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Where Can I Find Sheaffer History (Post-1960)


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#1 welch

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:52

What are good sites to piece together Sheaffer's history after about 1960. I have a fairly clear idea of what pens they were making and when and why up through about 1960. After that, it is hard to pin down the various models of Imperial: triumph nib, inlaid, gold nib, touchdown filler, and the dreaded cartridge / converter. "Dreaded" because the converters seem to have changed size a few times with different models, although most Sheaffers appear to take a modern cartridge.

Then there are the look-alikes: the Legacy / Heritage that looks a lot like the PfM, for instance.

Then there are all the finishes: gold, silver, patterned, etc etc.

Parker is well documented at Tony Fischier's site, and the Doc of Vacs explains the Snorkels in describing his pens. I understand the competition over nibs and filling systems: Snorkel and P61 capillary, both trying to reduce the drips and drops of filling as against the clean new ballpoint.

But then??

Yes, the Sheaffer Museum has great stories, and I enjoy them, but I haven't seen something like a company history.
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#2 jar

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:59

Yup. No company history, no desire it seems from Sheaffer to create it. There are tons of materials but mostly in unindexed and unorganized boxes of papers. There are sites like SheafferTarga.com but it too was just a labor of love by a few people.

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#3 Ernst Bitterman

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 15:55

I've got a bit of coverage for the modern era, but it's not what you'd call authoritative.
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#4 ashbridg

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 19:42

I have a fairly clear idea of what pens they were making and when and why up through about 1960. After that, it is hard to pin down the various models of Imperial: triumph nib, inlaid, gold nib, touchdown filler, and the dreaded cartridge / converter.

The PCA archives online are good. The best resource for just the different models and dates is the Fischler and Schneider book, Fountain Pens and Pencils: The Golden Age of Writing Instruments, often referred to as the "F&S Bluebook." There is no comprehensive reference available for Sheaffer pens since the 1960s. Such a book would take thousands of pages.
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#5 welch

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 02:09

I've got a bit of coverage for the modern era, but it's not what you'd call authoritative.


This is a very good "bit" of coverage.
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#6 Happy Harry

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:47

I've got a bit of coverage for the modern era, but it's not what you'd call authoritative.


A lot of info in a small package !! I could argue some of the model table on minor points but overall something to be proud about.