a place in one's array of papers.

It seems to me that IJ papers have been largely overlooked by most FP users, myself included, due to the preference for the writing experience, shading potential and line quality of the smoother [coated] papers.

I think that current IJ papers have improved quite a bit, at least on the high-end, (photo-printer), so perhaps past experience with 'lowest bidder' IJ papers gave all IJ papers a poor reputation amongst FP users.

Also, the distribution channel for high-end IJ paper may be quite different, as it might not be found in stationers or shops catering to FP users, but in the realm of print shops and custom/pro photo printers.

:hmm1:

Bye,
S1

Edited by Sandy1, 11 February 2013 - 16:57.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#10 Sandy1

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 16:56

Thanks, Sandy. I will definitely try Visconti out. No matter what colours I try, I always end up back at blue!


Hi,

You're welcome!

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#11 goby

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 19:07

The property of flow that is being mentioned is called viscosity. It measures the resistance of a liquid to sheer and tensile stress, which is another way of saying how easily the liquid moves.

As mentioned the solubility on the paper will also change the way the ink behaves. I have not had much luck with cheap paper, including IJ papers. All the ones I have tried feather badly with the inks I use. I tend to use cotton paper anymore, but it is a bit more costly.

Edited by goby, 15 February 2013 - 19:07.


#12 SteveE

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 22:08

There's more to the feel of an ink than viscosity. I sincerely doubt that the true viscosity varies much among commonly available fountain pen inks. (As the late Frank Dubiel always said. . . "Ink is just colored water.") What does vary widely, however, is the amount of surfactant, which reduces the surface tension of the ink and acts like a lubricant, that is contained within different inks. Inks having more surfactant will flow wetter, making your nib feel smoother as it glides along on the ink.

You can experiment for yourself by adding a tiny amount of liquid dish detergent to a container of ink. Just dipping a toothpick into the detergent and then using it as a mixer in the ink should make a difference. I keep a bottle of "doctored" ink handy for pens that don't flow well. Sometimes the added surfactant will act as a cleaner and cause the pen to work better with all inks, sometimes only the "treated" ink will flow well. In these cases, I eventually have to address the issue and adjust the flow.